Events

 

UPCOMING ONLINE WEBINARS, PANELS, AND COURSES

Graduate Teaching Dossier Retreat (November 23–December 4)

A teaching dossier is a critical component for any academic job search, and yet we often do not consider the time and work it takes to develop a dossier that reflects the experience, values, and evidence of our teaching. This two-week retreat covers the fundamentals of a teaching dossier (e.g., teaching philosophy, student evaluations, teaching materials), and will provide you with an opportunity to take the time to start developing the foundations to your own dossier and reflect on your learning and teaching experiences. You will also have the opportunity to give and receive peer feedback. The retreat facilitators will also be available to answer questions and offer guidance on the development of your dossier.

Over the two weeks, participants will be expected to engage asynchronously several times, attend 2 synchronous sessions, create a draft of your philosophy, as well as have the opportunity for two additional synchronous sessions. Please see the schedule of activities below. Anticipate spending around 5.5 hours engaging in synchronous and asynchronous activities. Those registered are expected to complete the scheduled tasks below and engage with their peers during the entire duration, this includes being prepared to turn on your microphone and, if you are comfortable, your camera. There are a limited number of seats, and given that this learning opportunity is based on the active exchange and collaboration between peers, please ensure you will be able to fully commit and participate for the entire duration of the retreat when you register.

By participating in this two-week retreat, you will receive 5 professional development hours towards the completion of your CUTL as well as create and receive peer feedback on your teaching dossier. 

REGISTER

 

Schedule

Downloadable PDF

 

Module 1: Introduction to reflecting on teaching and learning

Date Activity Format Anticipated Time Commitment
Monday, Nov 23 Introductions & Meeting your Peers Asynchronous 10 – 20 minutes
Tuesday, Nov 24 Value Exercise & Reflection Asynchronous 5 – 10 minutes
Dossier Overview Video Asynchronous 5 minutes

 

Module 2: Creating a Teaching Philosophy

Date Activity Format Anticipated Time Commitment
Wednesday, Nov 25 Teaching Philosophy discussion and activity Synchronous
(2-3pm AT)
1 hour
Thursday, Nov 26 Create philosophy draft Asynchronous 1 hour
Friday, Nov 27 Write in session Synchronous
(2-3pm AT)
(Optional)
(1 hour, Optional)
Post draft philosophy (11:59pm) Asynchronous 5 minutes

 

Module 3: Dossier components

Date Activity Format Anticipated Time Commitment
Monday, Nov. 30 – Thursday Dec. 3 Dossier Component Video Asynchronous 5 minutes
Individual activity sheets (biographical sketch, teaching responsibilities and activities) Asynchronous 30 – 45 minutes
Tuesday, Dec 1 Peer-review of Philosophies due (11:59pm) Asynchronous 30 – 45 minutes

 

Module 4: Evaluating your teaching effectiveness

Date Activity Format Anticipated Time Commitment
Wednesday, Dec 2 Evidence of teaching effectiveness discussion & activity Synchronous
(2-3pm AT)
1 hour

 

Module 5: Looking Forward and Conclusion

Date Activity Format Anticipated Time Commitment
Thursday, Dec 3 Draft Future goals Asynchronous 10 – 20 minutes
Friday, Dec 4 Write in Session Synchronous
(2-3pm AT)
(optional)
(1 hour, Optional)

December 3: Online Conduct: Responding to Student Behaviour in the Online Environment

Thursday, December 3, 2020 | 3-4:30 p.m. | Online via Collaborate Ultra

We all hope that our learning environments are spaces where students feel safe to learn and engage with one another but sometimes we are faced with situations that threaten that safety and comfort for our students and for ourselves as instructors. This panel will discuss what instructors and TAs can do if they witness, or if a student brings to them, inappropriate comments, situations of harassment, or other instances of concerning conduct in our new online environment. The panelists will offer suggestions on how to best respond to the situation as well as the appropriate channels for action or support.

Panelists

Crystal Ragush, Sexualized Violence Advisor, Human Rights & Equity Services
Cynthia Murphy, Director, Student Experience
Jake MacIsaac, Assistant Director, Dal Security

Moderator

Kate Thompson, Educational Developer, Centre for Learning and Teaching

REGISTER

December 14: Small Teaching Online: Practical Strategies for Teaching Online During Covid-19 and Beyond

Hosted by the Centre for Learning and Teaching and the Faculty of Management

 

Monday, December 14, 2020
11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m.
Online via Teams Live Events


Flower Darby
Educator | Author | Speaker
www.flowerdarby.com
 

Remote, blended and online courses present unique challenges for both students and faculty. Small teaching can help. We’ll explore practical, evidence-based techniques you can apply in your online teaching practice, small but impactful strategies that result in significant gains in student engagement and learning. You’ll gain guiding principles for structuring learning in online and blended environments, brief learning activities, and tips for impactful yet not too time-consuming communication with students. These approaches can also enhance in-person teaching during and after Covid-19, so join us to explore new ways of teaching online to enhance your overall practice.

Biography

Flower Darby celebrates and promotes effective teaching in all class formats to include, welcome, and support all students as they learn and succeed. As faculty and an instructional designer, she’s taught community college and university classes for over 24 years in a range of subjects including English, Technology, Leadership, Dance, and Pilates. A seasoned face-to-face and online educator, Darby loves to apply learning science across the disciplines, and to help others do the same.

Flower speaks, writes, presents and consults on teaching and learning theory and practice both nationally and internationally. She has helped educators all over the world become more effective in their work. She is the author, with James M. Lang, of Small Teaching Online: Applying Learning Science in Online Classes, and she’s a columnist for The Chronicle of Higher Education. Her new book on emotion science and teaching with technology is forthcoming from West Virginia University Press.

REGISTER

      

PAST WEBINARS AND PANELS

COURSE: What is anti-racist/anti-oppressive education? An introductory course for white faculty wanting to affect change (October 5–December 14)

This course is only open to Dalhousie Faculty and instructors

*Regististration is limited to 50 participants

Tragically, it took the murder of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man at the hands of a white Minneapolis police officer, to awaken many white people (especially within the United States and Canada), to anti-Black and anti-Indigenous violence and systemic racism.  Although Floyd’s murder was what finally drew the attention of many folks who had previously been unaware, there are countless individuals who have died or been brutalized, both before this event and afterward, and in both the United States and Canada. The news has erupted with those individuals’ stories, and once-silenced survivors are stepping forward at a time when it seems that the ‘dominant’ culture might actually be listening, and that there is the possibility of reform. And in all of this, social media is rife with many white people asking, “What can I do?”

