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Innis Christie Symposium in Labour and Employment Law


8th Annual Innis Christie Lecture & Intensive Short Course in Labour and Employment Law

For more information and to register for the lecture and the course, contact lawdean@dal.ca or call 902-494-2114. Attendance is free, but registration is required. 

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Innis Christie Lecture in Labour and Employment Law

International Labour Law Now: Towards the Transnational Governance of Work

 

Free Public Lecture: Sept. 28, 2017 | 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Innis Christie Visiting Professor Kerry Rittich
Faculty of Law, University of Toronto

 

Please RSVP by Sept. 21 to lawdean@dal.ca or 902‐494‐2114
The public lecture will be held in Room 105, Weldon Law Building
Reception to follow in the Atrium

Intensive Short Course: Current Issues in Labour & Employment Law

International Labour Law: Work and Workers' Rights from Canada to Bangaladesh

 

Innis Christie Visiting Professor Kerry Rittich
Faculty of Law, University of Toronto

 

Intensive short course: Sept. 29 and 30, 2017
Sept. 28: 4:30–6 p.m. (public lecture; attendance required)
Sept. 29: 3–7 p.m. (class) and Sept. 30: 9 a.m.–12 p.m. and 1–4 p.m.
Oct. 2: 12 a.m. (midnight) take-home assignment due


Work and workers across the globe are increasingly connected, through trade agreements,
global manufacturing supply chains, migration and the outsourcing of work. At the same time,
the new economy is producing short term contracts, "just in time" scheduling and other forms
of insecurity for workers, while global competition among firms and workers place pressure on
labour standards and workers’ associational rights.

This course is designed to survey the international and transnational norms, rules and
institutions that govern work, to trace their effects on workers and labour law in Canada and
abroad, and to examine some of the ways that different norms are now used by private actors
in a globalized economy. Throughout, we will reflect on how workers’ rights and labour market
regulation are connected to broader objectives like equality, economic growth and social justice.

What role do international labour standards, the ILO (International Labour Organization) and
other international institutions play when it comes to workers’ rights and domestic labour law?
How do corporations and private actors affect the terms and conditions of work through codes
of conduct and industry standards like the Bangladesh accord, and how do labour and social
justice activists mobilize those norms through legal and political action? Beyond labour
standards, how might trade and investment agreements like the Transpacific Trade Partnership
affect the position of workers? And how might development initiatives simultaneously advance
and weaken the position of workers and labour?

Classes will be held in Room 309, Weldon Law Building

Registration is required. Please contact lawdean@dal.ca.

7th Innis Christie Lecture in Labour and Employment Law: March 16–17, 2016

Coping with the Fissured Workplace and Precarious Employment

Free Public Lecture: March 16, 2017 | 4:30–6PM  

 

C. Michael Mitchell and the Hon. John C. Murray
Arbitrators & Mediators | Special Advisors to the Ontario “Changing Workplaces Review”


The modern workplace is changing. Many employers seek efficiencies through franchising, contracting out, hiring casual employees, and outsourcing to other countries. This is causing uncertainty for an increasing number of Canadian workers, particularly women, youth, and other vulnerable minorities. Christie lecturers Michael Mitchell and John Murray are currently advising the government of Ontario on these issues. 

Room 105, Weldon Law Building
Reception to follow in the Atrium.

The Fissured Workplace & Precarious Employment: Creative Responses for Workers, Employers and Labour Market Regulation

Free Public Symposium: March 17, 2017 | 8:45AM–4:30PM


The modern workplace is changing. Many employers seek efficiencies through franchising, contracting out, hiring casual employees, and outsourcing to other countries. This is causing uncertainty for an increasing number of Canadian workers, particularly women, youth, and other vulnerable minorities. Christie lecturers Michael Mitchell and John Murray are currently advising the government of Ontario on these issues. 

On March 17, three panels consisting of labour relations specialists will participate in the Innis Christie symposium and will examine unionized sectors, non-unionized sectors, and issues in the workplace in Atlantic Canada.

Room 104, Weldon Law Building
Registration is required (see registration form and symposium schedule).

6th Innis Christie Lecture in Labour and Employment Law: November 5–7, 2015

 

Thursday, November 5, 2015
Rm 105, Weldon Law Building

6th Innis Christie Lecture in Labour and Employment Law

6 – 7:30 pm

Christie Lecture: "Labour Regulation and Economic Development: Past, Present, and Future" with Professor Simon Deakin, Innis Christie Visiting Professor, Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge

Friday, November 6, 2015
Rm 207, Weldon Law Building

 

3 – 6 pm Class 

Saturday, November 7, 2015 

Rm 207, Weldon Law Building

 
9 am – 12 pm AND 
1 pm – 4 pm
Class

 

 

5th Annual Innis Christie Symposium: October 16–17, 2014

"Labour Rights as Human Rights: Turning Slogans into Legal Claims"

 

Thursday, October 16, 2014
Rm 105, Weldon Law Building

5th Innis Christie Lecture in Labour and Employment Law 

4:30 - 6:00 pm

Lecture: Employer Self‐Regulation: Making a Virtue of Necessity?

