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In Focus Archive

TWO MINUTES TO MIDNIGHT: Can the Crisis in North Korea be Defused?

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What it is:

With support from Global Affairs Canada, and the Atlantic Council for International Cooperation, the IDS Department is offering a series of events about the human security crisis in North Korea.  

The Kim Regime is responsible not only for aggressive nuclear and tactical military aggression, but also for overseeing an alarming human rights crisis in the country.  The United Nation’s Security Council passed Resolution 2371 against North Korea, and sanctions continue mount against the Kim Regime.

The International community continues to condemn North Korea’s military actions, but is there a clear path forward in addressing the North Korean crisis?   

What we are doing:

On November 23rd, several professors in FASS will be speaking on the subject in the Potter Auditorium at 7pm.  All welcome.  

Learn more:

Professor Huish is working on a series of research projects to better understand the impact of North Korean refugee activists against the Kim Regime.  

He also explores the efficacy of sanctions, arguing that they are not effective as North Korea continues to procure resources for ballistic and nuclear programs, and was recently featured in HK-01, a news firm out of Hong Kong and CBC Radio One's The Current.  Click here to listen

He has published findings that expose maritime traffic into North Korea, despite sanctions in Asia Policy and in the Canadian Naval Review. And also in The Toronto Star with former Masters student Somed Shahadu.   

Listen here for Prof. Huish's interview with 1310News in Ottawa. Watch here for his interview with CTV News.

Dalhousie University awarded an Honorary Degree to Shin Donghyuk, a survivor of the North Korean labour camps.  Learn more about Mr. Shin, and his connection to Dalhousie here.  

Get Engaged:

To learn more about North Korea, visit Liberty in North KoreaNo Chain, The Committee for Human Rights in North KoreaThe Camp 14 Project, and attend the Panel Discussion:

CUBA'S PRIDE

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What it is:

Cuba’s Gay Revolution: Normalizing Sexual Diversity Through a Health-Based Approach is a new book written by Dr. Emily J. Kirk which explores Cuba’s unique health-based approach to improving LGBTQ (sexual diversity) rights. 

This study is the first time the Cuban government has given permission to a foreign researcher to conduct a comprehensive study on the normalization of sexual diversity, including access to archives and interviews with key figures. 

What we are doing:

Dr. Emily J. Kirk is a SSHRC post-doctoral fellow in IDS, and continues to research the efficacy of the health-based approach and ongoing changes on the island.  

She has published her findings on this topic in the International Journal of Cuban Studies, the Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and has a book chapter in Continuity and Change under Raúl Castro: A Contemporary Cuban Reader. She has also given various interviews for BBC World News. 

Learn more:

Students can learn more about Cuba through the Cuba Programs offered by the IDS Department, based at the University of Havana. 

Other courses offered at Dalhousie on Cuba include: 

SPAN 2109/HIST 2384 ‘Cuba from Colonial Times,'

SPAN 2110/ HIST 2385 ‘Cuban Cultural Revolution’ and

IDS/SPAN 3408 ‘The Cuban Development Model’. 

Get Engaged:


To learn more about Cuba’s Gay Revolution or sexual diversity in Cuba, contact Dr. Emily J. Kirk.

Order your copy of the book and receive a 30% discount, use code LEX30AUTH17.

 

CRISIS IN NORTH KOREA

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What it is:

The United Nation’s Security Council passed Resolution 2371 against North Korea.  

The Kim Regime is responsible not only for aggressive nuclear and tactical military aggression, but also for overseeing an alarming human rights crisis in the country.  

The International community continues to condemn North Korea’s military actions, but less is said about the human rights abuses. .   

What we are doing:

Professor Huish is working on a series of research projects to better understand the impact of North Korean refugee activists against the Kim Regime.  

He also explores the efficacy of sanctions, arguing that they are not effective as North Korea continues to procure resources for ballistic and nuclear programs.  

He has published findings that expose maritime traffic into North Korea, despite sanctions in Asia Policy and in the Canadian Naval Review. And also in The Toronto Star with former Masters student Somed Shahadu.   

Listen here for Prof. Huish's interview with 1310News in Ottawa.

Dalhousie University awarded an Honorary Degree to Shin Donghyuk, a survivor of the North Korean labour camps.  Learn more about Mr. Shin, and his connection to Dalhousie here.  

Learn more:

Students in INTD-3003 (Development and Activism) have worked on the human crisis in North Korea.  Student efforts support refugee rescues out of the country, and political action towards world leaders for better solutions to the North Korean crisis.  

Get Engaged:

To learn more about North Korea, visit Liberty in North KoreaNo Chain, The Committee for Human Rights in North Korea, and The Camp 14 Project.