Taking this course can be one small, first step, by assuming the responsibility of educating ourselves to address systemic racism within our own institution. As white teachers and academics, we will take on this work under Kayla Reed’s (Executive Director, Action St. Louis), “A.L.L.Y” framework*:

  • Always centre the impacted
  • Listen and learn from those who live in oppression 
  • Leverage your privilege
  • Yield the floor 

Through anti-racist and anti-oppressive theory and voices, we will learn how to position ourselves, our disciplines, and our institution in relation to the systemic racism and oppression in which they are embedded, and that they reinforce and reproduce. We will simultaneously determine how to put into practice what we have learned.  Anti-racist and anti-oppressive education are relevant in every discipline, and folks from every Faculty are encouraged to engage in this critical work.

While open to anyone, this course is designed for those who are just beginning their anti-racist and anti-oppressive education learning journey.

Outcomes

By the end of this course, you will be able to:

  • Uncover and discuss how racism and oppression are replicated and reinforced in all institutional spaces  
  • Identify and plan how you will apply each component of the ALLY framework in your teaching, research, and academic (and personal) lives
  • Embrace these first developmental steps as part of lifelong learning,  

This course is primarily asynchronous (Brightspace, OneNote) with opportunities (but no requirement) to meet synchronously one-on-one with the instructor, and/or with your peers (via Teams).  Course modules, assignments, and opportunities for engagement will be released every two weeks (five modules for 10 weeks, from October 5-December 14).  Synchronous discussion opportunity dates and times will be determined by participants.

Facilitator

Tereigh Ewert
Senior Educational Developer (Diversity and Inclusivity)
Centre for Learning and Teaching

*@iKaylaReed. “A- always center the impacted L- listen & learn from those who live in the oppression L- leverage your privilege Y-yield the floor.” Twitter. June 13, 2016, 3:32 a.m.

Register for the waitlist

*Regististration is limited to 50 participants

November 24: Effective teaching/evaluation of remote physics labs (Lunch & Learn)

Date: Tuesday November 24, 2020
Time: 12-1 p.m.
Online via Teams Meeting (An invitation to the Teams Meeting will be sent to participants no later than 1-hour prior to the event.)

Presenter

Dr. Simon de Vet
Physics and Atmospheric Science
Dalhousie University

With the transition to online teaching, introductory physics labs were a challenge. How can 500+ first-year students learn proper experimental lab skills if they can't enter the lab? How can we consistently evaluate this work and provide feedback? I decided to develop experiments that could be completed at home using household items at no cost. Without expensive equipment, students can still learn about data collection, uncertainties, graphing and analysis, and develop meaningful conclusions. Student work would be submitted and graded online.

In this presentation I'll discuss all aspects of the online lab - development of six new experiments, providing instruction at a distance, offering help, digital submission of reports, and online rubric grading by a team of eight teaching assistants.

Lunch & Learn sessions are informal interactive sessions that begin with a short presentation followed by a group discussion of the topic. Please feel free to bring your lunch, and be prepared to turn on your mic and/or camera for an engaging discussion!

November 18: MH101: Recognize and Responding to Students in Distress

This webinar is limited to Dalhousie faculty, instructors, and staff

Wednesday, November 18
4 to 6 p.m.
Online via Teams Meetings

In any given year 1 in 5 Canadians will experience a mental illness, and according to Statistics Canada youth aged 15-24 are the most likely group to suffer the effects of a mental illness, substance dependency and suicide.  Considering most university students are within this age group it is essential that those working with University students are provided the necessary knowledge and resources to recognize and respond to students in distress.

MH101 is a short yet informative presentation developed for university faculty and staff to increase awareness and understanding of mental illness and mental health problems, thus increase your confidence in supporting students.  MH101 will be delivered jointly by Joanne Mills, a Psychologist with Student Health & Wellness and two Stay Connected Peer Support workers who are students themselves.

November 12: Feedback on your teaching: How to use and cope with the good and bad

November 12, 2020 | 12-1 p.m. | Online via Collaborate Ultra

Receiving feedback is an essential part of the teaching process for all instructors, teaching assistants, markers, and lab demonstrators. While this feedback is important for developing your teaching skills, it can also be overwhelming, discouraging, and hurtful. How do you stay motivated when facing critical feedback and balancing your own course work and the demands of life?

Join us for a lunch and learn where will we discuss ways to cope with critical and negative teaching feedback, and strategies for identifying what feedback is helpful for your teaching development. Hear about dealing with the good, the bad, and the ugly from:

  • Counselling Services
  • Centre for Learning and Teaching
  • Experience TAs

The session will focus on lab-based teaching primarily.

November 3: MH101: Recognize and Responding to Students in Distress (TA Session)

This webinar will focus on resources for TAs

Tuesday, November 3
3 to 5 p.m.
Online via Teams Meetings

In any given year 1 in 5 Canadians will experience a mental illness, and according to Statistics Canada youth aged 15-24 are the most likely group to suffer the effects of a mental illness, substance dependency and suicide.  Considering most university students are within this age group it is essential that those working with University students are provided the necessary knowledge and resources to recognize and respond to students in distress.

MH101 is a short yet informative presentation developed for university teaching assistants to increase awareness and understanding of mental illness and mental health problems, thus increase your confidence in supporting students.  MH101 will be delivered jointly by Joanne Mills, a Psychologist with Student Health & Wellness and two Stay Connected Peer Support workers who are students themselves.

October 26: Academic Integrity: Ask Away!

Date: Monday, October 26, 2020
Time: 12—1 p.m.
Location: Online via Collaborate Ultra

Many questions about academic integrity have arisen during the move to online course delivery.  This informal session gives participants the opportunity to ask questions and share experiences related to any aspect of academic integrity.  Our panel of experts will be available to answer your questions and (hopefully) demystify the academic integrity process.

Panelists

Dr. Margie Clow Bohan, Director, Writing Centre
Bob Mann, Manager of Discipline and Appeals
Anne Matthewman, Associate Dean Learning & Teaching, Dalhousie Libraries
Dr. Justin Roberts, Academic Integrity Officer, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants in the morning of the session. 

October 20: MH101: Recognize and Responding to Students in Distress

This webinar is limited to Dalhousie faculty, instructors, and staff

Tuesday, October 20
10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Online via Teams meetings

In any given year 1 in 5 Canadians will experience a mental illness, and according to Statistics Canada youth aged 15-24 are the most likely group to suffer the effects of a mental illness, substance dependency and suicide.  Considering most university students are within this age group it is essential that those working with University students are provided the necessary knowledge and resources to recognize and respond to students in distress.

