Events

 

Upcoming Short Course

October 1-December 9: Reconcili(action): Engaging Indigenous Knowledges & Decolonial Pedagogies

This short course is limited to Dalhousie faculty members.

Instructor

Rachelle McKay, Education Developer, Indigenous Knowledges and Ways of Knowing, Centre for Learning and Teaching

Schedule

  • Tuesday 11 October, 1-3pm (on-campus)
  • Tuesday 25 October, 1-3pm (on-campus)
  • Tuesday 15 November, 1-3pm (on-campus)
  • Tuesday 29 November, 1-3pm (on-campus)
  • Tuesday 6 December, 7:30am-8:30am (land-based, location TBD)

Course Description

Taking up a resurgent-focused understanding decolonized Indigenization, this course is for faculty members interested in incorporating Indigenous knowledges and pedagogies into their course curriculums and teaching methods.

Conceptions of decolonization, decolonial practice, and Indigenous pedagogies will be offered to participants, who will then be prompted to reflexively consider their own implicated-ness in colonial epistemic violence. By the end of this course, participants will be able to identify everyday acts of decolonization that can be put into practice within their own teaching.

Through a full engagement with this non-credit course, participants should be able to:

  • articulate a deepened understanding of colonialism and decolonization
  • differentiate between and critically engage different visions of academic Indigenization
  • identify academic norms that are epistemically violent towards Indigenous peoples and Indigenous world views
  • implement everyday acts of decolonization within their teaching

Registration Cap

The capacity of this studio course is a maximum 15, including three spaces reserved for members of the Faculty Certificate Program. If you are a Faculty Certificate member, please see the Certificate Brightspace site for additional requirements for studio course credit.

Register for the short course here.

 

Before registering, please read the pre-registration help questions below.

Is this course for me?

If you are an educator looking for further guidance on how to respectfully engage Indigenous knowledges and decolonize your teaching practice, this course might be for you. However, this is not an introductory course on Indigenous perspectives. Before enrolling, participants should have some understanding that as a colonial institution, academia has historically devalued Indigenous knowledges which continue to be viewed as less intellectually rigorous. The materials in this course are complex and full participation in the course intends to incite deep reflection on one’s relationality to Indigenization and decolonization efforts within one’s respective discipline, research, and teaching.

When will the course be delivered?

This course will be delivered from October 1 – December 9, 2022 and will be offered again in Spring 2023.

What will be the method of course delivery?

This course will be delivered mostly online asynchronously but has mandatory in-person components.

What are the in-person requirements for this course?

To enroll in this course, you must be available to participate in in-person sharing circles from 1-3pm on the followings Tuesdays: Oct. 11, Oct. 25, Nov. 15, and Nov. 29.

You must also be available to attend an early morning land-based ceremony in K’jipuktuk (Halifax) on Tuesday December 6, between 7:30-8:30am.

What technologies will be used?

Brightspace will be used to store course readings and Panopto will be used to record course lectures. The in-person Indigenous ceremonial components of this course are technology-free spaces.

What are the expected tasks and activities during the week?

The course consists of five modules, each lasting two weeks in length. For each module, participants are required to read the assigned readings, watch a short lecture, post on the Brightspace discussion board, and reflect on the provided discussion prompts in preparation for each in-person session.

Does the course have grades?

There are no grades assigned for this non-credit course. All participants who attend actively engage in the online course components and attend all five synchronous in-person sessions will receive a letter of completion.

Does this count towards the Centre for Learning and Teaching’s Faculty Certificate?

Three spaces in this course are reserved for Faculty Certificate program participants. There is a separate registration process and additional requirements for studio course credit towards the Faculty Certificate Program. If you are a Faculty Certificate member, please see the Certificate Brightspace site for additional requirements for studio course credit.

 

Upcoming Webinars

September 29: Indigenous Topics and Decolonial Pedagogies

This session is open to Dalhousie participants only.

Graduate workshop

Thursday, September 29, 2022
1-2 p.m. Atlantic
Online via Teams Meetings
REGISTER


Rachelle McKay, MA (she/her)
Educational Developer (Indigenous Knowledges and Ways of Knowing)

Many courses at Dalhousie include Indigenous topics, discussions of colonialism and Indigeneity. This session aims to help guide graduate students and Teaching Assistants in their approach to such conversations and engagement with Indigenous course materials. Decolonial pedagogies will also be discussed and by the end of the session, graduate students will be able to identify decolonial strategies that can be implemented within their own student interactions and teaching practices.

