Marion Brown

Associate Professor, Associate Director and Accommodations

Brown_profile

Email: marion.brown@dal.ca
Phone: 902-494-1192
Fax: 902-494-6709
Mailing Address: 
School of Social Work
Dalhousie University
Suite 3214, Mona Campbell Building,
1459 LeMarchant Street
PO Box 15000 Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2
 
Research Topics:
  • Critical Girlhood Studies
  • Internationalizing Social Work Practices
  • Health Inequities
  • Social Determinants of Health
  • Social Work Migration
  • Constructivist Grounded Theory

Education

  • BA
  • BSW
  • MSW, Dal
  • PhD, MUN

Biography

Marion Brown holds an MSW from Dalhousie University and a PhD in social work from Memorial University of Newfoundland. She has been a registered social worker in Nova Scotia since 1990 and began teaching at the School of Social Work in 2002. Marion has worked in a variety of settings including community based non-profit programs, clinical counselling practice, and assessment services, in roles from frontline to supervisory. 

Her direct practice has focused on issues related to community responses to youth in care primarily in the non-profit sector: adolescent and family counselling, in-home parenting support, out of home care, and supervised independent living. Working in non-profit has also provided many opportunities for community liaison, public speaking and creative resourcing. Marion’s PhD research centred on teenaged girls who self-identified as using violence and lived in community or institutional settings, where they developed an analysis of expressions of femininities, reasonings of violence, and negotiations within socially controlled spaces.

Research & Grants

Brown, M. & Rose, H., Mitchell, C., Bishop, A., Burge, F., Martin-Misener, R., Sampalli, T., Vanberkel, P., Tortorelli, C. & Goldade, R. (2017-2019). Addressing Fragmentation in the Health Care of Children in Foster Care. Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation, $14,745. 

Brown, M. & Sheppard-Kutcher, J. (2017-2019). Bridge to Social Work in Nova Scotia. Nova Scotia Dept of Labour and Advanced Education Recognition of Prior Learning Competition, $18,089.

Brown, M., Abbott, S., Jones, S., Lachance, L. (2016-2017). Development Work on Choral Singing as a Protective Factor in Youth Resilience. Dalhousie Faculty of Health Professions Faculty Development Fund, $5000.

Asada, Y., Brown, M., McNally, M. Murphy, A., Urquhart, R., Warner, G. (2016-2017). Laying the Foundation for the Fairness Dialogues Project. Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation, $15,000.

Burge, F., Martin-Misener, R., Asada, Y., Brown, M., Marshall, E., Murphy, A., McNally, M., Natarajan, N., Piccinini, H., Sampalli, T., Warner, G., Vallis, M., Whelan, A. (2013-2016). Primary Healthcare: The foundation of the health care system getting stronger. Dalhousie University Strategic Research Initiative Fund, $200,000.

Pullen-Sansfacon, A., Brown, M. & Graham, J. (2012-2016). A qualitative investigation of migrants' experience and their professional adaptation into social work practice in Canada. Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, $163,630.

Brown, M., Hutchinson, P., Lauckner, H, Sargeant, J., MacDonald, M. & Dutton, T. (2011-2016). Navigating Professional Identity Development within Interprofessional Health Care Settings. Nova Scotia Health Research Foundation Health Research Grants Competition, $128,853.
 

Selected Publications | 2009-2018

Brown, M. (2018). Queer-centred counselling strategies. In V. Enns & R. Grieser (Eds.), Counselling insights: Practical strategies for helping others with anxiety, trauma, grief and more. Winnipeg, MB: ACHIEVE Publishing.

Brown, M., Pullen Sansfacon, A. & Matheson, K. (2018). Readiness and Regulation: Perspectives of Canadian stakeholders on the labour mobility of internationally educated social workers. In E. Beddoe & A.  Bartley (Eds.), Transnational social work. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.

Brown, M., Pullen Sansfacon, A., Ethier, S. & Fulton, A. (2018). A complicated welcome: Social workers navigate policy, organizational contexts and socio-cultural dynamics following migration to Canada. In E. Beddoe & A. Bartley (Eds.), Transnational social work. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.