MH101 is a short yet informative presentation developed for university faculty and staff to increase awareness and understanding of mental illness and mental health problems, thus increase your confidence in supporting students.  MH101 will be delivered jointly by Joanne Mills, a Psychologist with Student Health & Wellness and two Stay Connected Peer Support workers who are students themselves.

October 20: Supervising Graduate Students Remotely

Date: Tuesday, October 20, 2020
Time: 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Online via Collaborate Ultra

Supervising graduate students is an important and rewarding activity for many faculty members. How does the move to remote working and learning, affect these important relationships? In this panel we will discuss topics related to how the move to remote learning has impacted and changed the supervisory relationship, ways to promote good communication while online, and how to support graduate students in this new learning environment.   

Panelists

Dr. Megan Aston, School of Nursing
Dr. Jerry Bannister, Department of History and the Marine Affairs Program
Dr. Sophia Stone, Department of Biology

Moderator

Dr. Marty Leonard, Faculty of Graduate Studies

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants in the morning of the session. 

 

October 15: Safer Spaces | Courageous Conversations: Support for TAs Navigating an Online Environment

Date: Thursday, October 15, 2020
Time: 1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
Online via Collaborate Ultra

TAs may find themselves in uncomfortable situations when difficult topics are brought up in their teaching. This session will offer suggestions on how to respond to difficult conversations or inappropriate comments in the online environment. Topics that will be discussed include the unique role of TAs, how the online environment influences these conversations, and the Dalhousie supports that are available for TAs.

Presenters

Amina Abawajy and Lisa Delong, Human Rights and Equity Services

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants in the morning of the session. 

September 21: Introverted Teaching

Robyn Moore
Robyn Moore, MA
Educational Developer (Students)
Centre for Learning and Teaching

Introverts are often considered shy, reserved, and passive. These are not traits that are usually associated with great teaching. Too often we think that teachers should be outgoing, spontaneous, and be natural performers in order to maintain student interest. However, introverts can also be great teachers without having to change their personality. This session will discuss challenges that introverts face while teaching (specifically online), the strengths of introverts,and how to use these strengths in your teaching.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants in the morning of the session. 

August 26: The Online Opportunity: A New Perspective in Student Engagement

Wednesday, August 26, 2020
1-1:45 p.m.
Online via Collaborate


Dr. Christina Raphaëlle Haldane
Assistant Professor
Applied Voice Fountain School of Performing Arts
Dalhousie University

Classical soprano Dr. Christina Haldane will discuss her experiences with designing a new course for our online environment. As a performer, she has relied on an in-person perspective in the past, alongside her course design, to foster student engagement when working face-to-face in her academic courses. She'll be sharing her insights on how a shift to the online environment can be viewed as an opportunity to explore new ways to increase student engagement, such as an organized course flow, bite-sized video segments, specialized software for experiential learning and participation strategies.

Biography

Dr. Christina Raphaëlle Haldane is a Canadian British soprano who enjoys an active performing career in the UK, Europe, Asia and North America. She has sung principal roles in opera houses internationally, including Finnish National Opera, Royal Opera House Covent Garden, Scottish Opera, and Musica Viva Hong Kong. An accomplished concert performer, she has performed with many renowned orchestras, and tours regularly with recital and chamber music repertoire. In 2019 she completed a DMA in Voice Performance at the University of Toronto. In addition to her performing and academic work, Christina is in demand as a voice teacher internationally, in both studio and masterclass settings. Dr. Haldane is an Assistant Professor in Applied Voice at Dalhousie University's Fountain School of Performing Arts.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants in the morning of the session. 

August 14: My Online Teaching Experience: Maintaining Student Expectations and Engagement in a Virtual World

Friday, August 14, 2020
11-11:45 a.m.
Online via Collaborate


Dr. Srini Sampalli
Professor and National 3M Teaching Fellow
Faculty of Computer Science

In this session, I would like to share my recent experience in transitioning from face-to-face traditional teaching, which I love, to an online platform. Many of us had to quickly adapt to a major upheaval in the way we deliver lectures, assess student performance, and keep them engaged without our physical presence. To my surprise, I was able to retain close to 100% attendance and engagement in my online delivery to a class of 170 students. While I am used to getting excellent SRI ratings for my in-person teaching, I was pleasantly surprised to get an equally good rating for my online delivery with comments from students like: “… has done a terrific job … handled the transition to online delivery really well. … way of teaching is amazing”.

So, what did I do right? I believe there is no magic bullet for successful transitioning to online delivery, but it is a package that consists of our careful preparation, enthusiastic delivery and engagement, and showing a caring attitude towards our students even in a virtual world. I will share some simple strategies that have worked for me, including online assessment techniques that have not only maintained good integrity but also made it a pleasant experience for the students.

Speaker Bio

Dr. Srini Sampalli is a Professor and National 3M Teaching Fellow in the Faculty of Computer Science, Dalhousie University, and brings with him 25 years of teaching and research experience in computer science, with specialization in cyber security and wireless technologies.  Deeply passionate about teaching and sharing knowledge, Srini’s primary joy is in inspiring and motivating students. Srini has received the Dalhousie Faculty of Science Teaching Excellence award, the Dalhousie Alumni Association Teaching award, and the Association of Atlantic Universities' Distinguished Teacher Award, a named teaching award instituted by the students of his Faculty, the Outstanding Educator Award by the IEEE Canada Atlantic Section, and the National 3M Teaching Fellowship. Since September 2016, he holds the honorary position of the Vice President (Canada), of the International Federation of National Teaching Fellows (IFNTF).

August 12: DIY Captions in Panopto: From Beginner to Advanced

Wednesday, August 12
11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Online via Teams Live Events

In order to make audio and video media more accessible, including to students who are deaf or hard of hearing, instructors may choose to add captions to their audio and video materials. In this one-hour workshop, participants will learn how to add captions using Panopto, Dalhousie’s approved and supported audio/video creation and streaming platform.

In the first part of the workshop, workshop participants will see a short demonstration of (1) how to add automatic captions (machine-generated) to audio/videos created in or uploaded to Panopto and (2) how to edit those automatic captions in the Panopto interface in order to improve their accuracy. After each demonstration, workshop participants will have the opportunity to practice with their own videos.

