Equity & Inclusion

 

“All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights.”

Diversity among Dalhousie's faculty, staff and students contributes to excellence. In our recruitment efforts, hiring practices and day to day interactions, we embrace the principles of equality and fairness.

MEMOS

Latest memos from the Vice Provost, Equity & Inclusion:

International Day of Persons with Disabilities

MEMORANDUM  

To:                  The Dalhousie University community  

From:              Theresa Rajack-Talley, Vice-Provost Equity and Inclusion 

                       Judy MacDonald (Co-Chair) and the Staff & Faculty (dis)Ability Caucus   

Date:               Friday, December 3, 2021  

Re:                  International Day of Persons with Disabilities

Today, December 3, has been designated by the United Nations as International Day of Persons with Disabilities. Dalhousie University stands in strong support with our community of persons with disabilities and joins with the rest of Canada and the world in using this day as a reminder that disability inclusion is an essential condition to upholding human rights, sustainable development, and peace and security.  

Disability inclusion is central to our own growth here at Dalhousie as evident in the work of the Dalhousie University Accessibility Committee (DUAC) to turn our commitment into a reality, along with the support and advocacy from our recently formed (dis)Ability Caucus.

In 2017, Nova Scotia passed the Accessibility Act, becoming the third Canadian province to adopt accessibility legislation. The act recognizes accessibility as a human right and outlines how the province will improve accessibility by preventing and removing barriers. The Act sets a goal of an accessible Nova Scotia by 2030. Dal is required to craft and submit a comprehensive accessibility plan by April 2022. However, Dalhousie’s approach is not just to meet but exceed the core requirements set out in the Nova Scotia Accessibility Act through a collaborative approach. Learn more about Dal’s Accessibility Plan.

According to Quenta Adams, Director of Student Academic Success and Co-Chair, Dalhousie Accessibility Advisory Committee:  

I am thrilled by the work that is happening within the province and at Dalhousie. As we prepare to introduce our first multi-year accessibility plan, building upon Dalhousie’s previous EDIA initiatives and commitments, we would not have gotten to this space without the voices from our community being heard and amplified. This day, and the days after, is a reminder that we have an obligation to our students, staff and faculty to create and sustain accessible and equitable learning, living and playing environments.  

The focus on disability inclusion at this time could not be more urgent as the global COVID crisis continues to deepen pre-existing inequalities, including people with disabilities. Persons with disabilities are among one of the most excluded groups in our society not just in health but also within our educational and employment systems.  

Dalhousie University is the only postsecondary institution in Canada currently with a (dis)Ability Caucus. The caucus offers staff and faculty with (dis)Abilities an understanding space to share their struggles with ableism, to learn from one another about effective ways to tackle barriers, and to find a collective voice with volume — a voice whose time has come to be heard.  According to one caucus member:

Everybody on the caucus gets it – we are a sounding board for each other. We have different impairments, unique personalities, distinct roles within the university, yet a common bond exist as we have all paid the costs of living in an ableist world yet find hope in striving toward an inclusive university and society.      

Dalhousie is committed to making sure that we do all that we can to ensure that persons with disabilities are not left behind, and that we work together in creating an accessible Dal. This is important as another caucus member reminds us: “we are assets, not liabilities.”

Sincerely,

Theresa Rajack-Talley 

Vice-Provost Equity and Inclusion  

Judy MacDonald  

Co-Chair, Staff & Faculty (dis)Ability Caucus  

Director, School of Social Work  

Members of the Staff & Faculty (dis)Ability Caucus  

Dalhousie University is located in Mi'kma'ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi`kmaq. We are all treaty people.    

We acknowledge the histories, contributions, and legacies of the African Nova Scotian people and communities who have been here for over 400 years.

Transgender Day of Remembrance

MEMORANDUM  

To:                  The Dalhousie University community  

From:              Theresa Rajack-Talley, Vice Provost, Equity and Inclusion 

                       Lisa Delong, Director, Human Rights and Equity Services  

Date:               Friday, November 19, 2021  

Re:                  Transgender Day of Remembrance

We are in the midst of Transgender Awareness Week (Nov 15-19) and tomorrow is the Transgender Day of Remembrance, recognized annually on November 20 around the world to honour those who lost their lives due to anti-transgender hatred or discrimination. The Transgender Pride Flag will be raised on our Halifax and Truro campuses and our permanent campus flags will be lowered to commemorate the Transgender Day of Remembrance. Learn more about campus flag protocol at dal.ca/flags.