Pullen Sansfacon, A. & Brown, M. (2018). Consistency & change: Internationally educated social workers compare interpretations and approaches in Canada and their countries of origin. In E. Beddoe & A.  Bartley (Eds.), Transnational social work.  Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.

Numer, M., Gahagan, J., Brown, M. & Atkinson, S. (2017). HIV/AIDS and the Public Health Paradox: A poststructural discourse analysis of the impact of HIV messaging on gay men in Nova Scotia. The International Journal of Health, Wellness and Society 7(3).

Fulton, A.E., Pullen Sansfaçon, A., Brown, M., Éthier, S., & Graham, J.R. (2016). Migrant social workers, foreign credential recognition and securing employment in Canada: A qualitative analysis of pre-employment experiences. Canadian Social Work Review, 33(1), pp. 65-86.

Brown, M.,
Pullen-Sansfacon, A., Ethier, S. & Fulton, A. (2015). A complicated welcome: Social workers navigate policy, organizational contexts and socio-cultural dynamics following migration to Canada. International Journal of Social Science Studies, 3(1), pp. 58-68.  

Brown, M., & Strauss, H. (2014). Educating for internationalizing social work practices. International Social Work, 57(3), pp. 197-200.

Pullen-Sansfacon, A., Brown, M., Graham, J. & Michaud, A. (2014). Adaptation and acculturation: Experiences of internationally educated social workers. Journal of International Migration and Integration, 15(2), pp. 317-330.

Brown, M. (2014). Gender, inclusion and citizenship. In L. Dominelli & M. Moosa-Mitha (Eds.), Reconfiguring citizenship: Social exclusion and diversity within inclusive citizenship practice, pp. 157-166. Ashgate Publishers.

Brown, M.  & Gannon, S. (2014). Picture me: Relations of body, image and subject in collective biography, pp. 159-176.  In S. Gannon & M. Gonick (Eds.), Becoming Girl. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press.

Brown, M. (2012). Discourses of choice and experiences of constraint: Analyses of girls’' use of violence. Girlhood Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal, 5(2), pp. 65-85.

Pullen-Sanfacon, A., Brown, M. & Graham, J. (2012). International migration of professional social workers: Toward a theoretical framework for understanding professional adaptation processes. Social Development Issues, 34(2), pp. 37-50.

Gonick, M., Walsh, S & Brown, M. (2011). Collective biography and the question of difference. Qualitative Inquiry, 17 (8), pp. 741-749.

Brown, M. (2011). The sad, the mad and the bad: Co-existing discourses of girlhood. Child and Youth Care Forum, 40(2), pp. 107-120.

Spolander, G., Pullen-Sanfacon, A., Brown, M. & Engelbrecht, L. (2011). Social work education in Canada, England and South Africa: A critical comparison of undergraduate programmes. International Social Work, 54(6), pp. 817-832.

Brown, M. (2010). Negotiations of the living space: Life in the group home for girls who use violence. In M. Chesney-Lind & N. Jones (Eds.), Beating up on girls: Girls, violence, demonization and denial, pp. 175-199. New York: State University of New York Press. 

Brown, M. (2010). Critical Diversity education to promote interprofessional understanding: A comparison of student experiences between face-to-face and online delivery. In A. Bromage, L. Couder, J. Thistlethwaite & F. Gordon (Eds.), Interprofessional E-learning and Collaborative Work: Practices and Technologies, pp. 62-74. Australia: IGI Global Publishing.

Brown, M. (2009). Building professional practice education cultures in the online environment. In J. Martin & L. Hawkins (Eds.), Information communication technologies for human services education and delivery: Concepts and cases, pp. 117-132.  Hershey, PA: Information Science Reference.

Brown, M., Richard, B., & Wichman. (2009). The promise and relevance of structural social work for responsible engagement in lesbian gay, transgender, two-spirit, intersex and queer issues. In S. Hick, H. Peters & T. Corner (Eds.), Practitioners’ perspectives of structural social work, pp. 157-172. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press, Inc.