With Professor Cynthia Estlund (Catherine A. Rein Professor of Law, New York University School of Law).

Friday, October 17, 2014
Rm 105, Weldon Law Building

3rd Innis Christie Symposium in Labour and Employment Law
Rights and Health at Work: A Focus for Restorative Labour Market Regulation

8:45 am Introduction, Dean Kim Brooks, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University
9:00
9:00 am - 10:00 am

Session I
Workers Compensation: Pro/Re/Active Regulation of Rights and Health in the Workplace

Chair: Mr. Andrew Taillon, Nova Scotia Department of Justice
Presenters:
Ms. Wendy Griffin, Vice‐President, People and Planning, Nova Scotia Workers Compensation Board
Ms. Jessie Parkinson, Nova Scotia Federation of Labour
Ms. Mary Morris, Office of the Employer Advisor, Nova Scotia

10:00 am - 10:15 am Health Break (Room 104)
10:15 am - 11:30 am Session II
Occupational Health & Safety: Voice and Self‐Regulation for Workplace Rights and Health


Chair: Professor Lorraine Lafferty, Schulich School of Law
Presenters:
Dr. Arla Day, Canada Research Chair in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Saint Mary’s University
Professor Cynthia Estlund, New York University School of Law
Commentators:
Ms. Tara Erskine, McInnes Cooper & Mr. David Roberts, Pink Larkin
11:30 am - 12:00 noon Lunch (Room 104)
12:00 noon - 1:30 pm

Session III (co‐sponsored by the Health Law Institute, Dalhousie University)
A Patchwork Quilt: Disability Income Security Programs in Canada


Chair: Professor Sheila Wildeman, Schulich School of Law
Presenter:
Dr. Cameron Mustard, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, President, Institute for Work and Health, Toronto

1:30 pm - 1:45 pm Health Break (Room 104)
1:45 pm - 3:15 pm Session IV
Rights at Work, Health and Human Capability Development:
Assessing the Scope of Restorative Labour Market Regulation


Chair: Professor Constance MacIntosh, Schulich School of Law
Presenters:
Professor Brian Langille, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto
Professor Bruce Archibald, Q.C., Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University
Ms. Barbara Jones‐Gordon, Nova Scotia Department of Labour and Advanced Education
3:15 pm - 4:00 pm Closing Round Table Discussion: Labour Market Regulation and the Ivany Report

Chair: Professor Sarah Bradley, Schulich School of Law, Chair, Nova Scotia Securities Commission
Commentators:
Mr. Brian Johnston, Q.C., Stewart McKelvey & Mr. Ray Larkin, Q.C., Pink Larkin
4:15pm - 5:30 pm

Reception – Legal Ethics in Canada: The Christie Legacy and the Videos (co‐sponsored by the Canadian Association for Legal Ethics)

Hosts:
Professor Richard Devlin, Schulich School of Law
Professor Brent Cotter, University of Saskatchewan Law School

5:30 pm - 6:30 pm Law Annual Alumni Dinner
McInnes Room, Dalhousie Student Union Building

4th Annual Innis Christie Symposium: October 3–5, 2013

"Labour Rights as Human Rights: Turning Slogans into Legal Claims"

Keynote

Professor Judy Fudge, Fourth Innis Christie Visiting Professor in Labour and Employment Law, Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University; Lansdowne Chair in Law, University of Victoria

With introductions from Dean Kim Brooks and Professor Bruce Archibald (Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University).

Thursday, October 3, 2013
12 noon, rm 105
>  More event details

Symposium

Thursday, October 3, 2013 - 12 pm to Saturday, October 5, 2013 - 4 pm: "Current Issues in Labour & Employment Law Labour Law in the Global Economy: Canada as a Case Study, an intensive short-course" 

To register: please complete and return this form to lawdean@dal.ca
Registration Deadline:  Friday, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

  • There is no cost for this course.       
  • You will not receive Dalhousie credit for this course.   
  • This course can be considered for Continuing Professional Development.  For more information, please contact the Nova Scotia Barrister’s Society at CPD@nsbs.org.

This course will explore the extent to which the "new global economy" (global integration of production and increased migration, digital and informational technologies, transformations in work and production processes, the changing demographics of the workforce, and the shift to services) has undermined norms of employment, forms of workers organization, the traditional structure of the firm, assumptions about who workers are and what they need, and ideas about how regulation works – assumptions, norms, and techniques that have been the foundation upon which national regimes of labour regulation have been built. The specific focus will be on Canada, and we will consider changing forms of regulation (from collective bargaining to rights claims, the rise of class actions), the changing 'subjects' of labour law (women and migrant workers), and the changing goals of labour law (flexibility and competiveness versus security and protection). The course will place labour law in its social, economic, and political context.  