The Transgender Day of Remembrance helps raise awareness of hate crimes against transgender people and honours the lives of all trans people who may otherwise be forgotten. The day was founded in 1999 to memorialize the murder of Rita Hester, a transgender woman in Allston, Massachusetts. Dalhousie University strongly opposes violence and harassment based on discrimination and hate. We are committed to providing a safe and respectful environment, and to fostering a culture of diversity and inclusiveness.  

As part of our commitment to protect and learn, Dalhousie is offering an online training program that explores the meanings and common misconceptions around terms like transgender, gender identity, and gender expression and some practical actions we can take to make our workplace and our communities more inclusive for people with diverse range of gender identities and expressions.  

To access the course, please follow these steps: 

  1. Click on this link: https://nolan-s-school-805b.thinkific.com/courses/DAL-rethinking-gender-trans-inclusive-spaces-and-practices-0401 
  2. Create an account using a Dalhousie email address.
  3. Click on Enrol Now.
  4. Access the course through “My Courses” in the menu items on the top of the page.

Additionally, our upcoming Speak Truth to Power Forum will focus on gender-based violence. 

We encourage all members of our community to reflect on the purpose of this important date, to take advantage of this and other learning and listening opportunities, and to work together foster a safe and inclusive community for all. Let us use this commemoration to reaffirm our love and respect to all transgender people and reflect on all those affected by the physical and emotional trauma of transphobia and gender-based violence.  

Sincerely,  

Theresa Rajack-Talley 

Vice-Provost, Equity and Inclusion  

Lisa Delong 

Director, Human Rights and Equity Services

Dalhousie University is located in Mi'kma'ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi`kmaq. We are all treaty people.  

We acknowledge the histories, contributions, and legacies of the African Nova Scotian people and communities who have been here for over 400 years.

Mi’kmaq History Month and Dalhousie Mawio’mi

MEMORANDUM

To:                   The Dalhousie University community  

From:               Theresa Rajack-Talley, Vice-Provost Equity, and Inclusion 

                        Catherine Martin, Director of Indigenous Community Engagement  

Date:                Friday, October 8, 2021  

Re:                   Mi’kmaq History Month and Dalhousie Mawio’mi  

Dear Dalhousie community:  

In 1993, Nova Scotia Premier John Savage and Mi’kmaw Grand Chief Ben Sylliboy declared October as the official month to recognize and celebrate Mi’kmaw culture and heritage. The month begins with Treaty Day (October 01) that speaks to the 1752 Peace & Friendship Treaty and recognizes that we are all treaty people on lands that for thousands of years the Mi’kmaq have called home. These treaties are part of a long tradition of relationship-making meant to protect Indigenous ways of life with reciprocity and respect.  

This year’s poster for Mi’kmaq History Month highlights four major themes: Ceremony and Consensus, Peace and Friendship, Denial and Damage, and Renewal and Reconciliation. It reminds us that despite the challenges faced by the Indigenous/Mi’kmaq peoples, they continue to thrive. Dalhousie’s faculty, staff, students, administrators, and alumni join the Mi’kmaq in celebrating their resilience and proud traditions and pay homage to their ancestors.  

History was created at Dalhousie in 2016 when, for the first time, the Mi’kmaq Grand Council Flag was raised on the Halifax campus’ quad. That moment marked a significant milestone as the Mi’kmaq Flags are now permanently installed on all Dal campuses. While such symbolism of respect is important Dalhousie is committed to doing more. We see ourselves playing a role in the teaching, researching, learning of indigenous knowledge, practices, and culture; on ways of knowing and protecting indigenous knowledge; of providing service to the indigenous communities, particularly the Mi’kmaq. In 2015 Dalhousie introduced the Indigenous Studies minor and is now in the process of extending it to a major and offering Mi’kmaq language instruction. We initiated student support services and continue to do so in ways of improving the number of Mi’kmaq students enrolled and completing their studies. We have continued our efforts towards reconciliation through the hiring of a Director of Indigenous Community Engagement to keep us truthful and connected to the community and our Elders-in-Residence program as we work in closer collaboration with Dalhousie’s Indigenous Advisory Council.

Provost Frank Harvey says there is more Dalhousie can and should do: “Recognizing that Dalhousie University sits on unceded Mi’kmaw territory and that the Mi’kmaq are the original inhabitants of this territory, we have identified the Mi’kmaq as a priority in our strategic plan, Third Century Promise (Si’st Kasqimt lnaqnipunqekl Teli L’wi’tmasimk).  

