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Prime Minister, House of Commons salute Dalhousie

- February 6, 2018

Left: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sends well-wishes for Dal 200. Right: MP Andy Fillmore celebrates Dal in the House of Commons Monday.
Left: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sends well-wishes for Dal 200. Right: MP Andy Fillmore celebrates Dal in the House of Commons Monday.

Dalhousie’s 200 years of achievement spoke loudly in Ottawa this week.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau sent along video greetings to the university community as part of Tuesday’s Bicentennial Launch event.



“Since 1818, Dalhousie has been a model of academic excellence and a force for good in communities across Nova Scotia and around the world,” said Trudeau, who got to know Dal through the experiences of his two brothers, both of whom studied at the university.

“I saw first-hand the tremendous impact you’ve had on their lives,” said the Prime Minister.

“For generations, you’ve put students first, and they’ve gone on to shape the world for the better in every imaginable way. That takes a whole community. So to everyone here today: thank you. Nova Scotia, and Canada, are stronger because of you.”

Prime Minister Trudeau was not the only Parlimentarian to salute Dalhousie this week. Andy Fillmore, Member of Parliament for Halifax, rose in the House of Commons Monday afternoon — proudly sporting Dal colours, as an alumnus — to pay tribute to the university.



Among other things, Fillmore celebrated Dalhousie faculty members for having won Canada’s top science prize three out of the last four years, and heralded the university’s leadership in ocean research and sustainability.

"At the dawn of its third century, I invite all Canadians to congratulate Dalhousie University on its remarkable contributions to Canada and the world," said Fillmore, whose remarks inspired cheers from all gathered in the House.

Fillmore's full statement, excerpted from Hansard, is below.

Mr. Speaker, I rise today as a proud alumnus to celebrate the 200th anniversary of Dalhousie University. Dalhousie educates more Nova Scotians than any other Nova Scotian university, yet over half of its students come from elsewhere, with its student body representing over 110 countries.

When Dalhousie was established in Halifax on February 6, 1818, it was the only non-denominational school in Atlantic Canada. These founding values of diversity and inclusion still serve as a guiding force.

Today, Dalhousie is the only Atlantic Canadian member of Canada's U15, our country's most powerful research universities. Dalhousie's faculty members have won Canada's top science prize three out of the last four years.

Further, Dalhousie is a global leader in advancing our understanding of our oceans to better protect them for future generations. In 2016, our government supported this work by awarding Dalhousie $94 million to launch the Ocean Frontier Institute.

The list of distinctions is long. At the dawn of its third century, I invite all Canadians to congratulate Dalhousie University on its remarkable contributions to Canada and the world.

Afua Cooper recognized as part of Black History Month

While Dalhousie University as a whole was the subject of the Prime Minister's video greeting, one particular Dalhousian was recognized in his national statement for Black History Month.

Dr. Afua Cooper, the most recent James R. Johnston Chair in Black Canadian Studies and cross-appointed to the Departments of History and Sociology & Social Anthropology, was singled out in Prime Minister Trudeau's statement on Thursday, February 1 to mark the start of Black History Month in Canada.

"The theme for this year’s Black History Month is ‘Black Canadian Women: Stories of Strength, Courage and Vision,'" said the Prime Minister. "Jean Augustine, Viola Desmond, Michaëlle Jean, Jully Black, Afua Cooper – these are just a few women of African descent who have shaped Canada into the country it is today. Yet all too often their stories go untold."

He subsequently highlighted the Government of Canada's announcement that Canada will officially recognize the UN International Decade for People of African Descent.

Full coverage - Bicentennial Launch


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