Statement on Anti-racism and Anti-oppression

School of Communication Sciences and Disorders

The ongoing violent attacks on and deaths of Black, Indigenous, and other People of Colour (BIPOC) at the hands of the police in the United States and Canada have highlighted the need to speak out and act in meaningful ways to bring about systemic change. 

The School of Communication Sciences and Disorders affirms its opposition to all forms of oppression, racism, and discrimination and states clearly and unequivocally that Black Lives Matter and Indigenous Lives Matter. We pledge to scrutinize and change our policies and practices in order to eliminate systemic racism and discrimination in our School and achieve true diversity, inclusivity, equity, and cultural safety. This work is consistent with our strategic plan and core values. As first steps we will immediately engage in the following activities:

  1. Evaluate the admissions requirements—particularly the use of GRE scores—and revise so as to seek to eliminate systemic biases in the admissions process;
  2. Review the Equity Admissions Policy and potentially expand it to include other marginalized groups;
  3. Prioritize equity and diversity when hiring;
  4. Develop a process for compensating BIPOC students, alumni, and external experts who are asked to consult with us on issues of diversity, oppression, racism, and discrimination;
  5. Evaluate and improve how diversity is addressed in the curriculum;
  6. Provide anti-oppression and trauma-informed training to faculty and staff;
  7. Develop and implement a plan to support the success of BIPOC students in the program;
  8. Dialogue with other speech-language-pathology and audiology organizations about dismantling systemic racism and promoting equity in the professions and in our services such as Speech-Language and Audiology Canada (SAC), Canadian Academy of Audiology (CAA), Nova Scotia College of Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists (NSCASLP), Hearing and Speech Nova Scotia (HSNS), and Regional Centres of Education;
  9. Engage in meaningful respectful discussions with BIPOC consultants, students, staff, and faculty to identify further actions that can bring about substantive change. T he action plan will be completed by December 2020;
  10. Inform students, faculty, staff, and other stakeholders monthly on our progress.

 


News from the Faculty of Health Professions

Monday, September 28, 2020
COVID-19 has caused disruption to our lives in many ways, including how we access health care. Many walk-in clinics and family practices were closed, pharmacies have restrictions on patient interactions and as a result of public health protocols, many of us are now meeting with our family doctor through a computer screen or by phone call, instead of face-to-face.
Monday, September 28, 2020
Katrina Philopoulos (BScPT 00) has been the Director Physician Recruitment at Nova Scotia Health for about a year and has had to adapt her work during the global pandemic. She says her background in physiotherapy prepared her for this challenge.
Monday, September 28, 2020
Growing up in a rural community of Creignish, Cape Breton, Catherine MacPherson (MHA’07) knew she wanted a career in health care. She completed her undergrad at McMaster University but returned home to the Maritimes for her masters. “I recall reading a Dal pamphlet when I was in high school outlining the MHA program and being drawn to the curriculum. There was no other school for me to explore than Dal,” she says.
Monday, September 28, 2020
Researchers from Dalhousie University and the Nova Scotia Health Authority are leading projects which received a $1.1 million investment from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and Research Nova Scotia as part of a May 2020 Rapid Research Funding Opportunity.
Monday, September 28, 2020
Brian O’Rourke (BScPH’80) had no real knowledge of or interest in the profession of Pharmacy growing up, and no family member or relative was working in the health care sector. A chance encounter with a guidance counsellor in Grade 9 who mentioned Pharmacy sparked an interest and he decided to pursue this career choice.
View more Faculty of Health Professions News

News from the Faculty of Health Professions

Dawn Morrison with files from Maritime SPOR SUPPORT Unit (MSSU)  –  Research, News
Monday, September 28, 2020
COVID-19 has caused disruption to our lives in many ways, including how we access health care. Many walk-in clinics and family practices were closed, pharmacies have restrictions on patient interactions and as a result of public health protocols, many of us are now meeting with our family doctor through a computer screen or by phone call, instead of face-to-face.
Stephanie Brown  –  News, Alumni & Friends
Monday, September 28, 2020
Katrina Philopoulos (BScPT 00) has been the Director Physician Recruitment at Nova Scotia Health for about a year and has had to adapt her work during the global pandemic. She says her background in physiotherapy prepared her for this challenge.
Kathy MacFarlane  –  Alumni & Friends
Monday, September 28, 2020
Growing up in a rural community of Creignish, Cape Breton, Catherine MacPherson (MHA’07) knew she wanted a career in health care. She completed her undergrad at McMaster University but returned home to the Maritimes for her masters. “I recall reading a Dal pamphlet when I was in high school outlining the MHA program and being drawn to the curriculum. There was no other school for me to explore than Dal,” she says.
Michele Charlton  –  News
Monday, September 28, 2020
Researchers from Dalhousie University and the Nova Scotia Health Authority are leading projects which received a $1.1 million investment from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and Research Nova Scotia as part of a May 2020 Rapid Research Funding Opportunity.
Kathy MacFarlane  –  Alumni & Friends
Monday, September 28, 2020
Brian O’Rourke (BScPH’80) had no real knowledge of or interest in the profession of Pharmacy growing up, and no family member or relative was working in the health care sector. A chance encounter with a guidance counsellor in Grade 9 who mentioned Pharmacy sparked an interest and he decided to pursue this career choice.
View more Faculty of Health Professions News