The second half of the workshop will be interactive demonstrations on advanced editing processes, including:

  • Making edits directly to .srt caption files (may be easier when captioning longer audio/videos)
  • Captioning videos that have been edited in Panopto
  • Uploading and attaching caption files created outside of Panopto (such as with Microsoft Stream)

As the first part of this workshop is hands-on, participants are expected to come to the session with an audio or video file already uploaded to Panopto. Instructions on how to do that are available at the following links:

Accessing Panopto through Brightspace [0:46, no audio]

How to Upload Audio or Video to Panopto [1:54, CC]

How to Record Your Screen in Panopto [2:41, CC]

How to Record a PowerPoint in Panopto [2:14, CC]

Note: We will be using Teams to host this online workshop, as it allows for participants to use live captioning. There will be time for questions and answers throughout the workshop.

Presenters

Les T. Johnson is an Educational Developer with the Centre for Learning and Teaching with a focus on eLearning. His scholarly interests include online teaching, equity and accessibility, and intersections of identity. He captions every video he creates.

Michelle McDonald is a Learning Technologies Specialist with Academic Technology Services. She supports the use of Brightspace and other instructional technologies as a trainer. She is Dalhousie’s Panopto Administrator.

Moderator

Tereigh Ewert is a Senior Educational Developer (Diversity and Inclusivity) with the Centre for Learning and Teaching. She collaborates with faculty and instructional staff to create inclusive relationships, curricula, content, assessment, activities, and environments.

Register

* Registration will close on August 11th at 5 p.m.

August 6: I Did It... And So Can You!

Thursday, August 6, 2020
11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Online via Collaborate

Amira Tawashy
Amira Tawashy
School of Occupational Therapy
Dalhousie University

In this session, Amira Tawashy, an instructor in the School of Occupational Therapy shares how she adapted her high-enrolment (n = 130 students), lecture and exam-based graduate course in neuroscience for online delivery. Strategies included “chunking up” traditional two hour lectures into shorter pieces; strategically interspersing interactive modules and videos with the required lecture content; re-designing the course assessments to include a discussion board and a scaffolded project; and building community through voiceover videos, personal anecdotes, and synchronous tutorials.  Amira will discuss how moving away from the black and whiteness of high-stakes tests and into the flexibility of low stakes quizzes, autonomy and self-direction in terms of project selection and presentation, and active learning created a successful learning environment. 

Presenter

Amira Tawashy graduated with her OT degree from Dalhousie University and Masters of Science degree from UBC.  Though Amira has 15 years of clinical experience working with individuals who have sustained spinal cord injuries and traumatic brain injuries, most of her current work focuses on wheelchair provision in under-resourced settings.  Amira currently teaches in the Occupational Therapy program at Dalhousie University and travels with the Walkabout Foundation to provide wheelchairs and wheelchair education to individuals living in Eastern Africa.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants one hour prior to the start of the session.

Register

COURSE: Foundations in Online Course Design, May 19-July 17

Course Modality
Delivered online for Dalhousie faculty members and instructors. All course materials are available on demand, in an asynchronous format. Course available beginning May 19, 2020, with new modules opening every week for nine weeks.

Course Description
This course will allow you opportunities to learn, practice, and implement evidence-based online course design and teaching practices grounded in the principles of Universal Design for Learning. Our hope is that by the end of the course, you will be able to create and facilitate online courses that results in learners who are purposeful and motivatedresourceful and knowledgeable, and strategic and goal-directed.

Through a UDL lens, the course will emphasize:

  1. Alignment of learning outcomes, activities, and assessments,
  2. Establishing and maintaining online presence and interaction, and  
  3. Creating an organized and accessible course space that takes advantage of the digital environment.  

Other topics will include managing your workload when teaching online, active learning, inclusive assessment, instructional technologies, and evidence-based course revision. 

Asynchronous delivery refers to the absence of live instructor-led events.

To Join This Course
To self-enrol in Foundations in Online Course Design, log into Brightspace. Once logged in, navigate to the Academic Support menu and choose Self Registration. The course is listed under "CLT.FOCD CLT - Foundations in Online Course Design.

INSTRUCTORS

Bianca D. Goree, BSc, BEd, MBA Candidate
Educational Developer (eLearning)
Bianca Goree is a technology education professional with over ten years of experience developing, supporting, and delivering online education within the corporate sector. She has developed numerous e-learning courses, online learning paths, hands-on virtual application training, online webinars/workshops, and interactive videos for on-demand consumption. Her expertise is in generating a full end-to-end curriculum consumed and delivered through online channels.

Les T. Johnson, PhD
Educational Developer (eLearning)
Les T. Johnson is an Educational Developer at CLT with a portfolio focused on online pedagogy, UDL and inclusivity, and quality course design. He teaches courses in accessibility in online learning, social foundations of education, and 2SLGBTQ+/gender studies.

July 29: Beyond Imagination: The Fierce Urgency to Reclaim the Heart of Education Using a Trauma-Informed Lens


Mays Imad

Date: Wednesday, July 29
Time: 12-1:30 p.m. AT
Online via Collaborate

In order to be able to help students, we need to first be able to recognize trauma in ourselves. This session will address the impact of the ongoing pandemic and the long-ignored calls for racial justice on our sense of self and overall well-being. What lessons can we learn from neuroscience to help us better negotiate the pain and anxiety? How can we leverage the healing power of the community to help us move forward and help ourselves and our students continue to learn and thrive? This workshop will interrogate what it means to teach for purpose and empowerment in times of trauma.

Presenter

Mays Imad is a neuroscientist and the founding coordinator of the teaching and learning center at Pima Community College, Tucson, Arizona, where she studies stress and emotions and their effect on students’ learning.

Register

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants one hour prior to the start of the session.

July 16: Turning it Around: Taking Experiential Learning Online

Date: July 16
Time: 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Online via Collaborate

Simulations-based experiential learning activities and learner assessment are deeply integrated into the curricula of the health professions at Dalhousie University, and are primarily delivered through the Centre for Collaborative Clinical Learning and Research (C3LR). When COVID 19 forced a pause to in-person learning, the C3LR had to move quickly to re-design programming for its stakeholders’ learners (Faculties of Medicine, Health & Dentistry). Drawing on the diverse skill sets and background of its team members, the C3LR has moved to delivering experiential learning online, learning and innovating as we go. We look forward to sharing what we have learned in this challenging online teaching and learning context and answering any questions you might have.

Presenters

John Kyle, Simulation Technologist, C3LR
Cate Ratcliffe, Simulated Patient Educator, C3LR
Jacquie Thillaye, Simulated Patient Educator, C3LR

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants one hour prior to the start of the session.