One of the campus highlights of Mi’kmaq History Month is Dalhousie’s annual Mawio’mi gathering. Last year, because of COVID-19, we could not celebrate in person.  Fortunately, this year the Mawio’mi will once again take place on the Studley Quad on Wednesday, October 13 at 10 a.m. Says key organizer, Michele Graveline, “We welcome the Dalhousie community to the 11th Annual Dalhousie Mawio'mi. Join us for a celebration and honouring of Mi'kmaq and Indigenous culture. We look forward to the big drum and dancers, the amazing Indigenous artisans, and the wonderful food to fuel our bodies and spirits in this unique time. All COVID protocols will be adhered.  

For more on the Mawio’mi, visit the Dalhousie Events Calendar.   

To learn more about Mi’kmaw history and culture visit https://cdn.dal.ca/content/dam/Dalhousie/pdf/management/News/Mi'kmaw%20history%20and%20culture%20resources.pdf

M’sit Nokomaq / All my relations,

Theresa Rajack-Talley 

Vice-Provost Equity and Inclusion  

Catherine Martin

Director of Indigenous Community Engagement

Dalhousie University is located in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq. We are all Treaty people

Racist graffiti incident on campus

MEMORANDUM

To:        The Dalhousie University community

From:     Frank Harvey, Provost and Vice-President Academic

             Theresa Rajack-Talley, Vice-Provost Equity and Inclusion

Date:      Wednesday, September 29, 2021

Re:         Racist graffiti incident on campus

On Monday, September 27, 2021, Security Services received a report of racist graffiti written on LeMarchant Place Residence’s fourth floor by individuals who do not belong to that student residence.  Those responsible have been identified. The matter has been referred to Halifax Regional Police and disciplinary action will also be pursued through Dalhousie's Code of Student Conduct.

The hostile and vile expressions of anti-Semitic and anti-Black racism were abhorrent, deeply impactful and an affront to all that we value and aspire to stand for as a community — inclusion, respect, human decency and dignity.   

Dalhousie strongly condemns this act of vandalism and hatred that so blatantly contradicts our core values and clearly violates university policy condemning expressions of hate, bias and discrimination in all forms.   

We believe that the collective talents of students, faculty and staff at Dalhousie are maximized in communities and environments that are welcoming and inclusive, where our differences provide dynamism and vibrancy to and enrich the life and work of the university, and where everyone feels a sense of belonging and is empowered to fully contribute and achieve their best.

We will continue to work towards ensuring a safe and respectful learning, living and working environment for everyone.

We encourage anyone affected by these events to reach out to the university for the following available resources and supports.

Dalhousie Security is responsible for the safety and security of the Dal community and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Security Services by phone (902-494-4109) or email (security@dal.ca).   

Services for Students:

Student Health & Wellness Centre (livewell@dal.ca)

Black Student Advising Centre (bsac2@dal.ca)

International Centre (international.centre@dal.ca)

Multifaith Centre (multifaith@dal.ca)

Services for Faculty and Staff:

Employee and Family Assistance Program (https://www.workhealthlife.com/)

Human Rights & Equity Services (hres@dal.ca)

Dalhousie University sits on the Traditional Territory of the Mi’kmaq. We are all Treaty People.

We acknowledge the histories, contributions, and legacies of African Nova Scotian people and communities who have been here for over 400 years.

National Day for Truth and Reconciliation - September 30

MEMORANDUM

To:           The Dalhousie University community

From:       Theresa Rajack-Talley, Vice-Provost Equity and Inclusion

                Catherine Martin, Director of Indigenous Community Engagement

Date:        Monday, September 27, 2021

Re:           National Day for Truth and Reconciliation - Thursday, September 30

Dear Dalhousie community,

This year, for the first time, September 30 has been designated by the Federal government as the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, a statutory holiday to commemorate the horrific legacy of residential schools in Canada.  This new holiday is one of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s (TRC) 94 calls to action.  On this day, Dalhousie University will be closed, classes will not be held, and only employees designated as essential will be required to work. In his August 31 memo, President Saini made it clear that the day is for us — as a community located in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq — to learn and reflect on the history, culture, and lived experiences of Indigenous peoples.

