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Dalhousie University's Imhotep's Legacy Academy awarded NSERC's PromoScience Program

Posted by Media Centre on September 17, 2018 in Science, News

(Halifax, NS) September 17, 2018 - A university-community partnership aimed at encouraging participation in STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) professions by African Nova Scotian youth has been awarded federal funding. The three-year grant by the NSERC PromoScience Program to purchase science supplies and equipment, train staff, and facilitate travel around Nova Scotia to deliver programming.
 
The funding—$128,160 over three years—will enable Imhotep’s Legacy Academy (ILA) to offer hands-on experiential science curriculum to students of African heritage at seven Nova Scotia schools. The academic enrichment program, which is affiliated with Dalhousie University, hires and trains students from University STEM programs to mentor youth participants at seven schools in communities across Nova Scotia.
 
“Long term funding means Imhotep’s Legacy Academy can continue working to overcome the barriers to participation in science and technology programs by students of African heritage from right across Nova Scotia,” said Sidney Idemudia, Imhotep’s Executive Director. “We see a meaningful impact where youth participants in our programming develop a long-term involvement in science and technology that lasts right through to university.”
 
ILA programs have introduced STEM to more than 2,000 students at participating schools across Nova Scotia in the last three years. More than 30 of those students currently attend Dalhousie University, most in science and engineering programs.
 
“Imhotep’s Legacy Academy demonstrates how community-university partnerships can make significant contributions to overcoming social challenges, such as under-representation of African Nova Scotians in STEM programs,” said Dr. Pemberton Cyrus, Associate Vice-President Academic (Acting) and ILA Board chair. “Dalhousie is a proud supporter of STEM outreach programming that brings together faculty, university students and the Nova Scotian community in a shared vision to encourage young people to consider a STEM career path.”
 
Imhotep’s Legacy Academy is funded in part by Dalhousie, TD Canada Trust, and The African Canadian Services Division of the Nova Scotia Department of Education.
 
About Imhotep’s Legacy Academy
Imhotep’s Legacy Academy (ILA) is an innovative university-community partnership that uniquely mobilizes university/college students, faculty and community leaders to help improve student success and bridge the achievement gap for students of African heritage in grades 6-12 across Nova Scotia. ILA’s programs aim to increase the representation of students of African heritage in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) studies and professions.
 
Now in its 16th year, ILA’s After-School Program operates in half of Nova Scotia’s Regional Centres for Education.  ILA trains and supports university/college students to play powerful roles in the lives of its participants through the building of self-confidence, self-discipline and the mastery of concepts related to scientific, technical, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields.  dal.ca/imhotep
 
About the PromoScience Program
NSERC's PromoScience Program offers financial support for organizations working with young Canadians to promote an understanding of science and engineering (including mathematics and technology). Organizations may request funds for up to three years at a time.  nserc-crsng.gc.ca//PromoScience
 
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Media Contacts
Sarah Dawson
Senior Communications Advisor
Dalhousie University
Tel: 902-266-7449
Email: sarah.dawson@dal.ca
 
Sidney Idemudia
Executive Director
Imhotep’s Legacy Academy
Tel: 902-877-1654
Email: imhotep@dal.ca
 


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