July 14: Assessment Design and Integrity in Large Classes

Tuesday, July 14, 2020
3:00 - 4:00 p.m. AT
Online via Collaborate

The recent move to online delivery for university classes has posed many unique considerations for all instructors; but the shift has been especially challenging for those teaching large-enrolment courses, as is often the case in foundational and core courses in STEM. Often, a single instructor with little TA support, is expected to instruct and assess hundreds of students. The sheer volume of assessments means that many of these classes have traditionally relied on face-to-face, proctored, multiple-choice tests that could be automatically graded. The shift to online, non-proctored, open-book, forms of assessments means that instructors of these large classes have had to rethink their approach to testing.

In this session, panelists will discuss their experience teaching large, online courses and their approaches to assessments, with a focus on academic integrity, learning outcomes, and managing workload.

Panelists

Dr. Sarah Elaine Eaton, University of Calgary, Werklund School of Education, is a faculty member and researcher specializing in academic integrity and plagiarism prevention. Dr. Eaton’s research is strongly interdisciplinary and includes scholarly investigations and action research on topics relating to educational leadership, academic integrity, language learning and educational technology.

Dr. Jennifer Stamp, University Teaching Fellow at Dalhousie University is an instructor in Psychology and Neuroscience and is responsible for teaching several large classes (enrollments 150-1000 students). Jen is also the co-creator of the online versions of Introduction to Psychology & Neuroscience at Dalhousie (established in 2013, annually have enrollment of 150+).

Dr. Angela Crane, Senior Instructor, Dalhousie University is the coordinator of, and instructor for, Introduction to Chemistry (enrollment ~1400). Angela is working this summer to convert Introduction to Chemistry I & II to an online format for the upcoming fall term.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants one hour prior to the start of the session.

July 14: Being Present While Staying Distant: Strategies for Cultivating an Online Presence as a TA

Tuesday, July 14, 2020
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Online via Collaborate

Building rapport and fostering connections with students is one of the most rewarding aspects of being a TA. Chatting with students while they work in groups or answering questions during tutorial help us to engage with our students on a personal level. Now that we are in the online environment, how can we create these connections when we don’t see our students every week? This session will outline strategies on how TAs can cultivate an online presence and how having a strong online presence will help TAs to build rapport and engage with students in online classes.

Presenter

Robyn Moore, MA
Educational Developer (Students)
Centre for Learning and Teaching

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants one hour prior to the start of the session.

July 9: Teaching Online with International Students: Creating Engaging and Effective Online Classrooms for Culturally Diverse Learners

Date: Thursday, July 9, 2020
Time: 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Online via Collaborate

In this presentation participants will learn about creating an online community within their classrooms as well as the tools and considerations that can help make the online classroom experience effective for both instructors and learners from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.  This presentation will discuss fostering an online environment that encourages student engagement and trust, methods of monitoring student work, using UDL to create an online environment that supports international students while improving access for everyone, and techniques for transferring classroom content from the traditional classroom to the online environment.

Presenters

Laura Herrera, M.Ed
Instructor, ESL (English as a Second/Additional Language) Programs
Dalhousie University College of Continuing Education

Darren Downing, Ed.D.
Instructor, ESL (English as a Second/Additional Language) Programs
Dalhousie University College of Continuing Education

June 29: Welcoming Students to Your Online Course

Monday, 29 June 2020
10:00 - 10:45 am
Online via Collaborate

Presenters: 
Dr. Susan Joudrey, Senior Educational Developer (Curriculum), Centre for Learning and Teaching
Dr. Mabel Ho, Curriculum Developer, Centre for Learning & Teaching and Faculty of Graduate Studies

Description:
While it may be second nature to say hello and greet students to your face-to-face class, how can you build rapport in the online environment?  

Join us in this webinar to discuss strategies for welcoming students to your online course. Participants will be able to apply effective techniques for their courses and develop ways to maintain rapport throughout the term.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to the registration list one hour prior to the start of the session.

June 25: Faculty Mental Health and COVID-19

Offered jointly by Human Resources and the Centre for Learning and Teaching

Date: June 25, 2020
Time: 9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.

These unprecedented times may lead to feelings of uncertainty, disquiet, stress, noticing anxiety for the first time, or increases in anxiety that was already there. Working to get your teaching online, keep your research program on track, and possibly carrying increased administrative responsibilities, all from home, might lead to issues with: being present at work, decreased productivity despite desire to be productive, and how to manage other responsibilities (e.g., childcare).

There is concern that this is unsustainable and could lead to burnout. Dr. Pencer will discuss these concerns, as well as concrete tips for managing stress during these difficult times. In addition, Dr. Pencer will discuss the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health in the short term and the long term and provide resources for anyone that might be experiencing anxiety and depression.

Our Presenter:  Dr. Alissa Pencer is a Senior Instructor within the Departments of Psychology and Neuroscience and Psychiatry at Dalhousie University, a Registered Psychologist, and an Affiliated Scientist with the IWK Health Centre and the Nova Scotia Health Authority (NSHA). Dr. Pencer is also a Co-founder and Senior Scientific Director for an internet-based CBT company out of Nova Scotia (Tranquility Online). Her clinical and research interests are in the areas of prevention and treatment of anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive and related disorders, severe mental illness, and substance use in youth and young adults.

June 23: Cultivating Conversation: Engaging students in meaningful online discussion

Date: Tuesday, June 23, 2020
Time: 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Online via Collaborate

Presenter:
Dr. Karen Gallant, Assistant Professor, Recreation and Leisure Studies, School of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Health, Dalhousie University

Description:
This session will focus on sharing our collective experiences in cultivating conversation—that is, interactive, dynamic, meaningful communication among students in undergraduate courses using the discussion function in Brightspace.

The following topics will be addressed:

-Logistic of online discussion - group size, purpose, frequency, and evaluation
-Linking online discussion to other aspects of the course (i.e., readings, in-class discussion, independent student work)
-TA/instructor roles in cultivating conversation
-Getting to “conversation” - strategies to encourage engagement

There will be time for questions and discussion, so please bring your own questions and experiences related to online discussion.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to the registration list one hour prior to the start of the session. 

Karen Gallant, Assistant Professor, Health and Human Performance

Karen is a faculty member in Recreation and Leisure Studies within the School of Health and Human Performance. Along with her research interests related to the role of community-based recreation settings and experiences in facilitating social inclusion, she is interested in the scholarship of teaching, and particularly innovations in experiential learning. She is a CLT Faculty Associate, and received the Faculty of Health Teaching Excellence Award in 2018.