This year, the day marks a very special and sacred time in our history as we honor the lives of the children who attended Shubenacadie Residential School and all the others across Turtle Island - Canada.  We encourage the Dal community to take some time from everyday life to reflect and soul search on the atrocities that were done to the sacred lives of Indigenous children, some of who never returned home; to understand that this is part of Canada’s truth/ history; and begin to embark upon a journey of healing and change. As Catherine Martin emphasizes: “This day is not a “holiday”; rather it is a memorial, and a time of grieving, forgiveness, and transformation.”

September 30 has, since 2013, also been designated Orange Shirt Day across Canada to commemorates the experience of Phyllis (Jack) Webstad, who created the day. Orange was the colour of her shirt on her first day attending residential school, and it was taken from her when she arrived.

In honor of the National Truth and Reconciliation Day, the Henry Hicks Building (Halifax) and Cummings Hall (Truro) will be lit orange on September 30 as part of a national “Light the Country Orange” campaign organized by the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation, and orange flags will be raised at both campuses.   

As part of reflection, we encourage all to participate in the special events hosted by the Dal community including:

  • A three-day speaker series titled "Preparing for a Day of Truth and Reconciliation" hosted by the Indigenous Health in Medicine program on September 27, 28, 29 (email IHIM@dal.ca);
  • A free course titled 4 Seasons of Reconciliation, Dal Libraries;
  • A screening of the film The Secret Path on September 29 at noon in the McInnes room at which special TRC postcards will be distributed;  
  • An Orange Shirt unveiling on the Truro Campus in the Student Learning Commons, which will be on display beginning September 28 at 12:30 pm until Monday, October 4. (see The Golden Ram, Dalhousie Agricultural Students' Association monthly campus newspaper, for more info).  
  • A virtual sunrise ceremony hosted by Catherine Martin, Director of Indigenous Community Engagement, on September 30 from 7-7:30 a.m. (Link will be made available from the HRES website.)
  • A virtual Zoom presentation from Dal faculty member Patricia Doyle-Bedwell, hosted by the Dalhousie Faculty Association, taking place on September 30 from 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.
  • A virtual talk and discussion on Tuesday, September 28th from 6-8pm, by Catherine Martin, hosted by the School of Resource and Environmental Studies Student Society.

There are many more events taking place in Mi’kmaki, and across Turtle Island. For more information on both Dalhousie and community events, visit the HRES website. We also invite the Dal community to join the online sunrise ceremony organized by APTN and airing live on television. More information here.

We end this memo with a quote from the beloved late Grand Chief Ben Sylliboy who said in a film (NFB 2004) - "At night we cried for our parents… we will never let this happen again.”   

M’sit Nokomaq / All my relations,

Theresa Rajack-Talley

Vice-Provost Equity and Inclusion

Catherine Martin

Director of Indigenous Community Engagement

Dalhousie University is located in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq. We are all Treaty people.

Celebrating Pride Month

Thursday, August 12, 2021

Re:                  Celebrating Pride Month

While much of the world celebrates Pride Month in June, here in Nova Scotia and at Dalhousie we usually celebrate our LGBTQ2SIA+ communities in July. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and health and safety, Pride Month is being commemorated in Halifax in August this year.   

Pride looks different around the world, but it shares a common purpose: to fight for continued recognition of the basic human rights for all LGBTQ2SIA+ people everywhere. What was sparked in New York with the Stonewall riots of 1969 is now a global movement.  Dalhousie’s students, faculty, staff, friends, family and alumni join with the LGBTQ2SIA+ community in Halifax, the rest of the country, and the world in celebrating Pride Month.   

To recognize Pride Month, we will raise the Progress Pride flags on Dalhousie’s campuses beginning today (August 12). The different colors of the flag are reflective of the diversity of those that make up the LGBTQ2SIA+ community including Black and People of Colour. Dalhousie University sits on the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq People and as we celebrate Pride Month, we acknowledge the Two-Spirit and Indigenous LGBTQ2SIA+ individuals and communities of Nova Scotia, and the Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance.   

We are truly thankful to the dedicated LGBTQ2SIA+ individuals, supporters, and those who paved the way in building a more inclusive Dalhousie, including those currently developing a new a Queer Studies certificate for Dalhousie. While we are unable to have large in-person events on our campus, we encourage all in Halifax to support the Halifax Pride Festival taking place in the city from August 12 to 22. A list of activities organized can be found at https://www.halifaxpride.com/calendar.  A limited number of free tickets will be given to Dalhousie community members via the HRES Instagram account.

Have a safe and happy Pride Month!

