Research

Our scientists tackle global issues

From clean energy to ocean sciences, our scientists address some of society's most pressing challenges and promising opportunities. Browse the latest research news coming from our community of 200 scientists.

Nikki Beauchamp  –  Students, Research, All News
Tuesday, September 4, 2018
During August and September, the Northwest Atlantic Ocean’s sea surface temperatures creep up to just below 20 degrees Celsius. The warm waters bring with them some cold blooded creatures: sharks.
Emma Geldart  –  Students, Research, All News
Tuesday, August 21, 2018
Over a year after a 63-foot female blue whale — the largest animal species on Earth — was sighted floating off the coast of Nova Scotia, Dal’s Gordon Price, Chris Harvey-Clark, Christopher Nelson and a team of volunteers are working to turn the loss into a learning opportunity.
Ryan McNutt  –  Research, All News
Friday, August 10, 2018
Dalhousie professor uses statistical techniques to determines authorship of long disputed Beatles favourites.
Patti Lewis  –  Research, All News
Thursday, July 12, 2018
Dalhousie Professor finds that rat control should be an urgent conservation priority on many remote tropical islands in an effort to protect coral.
Fallon Bourgeois  –  Research, All News
Thursday, July 5, 2018
Kate Pepler (BA’16) is set to open Halifax’s first zero-waste café and store this fall — the latest chapter in her deep dedication to sustainability. Environment, Sustainability and Society Science Environmental Programs Alumni
Michele Charlton, with files from Fisheries and Oceans Canada  –  Research, All News
Wednesday, June 27, 2018
New funding from the Government of Canada will support Dal researchers in protecting and restoring coastline habitats in Nunavut.
Staff  –  Research, All News
Thursday, June 21, 2018
In collaboration, a user-friendly web atlas of the Canadiana Arctic was released using Inuit traditional and current uses of the territory
Staff  –  Research, All News
Thursday, June 7, 2018
Dalhousie University scientists forecast the northern part of the Gulf of Mexico will experience a hypoxic zone, or an area of low oxygen also known as a dead-zone, about three times the size of Prince Edward Island this summer.