June 16: Laboratory Learning Online

Date: Tuesday, June 16th
Time: 2:00 p.m. - 3:00 p.m.
Online via Collaborate

Faculty Presenters: 

  • Dr. Jennifer MacDonald, Dalhousie University, Chemistry
  • Dr. Katherine Darvesh, Mount Saint Vincent University, Chemistry
  • Dr. Jason Loxton, Cape Breton University, Geology
  • Katelyn MacNeil, MSc., St. Francis Xavier University, Biology

This session will explore different ways laboratory learning outcomes can be achieved in online/remote courses. Experienced faculty panelists will share the important questions that guided their course design choices and examples of how they moved learning out of the laboratory.

Panelists have experience with:

  • Home labs
  • 3D Models
  • Emulated field experiences
  • Simulations
  • Virtual labs

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants one hour prior to the start of the session.

This event is part of the "Going Online Together: A Technology-Enabled Learning Committee Event Series."

The COVID-19 state of lockdown has Nova Scotia post-secondary institutions considering online course offerings over the summer and possibly into the fall of 2020.

To foster community and support for this rapidly evolving reality, the Technology Enabled Learning Committee, a multi-stakeholder group representing institutions across the province, is offering a series of webinars to connect faculty currently working on developing online coursework.

These events will provide an opportunity for faculty to ask questions to peers who have experience in using technology in their practice. The panel will feature faculty members from institutions across Canada.

The format of these webinars will be mainly Q/A. The panelists will provide an introduction of their practice as it relates to online course delivery and design, and moderators will facilitate attendees' questions via Padlet and visuals.

If you have any questions, feel free to email chad.obrien@dal.ca

June 15: Tech Savvy: What are the tools every instructor should know about?

A Dalhousie Academic Integrity Week Event

Date: Monday, June 15
Time: 10:00 am - 11:00 am
Online via Collaborate 

Lead: Vivian Howard

Panelists:
Marc Comeau, ATS - will speak about Respondus Monitor
Brian Lesser, Agriculture - will speak about Urkund
Tom Duck, Physics
Rohan Maitzen, English

Instructors have access to technological tools to help them monitor their students’ work and identify potential academic integrity concerns. Two key tools are available for every Brightspace course site: the originality checking software Urkund and the automated online proctor Respondus Monitor.  

This session will explore the strengths and weaknesses of these tools and will also discuss some of the various online tools and websites that students are prone to use and misuse, as well as strategies for detecting this misuse.  There will be an opportunity for participants to share their experiences and awareness of other tools.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants in the morning of the session. 

June 12: Online Studio Based Learning

Date: Friday, June 12
Time: 2 p.m. - 3 p.m. 
Online via Collaborate

This session will focus on preparing to move studio-based learning coursework to online formats. For purposes of this session studio-based learning is intended to be broad and encompass architecture, design, engineering, and creative and performing arts or any coursework which applies principles of studio to delivering coursework. Panelists will share their experiences with using online platforms to foster community, support remote collaborative activity and provide feedback to students. Also of focus will be course planning and design for online studio-based coursework.

Presenters:

  • Julius Poncelet Manapul, OCAD University, Drawing & Painting
  • Joe Norris, Brock University, Dramatic Arts
  • Sebastian Tory-Pratt, NSCAD, Design


Going Online Together: A Technology Enabled Learning Committee Event Series 

The COVID-19 state of lockdown has many post-secondary institutions considering online course offerings over the summer and possibly into the fall of 2020.   
  
To foster community and support for this rapidly evolving reality, the Technology Enabled Learning Committee, a multi-stakeholder group representing institutions across the province, is offering a series of webinars to connect faculty currently working on developing online coursework.  
  
These events will provide an opportunity for faculty to ask questions to peers who have experience in using technology in their practice. The panel will feature faculty members from institutions across Canada.   
 
The format of these webinars will be mainly Q/A.  The panelists will provide an introduction of their practice as it relates to online course delivery and design, and moderators will facilitate attendees' questions via Padlet and visuals. 

If you have any questions, feel free to email chad.obrien@dal.ca

June 12: Academic Integrity Week Informal Q & A / Wrap-up

A Dalhousie Academic Integrity Week Event

Date: Friday, June 12
Time: 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Online via Collaborate 

Lead: Bob Mann

Panelists:
Jill McSweeney-Flaherty, Centre for Learning and Teaching
Margie Clow Bohan, Writing Centre
Anne Matthewman, Libraries
Catherine Gunn, School of Health Sciences
Justin Roberts, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences 

This informal drop-in session wraps up Academic Integrity Week and gives participants the opportunity to ask questions related to any of the sessions presented over the week and share experiences related to any aspect of Academic Integrity.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants in the morning of the session. 

June 12: Can the Writing Centre Help Your Students Avoid Plagiarism?

A Dalhousie Academic Integrity Week Event

Date: Friday, June 12
Time: 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Online via Collaborate 

Lead: Margie Clow Bohan

Panelists: 
Adam Auch and Janice MacDonald-Eddington, Dalhousie Writing Centre

We learn through writing (e.g., diagrams on white boards, exercises, labs, reflections, practice questions, papers). Students display increasing competence in fields through texts, and evaluation of course learning outcomes is accomplished through writing (research papers, take-home exams, and exams). 

This session will allow participants to learn more about good (i.e., appropriate) writing practices, better ways to assess written work, and the support offered by the Writing Centre that is available to improve student writing. (Answer: Yes, we can help.)

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants in the morning of the session. 

June 11: Troubleshooting research: Tools & Tips from the Libraries for maintaining academic integrity and preventing accidental plagiarism

A Dalhousie Academic Integrity Week Event

Troubleshooting research: Tools & Tips from the Libraries for maintaining academic integrity and preventing accidental plagiarism

Date: Thursday, June 11
Time: 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Online via Collaborate 

Lead: Anne Matthewman

Panelists:
Deborah Hemming, Louise Gillis and Allison Fulford, Dalhousie Libraries

Dalhousie’s Libraries have many tools to assist students with identifying and avoiding plagiarism as they use research resources to prepare papers and assignments.

In this session, librarians from Dal Libraries will review library supports available for helping students navigate academic integrity, including consultations with liaison librarians and the various tutorials, subject guides, videos, and quizzes they have developed to help students.  These include information on paraphrasing, proper citation, copyright and fair dealing.  They will talk about how Dalhousie Libraries can help students better understand what constitutes plagiarism and how to ensure academic integrity.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants in the morning of the session. 