Theresa Rajack-Talley
Vice-Provost, Equity & Inclusion

Madeleine Stinson
President, Dalhousie Student Union

Emancipation Day - August 1

MEMORANDUM

To:        The Dalhousie University community

From:     Deep Saini, President and Vice-Chancellor

             Theresa Rajack-Talley, Vice-Provost Equity and Inclusion

Date:     Tuesday, July 27, 2021

Re:        Emancipation Day – August 1

Earlier this year, Canada’s House of Commons voted unanimously to designate August 1 as Emancipation Day. Dalhousie University joins the government, other universities, and communities in Nova Scotia, Canada and internationally in celebrating this important occasion.   

On August 1, 1834, the Slavery Abolition Act came into legislative effect throughout the British Empire. This marked the first Emancipation Day and brought with it the legal end of centuries of enslavement of African People and their descendants. At the time of its enactment, the new law spelled legal freedom for nearly a million African people throughout the British Empire, including in Canada. Official national observance of Emancipation Day is an impetus to reflect on the ongoing impacts of slavery on people of African ancestry in Canada and elsewhere.   

Dalhousie’s role in this important commemoration is noteworthy. Former faculty member and current Senator Wanda Thomas Bernard has worked for years to have the day officially commemorated. Thanks to her efforts and the efforts of many others, Emancipation Day provides us occasion to acknowledge an important part of our shared history in Canada — one that has traditionally gone unremarked upon.   

Dalhousie has also documented our own intersections with the historical legacies of slavery, and with a vital imperative to help strengthen and support the African Nova Scotian community, this occasion is particularly timely and relevant. This weekend, Dalhousie will be raising the new African Nova Scotian flag — designed by visual artist Wendie Wilson and revealed earlier this year — on both our Halifax and Truro campuses in honour of Emancipation Day.

We would also like to invite members of the Dalhousie community to a special virtual panel discussion hosted by Halifax Public Libraries this Wednesday (July 28) called Emancipation and Liberation: Where Do We Go from Here?, featuring multiple Dalhousie faculty members. Afua Cooper, Barb Hamilton-Hinch and Isaac Saney will be joined by NSCAD University’s Gregory Adolphe-Nazaire to explore the meaning of the Slavery Abolition Act within the contemporary context of the struggle for racial justice.   

Let us each do our part to recognize Emancipation Day through contemplation, education, celebration and action.

Sincerely,

Deep and Theresa

 

--

Deep Saini

President and Vice-Chancellor

Theresa Rajack-Talley

Vice-Provost Equity and Inclusion   

Call for Nominations – President's Awards for the Advancement of Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Accessibility

Tuesday, July 20, 2021  

At Dalhousie, we aspire to be a national leader in championing equity, diversity, inclusion, and accessibility (EDIA). Inclusive excellence is core to our new strategic direction, Third Century Promise, and the efforts of our faculty, students and staff in advancing EDIA are vital to our collective success. 

Each year, we recognize individuals and groups across our campuses who have made outstanding contributions in this space with President’s Awards for the Advancement of Equity, Diversity, Inclusion and Accessibility – and we are now inviting nominations for the 2020-2021 awards.  

We encourage the nomination of individuals or groups (including units, departments, faculties, or campus organizations) and will be providing three awards:

  • A faculty or staff individual award 
  • A faculty or staff group award 
  • A student individual or group award 

Nominees should demonstrate a commitment to dismantling systemically unjust structures and promote an inclusive campus community at Dalhousie, going above and beyond what would normally be expected in their everyday duties to accomplish these objectives.  

If you have worked with an individual or group who deserves recognition for their exceptional or creative efforts to advance Dalhousie’s EDIA work, please nominate them by August 31, 2021.  

More information about the nomination process, along with the nomination forms, may be found here

Please help us recognize and celebrate the extraordinary work happening across our campuses to make Dalhousie a thriving community where everyone belongs.  

Sincerely, 

Deep and Theresa 

Deep Saini
President and Vice-Chancellor

Theresa Rajack-Talley
Vice-Provost, Equity & Inclusion

Dalhousie mourns the Saskatchewan residential school child victims

Note: Some may find the contents of this message triggering. 

June 24, 2021

Kwe' (Greetings):

The Dalhousie University community extends our deepest sympathy to the survivors, families and Indigenous communities in Saskatchewan who are mourning the discovery of 751 unmarked graves of sacred children at the site of a former residential school in that province.  

