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Research


Revolutionizing construction with recycled tires

Dal Engineering students, faculty and alumni have teamed up study how tire derived aggregate (or "TDA") can strengthen civil engineering and construction projects.  Read more.

Featured News

Allison Gerrard
Thursday, June 30, 2016
Dalhousie Medical School researchers are investigating how common over-the-counter drugs used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders might enhance the body’s immune system and ability to fight off cancer.
Matt Reeder
Thursday, June 23, 2016
Scott Brison, president of the Treasury Board of Canada, was on campus Thursday morning to announce the latest round of funding from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), including $10.1 million in support for more than 70 Dal researchers.
Allison Gerrard
Friday, June 24, 2016
A new partnership led by Dal's Dr. Christine Chambers and Dr. Jennifer Stinson from SickKids in Toronto will bring parents the best research evidence about pediatric cancer pain.

Archives - Research

Matt Reeder
Thursday, July 21, 2016
The Honourable Dominic Leblanc, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, was on campus Thursday to announce the Government of Canada's investment in Ocean School — a new educational initiative from Dalhousie University and the National Film Board aimed at increasing ocean literacy among Canadian youth.
Jennifer Moore
Wednesday, July 20, 2016
Dal Engineering students, faculty and alumni have teamed up study how tire derived aggregate (or "TDA") can strengthen civil engineering and construction projects.
Michelle Thompson
Monday, July 4, 2016
Fresh water algae blooms can be toxic, which is why second-year Agriculture student Alexandra Warren is spending her summer studying how they affect wildlife that use local lakes as a water source.
Allison Gerrard
Thursday, June 30, 2016
Dalhousie Medical School researchers are investigating how common over-the-counter drugs used for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders might enhance the body’s immune system and ability to fight off cancer.
Michelle Thompson
Tuesday, June 28, 2016
Third-year Faculty of Agriculture student Brianna Downey is spending her summer studying peptides, short chains of proteins that can have a big impact on human health — for the better.