June 9: Creative ideas for designing assessments to minimize academic integrity offences

A Dalhousie Academic Integrity Week Event

Date: Tuesday, June 9
Time: 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Online via Collaborate

Lead: Joy Galloway-Jones

Panelists: 
Vilis Nams, Agriculture
Jill McSweeney-Flaherty, Centre for Learning and Teaching

Instructors will gain insight on converting strong learning outcomes into creative assessments.  Utilizing low stake assessments and scaffolding can lower incidence of academic integrity offences and can make teaching and learning more engaging and enjoyable for both the instructor and the learners. There will be an opportunity to brainstorm, and participants will leave with some resources and idea starters to help build robust online learning experiences that encourage academic honesty.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants in the morning of the session. 

June 8: I Suspect an Academic Integrity Violation in My Course: What Am I In For?

A Dalhousie Academic Integrity Week Event

Date: Monday, June 8
Time: 1 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Online via Collaborate 

Lead: Bob Mann

Panelists:
Justin Roberts, Faculty of Arts sand Social Sciences
Khurram Aziz, Faculty of Computer Science
Robin Parker, Libraries and Senate Disciplinary Committee member
Susan Holmes, College of Continuing Education and Chair of the Senate Disciplinary Committee

Anyone can read Dalhousie’s policies on how an academic integrity matter will be handled, but no policy can paint a clear picture of the experience an instructor might have when bringing a case forward. 

In this session, Bob Mann, Manager of Discipline and Appeals for the Senate, will lead a panel of two Academic Integrity Officers, Justin Roberts, FASS; Khurram Aziz, FCS, and two members of the Senate Discipline Committee, Susan Holmes, CCE and Robin Parker, Libraries, in walking participants through what can be expected at the faculty and Senate levels.

The discussion will include what should happen, what could happen, and some general advice on the best way to approach what can sometimes be a challenging and uncomfortable process.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants in the morning of the session. 

June 5: Dalhousie Language Teaching Retreat

We are pleased to invite you to our Third-Annual Dalhousie Language Teaching Retreat!

Please join us for two collaborative and instructive online sessions!

Guest speakers will be sharing their knowledge and expertise in an interactive, informative and supportive way.

When: Friday, June 5, 2020

Time:

  • 9:00 am to 10:30 am. Reyes Llopis-Garcia, Colombia University, Latin American and Iberian Culture LAIC, will lead a session entitled Grammar instruction and applied cognitive linguistics: Natural pedagogical allies.
  • 10:30-11:00. Break
  • 11:00 am to 12:30 pm. Tracy Franz, of the Dalhousie University ESL Programs, will lead a panel discussion and practical online language teaching workshop called Transitioning to Online Language Teaching: A Case Study, focusing on the challenges around assessment, academic integrity, and development of speaking skills in online language teaching. 

The event will be held on Zoom. Please contact the coordinators for the webinar link. 

Contacts:

Magali Dam-Mazzi Magali.Dam-Mazzi@Dal.Ca

Taghrid Abou-Hassan Taghrid.AbouHassan@Dal.Ca

June 2: Teaching Math and Stats Online

Date: Tuesday, June 2
Time: 2 p.m. - 3 p.m.

Panelists:

Geneviève Boulet, Mount Saint Vincent University
Lorie-Ann Mills, Jordan Simms, Nova Scotia Community College
Geoffrey Lee-Dadswell, Cape Breton University

This session will provide an opportunity for faculty to ask questions related to teaching math and statistics to faculty who have done this work in an online context.

This panel will discuss:
· teaching tips and tricks for instructing both math and statistics online
· leveraging different online tools for course delivery
· preparing online materials for math and statistics learning, students’ interaction, lesson planning, online classroom management, etc.

A link to join via Collaborate will be emailed to participants one hour prior to the start of the session.

This event is part of the "Going Online Together: A Technology-Enabled Learning Committee Event Series."

The COVID-19 state of lockdown has Nova Scotia post-secondary institutions considering online course offerings over the summer and possibly into the fall of 2020.

To foster community and support for this rapidly evolving reality, the Technology Enabled Learning Committee, a multi-stakeholder group representing institutions across the province, is offering a series of webinars to connect faculty currently working on developing online coursework.

These events will provide an opportunity for faculty to ask questions to peers who have experience in using technology in their practice. The panel will feature faculty members from institutions across Canada.

The format of these webinars will be mainly Q/A.  The panelists will provide an introduction of their practice as it relates to online course delivery and design, and moderators will facilitate attendees' questions via Padlet and visuals.

If you have any questions, feel free to email chad.obrien@dal.ca

May 20: Labs @ Home - Tips and Strategies for Developing Online Labs

 

Date: Wednesday, May 20, 2020
Time: 11:00am - 12:00pm

Presenter:
Jennifer Van Dommelen is a Senior Instructor in the Department of Biology and a CLT Faculty Associate.

Description:
Though some consider them to be "the last mile"1 of distance learning, science courses -- including labs -- can be taught successfully online. In this webinar, the presenter will briefly describe her experience with developing labs in two online introductory biology courses and offer prompts and guiding questions to help you to determine which components of your lab program can work well online2.

There will be time for Q&A; colleagues with experience in teaching online labs in other subjects are welcome to attend and/or contact the presenter directly to contribute to a crowdsourced list of recommended resources. 

 

References:

1 TOPCast Episode 56: "The Last Mile": Getting STEM Online

2 Gass, G and J. Van Dommelen. 2015. Conversion Immersion: Adapting Labs for Online or On-Campus Use. Article 8 in Tested Studies for Laboratory Teaching, Volume 36 (K. McMahon, Editor). Proceedings of the 36th Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE).http://www.ableweb.org/volumes/vol-36/?art=8

Not cited: Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit Online Learning Efficacy Research Database; search keyword "lab"

May 13: Considering Self-care and Compassion as We Transition to Teaching and Learning Online

 

Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2020
Time: 10:00am - 11:00am

Presenters:
Dr. Suzanne Le-May Sheffield, Director, CLT
Raghav V. Sampangi, Instructor, Faculty of Computer Science, and Faculty Associate, CLT

Description:
As we move into the online environment over the spring and summer terms, we may be filled with excitement, but we may also experience feelings of trepidation, anxiety, and being over-whelmed. 

As we transform our face-to-face courses into online versions, with limited time available to do so and within the context of a global pandemic, what considerations should we take into account for ourselves and for our students to ensure a positive learning and teaching experience?  

Join us to consider how you can design and teach your courses within a framework that keeps self-care and compassion in mind. 