This is the second such horrific discovery in less than a month with others to follow that will continue to mark one of the darkest chapters in Canada’s history. We are heartbroken at this news and the Dalhousie community offers our unwavering support to the Indigenous communities impacted by this tragedy. We continue to work closely with Dalhousie’s Indigenous Advisory Council on how to better address this issue and make Dalhousie more inclusive in all that we do. To honour the 751 children whose lives were lost at the former Saskatchewan residential school and their families, Dalhousie will lower its flags to half-mast. 

We invite you, this evening, to join our Speak Truth to Power Forum: They Found Us and We Are Coming Home to listen and learn from Indigenous panelists on this devastating issue. The event begins at 6 p.m.; full details can be found here.

A National Residential School Crisis Line has been set up to provide support for former students and those affected. Access emotional and crisis referral services by calling the 24-hour national crisis line: 1-866 925-4419. 

We also encourage anyone affected by this news to reach out to the university for available resources and supports. 

  • The Elders in Residence program is available to students across campus, The Elders are committed to being available to students for guidance, counsel and support. 
  • The Indigenous Student Centre helps create a sense of belonging to support student success while at Dalhousie. Our Indigenous Student Advisor provides support and advocacy for all of Dalhousie’s Indigenous students. 
  • Dalhousie’s Human Rights and Equity Services provides confidential advice and support if a member of our community has faced race-based harassment and/or discrimination. 
  • Students who require immediate support should contact Student Health and Wellness by phone to book an appointment: 902-494-2171 (Halifax); 902-893-6369 (Truro). Additional e-mental health options for students are available, including Good2Talk – free and confidential counselling for post-secondary students (dal.ca/good2talk); Ask a Nurse – confidential answers to your health questions within 72 hrs; and TAO – an online mental health library. 
  • Faculty and staff resources are available through our Employee Family Assistance Program, which can be accessed at workhealthlife.com or at login.lifeworks.com. Please also visit our remote working site for employees for additional mental health resources.

Our sympathy, strength, and spirit are with you. 

Deep, Frank & Theresa 

--

Deep Saini
President and Vice-Chancellor
deep.saini@dal.ca   

Frank Harvey
Provost and Vice-President Academic
provost@dal.ca

Theresa Rajack-Talley
Vice-Provost Equity and Inclusion 
theresa.rajack-talley@dal.ca

Dalhousie University is located in Mi’kma’ki, the ancestral and unceded territory of the Mi’kmaq. We are all Treaty people.

Dalhousie condemns anti-Muslim attack in London, ON

June 9, 2021

Dalhousie University strongly condemns the horrific attack against a Muslim family in London, ON.  

We express our sympathy to the family and loved ones of those who were lost and to those members of the Muslim community on our campus and around our province who are experiencing feelings of grief and anger as a result of this act of hate and Islamophobia.  

Dalhousie denounces all forms of faith-based hate, violence and discrimination. Such horrible acts stand in direct opposition to our core values. We stand in solidarity with the Muslim community and all those who face discrimination as we work toward embracing diversity and making Dalhousie an inclusive and safe place to study, work and live.  

This week’s horrible news comes in the wake of an already incredibly difficult time in our nation. We understand that hearing about and dealing with multiple painful and traumatic events can be hard to bear.  

Let us draw strength from each other and collectively work towards greater humanity for all.   

For those who would like to attend, there will be an outdoor community vigil this evening at 7 p.m. at the Ummah Mosque, 6225 Chebucto Rd., Halifax. Public health measures will be in place. For more details: https://www.facebook.com/ummahmasjid/posts/5563917680346544

Please remember to offer compassion, understanding, and support to our community members who are hurting.  

If you need immediate support, please know there are resources available: 

  • Dalhousie’s Human Rights and Equity Services provides confidential advice and support if a member of our community has faced race-based harassment and/or discrimination.  
  • Students who require immediate support should contact Student Health and Wellness by phone to book an appointment: 902-494-2171 (Halifax); 902-893-6369 (Truro). Additional e-mental health options for students are available, including Good2Talk – free and confidential counselling for post-secondary students (dal.ca/good2talk); Ask a Nurse – confidential answers to your health questions within 72 hrs; and TAO – an online mental health library.  
  • Faculty and staff resources are available through our Employee Family Assistance Program, which can be accessed at workhealthlife.com or at login.lifeworks.com. Please also visit our remote working site for employees for additional mental health resources.   

Our sympathy, strength, and spirit are with you. 

Deep, Frank & Theresa