October 4: Mental Health 101 - Recognizing and Responding to Students in Distress

The MH101 session is limited to faculty, instructors, and staff at Dalhousie and King's.

Tuesday, October 4, 2022
4 - 6 p.m. Atlantic
Online via Teams Meetings
Registration cap: 20
FULL*

*This session is full, please email Joanne Mills (Joanne.Mills@Dal.Ca) to be added to the waitlist.  A second offering will take place, in-person, November 18 from 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

In any given year 1 in 5 Canadians will experience a mental illness, and according to Statistics Canada youth aged 15-24 are the most likely group to suffer the effects of a mental illness, substance dependency and suicide.  Considering most university students are within this age group it is essential that those working with University students are provided the necessary knowledge and resources to recognize and respond to students in distress.

MH101 is a short yet informative presentation developed for university faculty and staff to increase awareness and understanding of mental illness and mental health problems, thus increase your confidence in supporting students.  MH101 will be delivered jointly by Joanne Mills, a Psychologist with Student Health & Wellness and two Stay Connected Peer Support workers who are students themselves.

Presenters:
Joanne Mills, Psychologist, Student Health & Wellness, and two Stay Connected Peer Support workers (who are students themselves).

October 12: Internationalization at Dalhousie: Showcase of Learning from a CLT Studio Course

Wednesday, October 12, 2022
10-11:30 a.m. Atlantic
Online via Microsoft Teams
Facilitator: Dr. Shazia Nawaz Awan Educational Developer (Internationalization & Intercultural Competency)

REGISTER

According to John Dewey’s pedagogical philosophy, we learn by doing, and our world is an ever-changing, practical world that we can only know through action. In this webinar session, participants of CLT studio course, ‘Teaching International Students (TIS): Making Learning Experience Relevant & Inclusive’ will showcase their learning as they are planning to set these learnings into action in their own work. During the 8-week course, participants worked on creating intentional and purposeful internationalized teaching and learning space for ALL students. In this 90-minute session, you will hear course participants share their plans ideas to internationalize their courses in different disciplines at Dalhousie University. We are hoping there will be take away if you are someone intends to work on internationalization related elements in your work, particularly in teaching and learning.

Presenters and Presentations

Internationalizing a graduate diploma program: Commitment to Excellence in Teaching through Inclusive Practices by Pamela Arenella, MD, Professor of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine

Teaching International Students: Commitment to Excellence in Teaching through Inclusion by Lexie Arnott, PhD., Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences

Building Graduate Attitudes Through Transformative Learning: Examples from Water Resources Course by Mahed Choudhury, Postdoctoral Fellow, School of Social Work

Teaching International Students: Internationalizing Basic Science Curriculum in Medical by Xianping Dong, Associate Professor, Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine

Culture, Language, and Internationalization: Dalhousie EAP Program by Laura Herrera Gonzalez, M.Ed., Faculty of Open Learning and Career Development (FOLCD)

How to respect cultural differences when interacting with patients/clients in healthcare by David McArthur, Instructor, Department of Kinesiology in the School of Health and Human Performance & Caitlin McArthur, Assistant Professor, Department of Physiotherapy

The International Experience: Enhancing the Classroom-Community for International and Local Students by Amy Mui, Senior Instructor & ENVS Undergraduate Advisor, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science

October 13: Intro to Culturally Responsive Pedagogy (CRP) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL)

Thursday, October 13, 2022
1-3 p.m. Atlantic
Online via Microsoft Teams
REGISTER

Culturally Responsive Pedagogy (CRP) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are learner-centered frameworks that guide course design and delivery. Although UDL does not specifically address culture, its core principles need be situated, for every learner, within their cultural framework(s). As such, many practitioners are co-implementing CRP with UDL to design and teach courses that apply decolonizing, anti-racist, and anti-oppressive theories and practices, and promote accessibility, equity, and inclusion through an intersectional lens. 