Please send your questions for consideration in advance of the session to our emails - Dr. Suzanne Le-May Sheffield or Raghav V. Sampangi. Connect with Raghav on Twitter @RaghavSampangi.

May 1: Taking your TAing Online

 

Date: Friday, May 1, 2020
Time: 1:00pm - 2:00pm

Presenter: Phillip Joy, Graduate Teaching Associate, Dalhousie CLT

Description:
Moving from a face-to-face classroom to an online environment can seem like an overwhelming change when you’re a TA. This transition will naturally require you to think differently about how you approach some of the typical TA responsibilities. In this webinar, we will provide you with some just in time tricks to help you manage TAing online.

Topics will include:

  • Considerations for synchronous and asynchronous teaching 
  • How to engage students in a virtual environment 
  • Building your online presence to enhance the student experience 
  • Managing your communication and time 

 

April 29: Going Online In STEM and the Health Sciences

 

Date: Wednesday, April 29
Time: 1:00pm - 2:00pm

Presenters:

  • Angela Crane, Faculty of Science
  • Shelley Cobbett, Faculty of Health
  • Karen Joudrey, Faculty of Health
  • Jennifer Stamp, Faculty of Science

Moderated by:

Brad Wuetherick, Executive Director, Centre for Learning and Teaching

This panel features faculty with experience teaching online and sharing their perspectives about teaching online. 

The format will be for each presenter to start off by answering two quick questions:

1) What is one thing that you think about when designing your online courses that someone new might not think about?

2) What is one approach to engaging students that you use in your own online teaching?

We will moderate discussion with participants asking questions in the chat, around topics such as:

  • How to approach creating an instructor presence in your online course
  • How to build a community between students and instructor in virtual spaces
  • How to approach ‘lecturing’ or sharing material in online spaces (including how to use video as a tool)
  • How to approach assessments for online courses

April 29: Shifting Educational Practices in a Pandemic: Exploring Synchronous Design and Assessment Strategies

 

WATCH ON YOUTUBE

Date: Wednesday, April 29
Time: 3:00pm - 4:00pm AST

Presenter: Dr. Valerie Irvine, Assistant Professor of Educational Technology, Faculty of Education, University of Victoria

Description:
In this session, participants will learn about design shifts that are necessary to consider in making the pivot to online learning. Specifically, we will discuss design opportunities for synchronous learning (e.g., live video meetings and decentralized learning pod video meets) and assessment strategies for online learning environments. We recognize sudden shifts in practice can be stressful and will focus on preparing instructors to make this shift as smoothly as possible with tried and true methods. These strategies have been used in both undergraduate and graduate courses online with successful reports from learners both anecdotally and via course experience surveys. This presentation welcomes your participation.

Please send your questions for consideration in advance of the session to my email or via Twitter.

We will also generate a shared space for documenting questions and responses during and after the session, which will be recorded.

April 28: Connections and Contexts - Building Virtual Learning Communities

 

Date: Tuesday, April 28
Time: 3:00pm - 4:00pm AST

Presenter: Dr. Richard Schwier, Associate Dean, College of Education, University of Saskatchewan

Description:

Much of what we understand about the notion of online learning communities and how they develop, grow, and die away is based on examinations of formal online learning environments— primarily post-secondary courses managed by institutions of higher learning. As effective as formal environments may be, paying exclusive attention to them limits our understanding of the nature of social learning and the formation of learning communities.  Informal learning environments can tell us a great deal about how people learn together in natural settings, and can teach us a great deal about what happens when the authority for learning is entrusted to learners. This presentation considers what we have learned about learning communities in formal and informal online environments and speculates about what is at the heart of how learners make use of social interaction for the purpose of learning.

Dr. Richard Schwier is a Professor of Educational Technology and Design, and Associate Dean in the College of Education at the University of Saskatchewan.  A 3M National Teaching Fellow, Rick has long been recognized for his teaching, educational leadership, and research related to educational technologies and the design and delivery of online courses and programs. 

April 28: Going Online In the Arts, Social Sciences, Design and Management

 

Date: Tuesday, April 28
Time: 1:00pm - 2:00pm

Presenters:

  • Joseli Macedo, Faculty of Architecture and Planning
  • Robin Oakley, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
  • Binod Sundararajan, Faculty of Management
  • Florence Tarrant, Faculty of Management

Moderated by: Brad Wuetherick, Executive Director, Centre for Learning and Teaching

This panel features faculty with experience teaching online and sharing their perspectives about teaching online. The format will be for each presenter to start off with answering two quick questions:

1) What is one thing that you think about when designing your online courses that someone new might not think about? 

2) What is one approach to engaging students that you use in your own online teaching?

We will follow up with moderating questions from participants asking questions in the chat, around topics such as:

  • How to approach creating an instructor presence in your online course
  • How to build a community between students and instructor in virtual spaces
  • How to approach ‘lecturing’ or sharing material in online spaces (including how to use video as a tool)
  • How to approach assessments for online courses

April 27: Going Online Together!

 

The COVID-19 state of lockdown has NS post-secondary institutions working hard to maintain our program offerings. In many cases this means that faculty are being compelled to consider online course delivery in a very short timeframe. 

In an attempt to foster community and support for this rapidly evolving reality, the Technology Enabled Learning Committee, a multi-stakeholder group representing institutions across the province, is offering a webinar to connect faculty currently working on developing online coursework for the Spring and Summer, or contemplating doing so for the Fall should that become necessary.  

This event will provide an opportunity for faculty to ask questions to peers who have experience in online course design and delivery. The panel will feature faculty members from institutions across NS with expertise in a range of topics such as:

  • Large online class group work and graded discussions
  • Video creation and innovative approaches to sharing content online
  • Fostering the development of community online
  • Planning for learner engagement
  • Designing coursework which is visually and conceptually engaging as a means to support learning and motivate learners

Session Details

Date: Monday, April 27
Time: 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Panellists:

  • Dr. Lyndan Warner, Saint Mary's University
  • Dr. Derek Fisher, Mount Saint Vincent University 
  • Dr Leanne Stevens, Dalhousie University
  • Paul Maher and Monika Kulesza, NSCAD University 
  • Dr. Peter MacIntyre, Cape Breton University

Moderators:

  • Chad O’Brien, Educational Developer, Dalhousie Centre for Learning and Teaching
  • Terry MacDonald, Educational Developer, CBU Centre for Teaching and Learning

 The format of this webinar will be mainly Q/A.  The panellists will provide an introduction of their practice as it relates to online course delivery and design, and moderators will facilitate attendees' questions via chat and audio.