Broad topics to be covered include:  

  • Legal pluralism and the regulation of the labour market;
  • The informalization, feminization, and commercialization of employment;       
  • Outsourcing, off-shoring and business networking and their impact on labour law;    
  • The challenges of finding effective mechanisms for worker representation, or ‘voice’, in an era of declining union membership;       
  • Labour migration as a form of labour market regulation; and         
  • The challenges of new technology and work organization on working patterns and conditions of work. 

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to demonstrate:

  • Knowledge and understanding of the relationship between contemporary economic events and the evolution of labour law;
  • Knowledge and understanding of the debates about the future of labour law;
  • An appreciation of the significance of globalization in shaping contemporary national labour law regimes;
  • Knowledge of international influences on labour law in Canada;
  • An appreciation immigration as a source of labour market regulation;
  • Knowledge of how to identify and analyze particular legal rules and practices in light of the pressures of globalization.

You will be responsible for reading the daily assignments. Reading materials will be provided together with web-references for primary documents (conventions, treaties, cases, statutes etc). In addition to the readings, you will be asked to prepare short assignments for class discussion. In-class exercises will be interspersed with discussion of the readings. Active participation in encouraged. Come prepared and eager to test your ideas and engage each other drawing upon your knowledge and experience.  

Format:
1 credit intensive course (13 to 16 hours).  

Evaluation: 
In course assignments and a take home exam on a pass/fail basis. 

Schedule:
Thurs, Oct. 3

12:00-1:00 pm (public lecture – attendance required)
6:30- 9:30 pm (class)

Friday, Oct. 4
1:00-4:00 pm (class) and 6:00-9:00pm

Saturday, Oct. 5
9:00am-12:00pm and 1:00-4:00pm (class)

Location: Classes will be held in the Weldon Law Building, Room TBD, and the public lecture will be in Room 105.

3rd Annual Innis Christie Symposium: September 28–29, 2012

"Labour and Employment Law: Revisiting a North American Distinction from a European Perspective"

Keynote

Professor Mark R Freedland, Third Innis Christie Visiting Professor in Labour and Employment Law, Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University; Distinguished Reader in International and Comparative Labour and Employment Law, Oxford University

With introductions from Associate Dean Michael Deturbide and Professor Bruce Archibald (Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University), and Professor Brian Langille (Faculty of Law, University of Toronto).

Symposium

Saturday 29 September: "Regulating Work Relations: Revisiting Labour and Employment Law in the Current Global Context"  

9 - 10:30 am Session I
Meeting the Pressures of Global Competition: Tradition, Innovation and Flexibiilty

Presentations:
  * Mr. Stephen Lund, CEO, Nova Scotia Business Inc.
  * Professor Travis Fast, School of Industrial Relations, Laval University
Commentators:
  * Mr. Brian Johnston, Stewart McKelvey
  * Mr. Ray Larkin, Pink Larkin

10:30 - 10:45 am Health Break

10:45 am - 12:15 pm Session II
What is the Point of Labour and Employment Law in the Current Global Context?

Presentation:
  * Professor Brian Langille, Faculty of Law, University of Toronto
Commentators:
  * Professor Claire Mummé, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University
  * Professor Emeritus Dianne Pothier, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University

12:15 - 1:30 pm Lunch

1:15 - 2:30 pm Session III
Rethinking Work Regulation in the Private Sector: A New Labour Standards Code?

Presentations:
  * Professor Larry Haiven, School of Business, St. Mary’s University
  * Professor Moira McConnell, Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University
Commentator:
  * Mr. Eric Durnford, Ritch Durnford
  * Ms. Gail Gatchalian, Pink Larkin

2:30 pm – 2:45 pm Health Break

2:45 pm – 4 pm Session IV
Rethinking Work Regulation in Unionized Sectors: Private and Public

North American Trade Union Acts in the New Economy: Are they Working?

Remarks:
  * Mr. Jack Graham, McInnes Cooper
  * Mr. Ron Pink, QC, Pink Larkin

Public Sector Labour Relations: What Works? What Doesn’t?

Remarks:
  * Mr. John MacPherson, McInnes Cooper
  * Ms. Susan Coen, CUPE

4 pm Concluding Observations
Professor Mark Freedland, Oxford University

2nd Annual Innis Christie Symposium: November 11, 2011

"Why the Right-Freedom Distinction Matters to Labour Lawyers"

Keynote

Professor Brian Langille, Second Innis Christie Visiting Professor in Labour and Employment Law, Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University; Faculty of Law, University of Toronto

With introductions from Associate Dean Michael Deturbide and Professor Bruce Archibald (Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University).

1st Annual Innis Christie Symposium: October 22–23, 2010

"Charting the Boundaries of Labour Law: Innis Christie and the Search for an Integrated Law of Labour Market Regulation"

Keynote

Professor Harry Arthurs, First Innis Christie Professor in Labour and Employment Law, Schulich School of Law at Dalhousie University; President Emeritus of York University

With introductions from Dean Kim Brooks (Schulich School of Law, Dalhousie University) and Professor Brian Langille (Faculty of Law, University of Toronto).