In this workshop, the facilitators will introduce the principles and philosophies of UDL and CRP through the sharing and discussion of concrete ideas for incorporating these pedagogical frameworks in their course design. Workshop participants will have a guided opportunity to revise a provided course artifact (e.g., syllabus, assignment, activity, etc.) to practice incorporating CRP and UDL. 

Facilitators

Tereigh Ewert (she/her), Senior Educational Developer (Anti-oppressive and Transformative Education)
Les T. Johnson (he/him), Educational Developer (Online Pedagogy)

October 14: Engaging Students with Videos

October 14th, 2022
10-11 a.m. Atlantic
Online via Microsoft Teams
REGISTER

In this second session in our Creating and Using Video in Online Teaching workshop series, Kate Crane from the Online Pedagogy team and other presenters will guide participants in exploring the way video can serve as an engaging and connective medium between student and content, student and student, and student and instructor. Both examples and information from the relevant literature will be shared. Facilitators will also provide helpful tips for instructor-made videos (no professional skills required!) and will highlight the student engagement capabilities of Panopto video-creation software.

Facilitator

Kate Crane (she/her), Educational Developer (Online Pedagogy)

November 1: Graduate information session : “How to collect and use students’ feedback to improve teaching and add to your teaching dossier”

This session is open to Dalhousie University participants only.

Tuesday, November 1, 2022
11 a.m.-12 p.m. Atlantic
Online via Microsoft Teams Meetings
REGISTER

Teaching is a dynamic and ever-evolving process, and students’ feedback plays an important role in improving the quality of a course and developing the instructor’s teaching skills. Students’ evaluations are usually collectedwith regards to the performance of the course instructor, and less attention has been paid to teaching assistants’ performance. Given that students’ evaluation is a required component of a teaching dossier, most teaching assistants have difficulty demonstrating their TAships performance in formal or informal ways. 

In this graduate information session, you will learn about the importance of students’ feedback in improving the quality of teaching and development of a teaching dossier. Additionally, you will learn about different ways of soliciting and collecting students’ evaluation and feedback when you are working as a teaching assistant.Facilitators

Presenters:
Betsy Keating, PhD, Educational Developer (Faculty)
Bruno Roy, Technical Administrator, Student Learning Experience Questionnaire (SLEQ)
Nasim Tavassoli, PhD, Educational Developer (Student Development)

 

November 18: Mental Health 101 - Recognizing and Responding to Students in Distress

The MH101 session is limited to faculty, instructors, and staff at Dalhousie and King's.

Friday, November 18, 2022
10 a.m. - 12 p.m. Atlantic
Killam Library, Room B400*
Registration cap: 20
REGISTER**

*This offering is currently scheduled as an in-person session, however it may be moved to an online format.
**If the session is full, please email Joanne Mills (Joanne.Mills@Dal.Ca) to be added to the waitlist.

 

In any given year 1 in 5 Canadians will experience a mental illness, and according to Statistics Canada youth aged 15-24 are the most likely group to suffer the effects of a mental illness, substance dependency and suicide.  Considering most university students are within this age group it is essential that those working with University students are provided the necessary knowledge and resources to recognize and respond to students in distress.

MH101 is a short yet informative presentation developed for university faculty and staff to increase awareness and understanding of mental illness and mental health problems, thus increase your confidence in supporting students.  MH101 will be delivered jointly by Joanne Mills, a Psychologist with Student Health & Wellness and two Stay Connected Peer Support workers who are students themselves.

Presenters:
Joanne Mills, Psychologist, Student Health & Wellness, and two Stay Connected Peer Support workers (who are students themselves).

November 21: Using Videos as and for Assessment

This session is open to Dalhousie University participants only.

Monday, November 21, 2022
2-3 p.m. Atlantic
Online via Microsoft Teams Meetings
REGISTER

In this final session of the “Creating and Using Video in Online Teaching” webinar series, Educational Developers at the CLT will present examples of and the literature around using video both as assessment (i.e., students create videos to express what they know) and for assessment (i.e., embed existing videos within student activities and assessments).

Facilitators

Elizabeth Gillis (she/her), Educational Developer (Curriculum)
Les Tyler Johnson (he/him), Educational Developer (Online Pedagogy)

CLT Webinars: Recordings and Resources

The Dalhousie community can now self-enrol in the Brightspace site. Learn how.