Classes Offered

Fall and Winter 2019/2020

Registration for the fall term of 2019 is now open.

Dalhousie Classics Fall and Winter 2019/2020 Schedule

Fall 2019

CLAS 1103: Gods, Heroes and Monsters I (Ancient Mythology)

Staff
MWF 14:35-15:25

An introductory survey of the traditional religious narratives of ancient civilizations including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, Greece, and Rome. Of special interest: the function of myth in shaping and expressing a culture's understanding of the divine, the institutions of human community (religion, the family, government), and the natural world; the interrelationships of the myths of those civilizations; the reception of those traditions in the origins of Christian and Islamic culture. The traditional narratives and their broader cultural contexts will be approached through study of primary sources including epic, tragic, and didactic poetry, hymnography, historiography, philosophy, the visual arts, and architecture.

Held with CLAS 2103 and RELS 1201.

NOTES: This course is the first part of the former full-year course CLAS 1100X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 1103.03 and CLAS 1104.03). Together CLAS 1103.03 and CLAS 1104.03 fulfill the BA writing requirement. CLAS 1103.03 must be successfully completed before taking CLAS 1104.03.

CLAS 1600/RELS 1600: Introduction to Sanskrit I

Dr. C. Austin
MWF 09:35-10:25

RELS 1600   Introductory Sanskrit I 
CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course provides students with all the basic tools required for the study of Sanskrit, with a particular emphasis on basic Sanskrit grammar. Students will learn the Devanagari script, several common nominal forms and the basics of the verbal system, as well as develop a competency in basic reading and recitation.


CROSS-LISTING: CLAS 1600.03

CLAS 1901: Introduction to Hebrew

Dr. C. Grundke
MWF 10:35-11:25

CLAS 1900X/Y    Introductory Classical Hebrew 
CREDIT HOURS: 6
An introduction to Classical Hebrew through the study of its basic grammar. The aim of the course is to read texts in Hebrew.
NOTES: Students taking this course must register in both X and Y in consecutive terms; credit will be given only if both are completed consecutively.
FORMAT: Lecture 
EXCLUSIONS: CLAS 1901.03 or 1902.03

CLAS 2001: Ancient Science: The Beginnings of Wisdom

Dr. K. Fraser
MWF 12:35-13:25

CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course introduces key developments in pre-modern science. Fundamental concepts in the physical sciences, astronomy and cosmology are treated through the study of primary sources from antiquity (Near Eastern and Greco-Roman) and the medieval Islamic, Jewish and Christian cultures. We will be attentive to the wider cultural contexts in which science was pursued and to intersections between science and other ways of knowing (e.g., myth, magic, religion).
FORMAT: Lecture 
CROSS-LISTING: HSTC 2001

CLAS 2214/HIST 2088: Roots of Greek Civilization

Dr. E. Varto

MW 10:05-11:25

CREDIT HOURS: 3
A history of Archaic Greek culture from the Bronze Age palaces of Crete and Mycenae through the development of the Greek city-states. Topics to be discussed include prehistory, palaces and shipwrecks, art and archaeology, the world of Homeric poetry, archaic poetry and thought, colonization, and cultural interaction between the Greek world, the Near East, and Egypt. No knowledge of Greek is expected.
FORMAT:

  • Lecture
  • Discussion

CLAS 2234/HIST 2092: Death, Sex, and Gold in the Ancient Roman World

Dr. J. Mitchell
MWF 08:35-09:25

CREDIT HOURS: 3
We will explore ancient Roman beliefs and practices concerning the afterlife, sexuality, the social duties of men and women, marriage, family life, and slavery. Gladiatorial games, funerals, brothels, temples, and markets are just some of the places at which Romans defined, defended, and denounced each others' identities as mortal, sexual, and economic players. A journey into often alien, always elusive, sometimes alluring aspects of the pre-Christian Mediterranean.
FORMAT:

  • Lecture
  • Tutorial

CLAS 2366/RELS 2366/PHIL 2366: Gods, Beasts, and the Political Animal: Plato, Aristotle, and Their Legacy

Dr. E. Diamond
MWF 08:30-09:30

CREDIT HOURS: 3
We will study some of the most important Platonic dialogues and Aristotelian treatises, to understand the supremely influential views of Plato and Aristotle on divinity, nature, the human, and political community. We will examine the rejection of Platonic-Aristotelian idealism by Stoic, Epicurean and Skeptical schools. Subjects treated include ethics, politics, metaphysics, logic, aesthetics, and psychology.
FORMAT: Lecture 
CROSS-LISTING: RELS 2366, PHIL 2366

CLAS 2401: Introductory Latin I

Dr. M. Fournier
MWF 11:35-12:25

CREDIT HOURS: 3
This is an introduction to Latin grammar and syntax designed to bring students with no previous knowledge of Latin to the point where they are able to read Latin prose authors with the help of only a dictionary.
NOTES: Completion of CLAS 2401.03 and CLAS 2402.03 satisfies the BA language requirement.
FORMAT: Lecture 
EXCLUSIONS: CLAS 1800.06; CLAS 1801.03

CLAS 2505: Introductory Greek I

Dr. E. Diamond
MWF 15:35-16:25

CREDIT HOURS: 3
The course is an introduction to ancient Greek language through the study of its basic grammar. No previous study or experience of Greek is required or expected. The aim of this course is to give students sufficient preparation to read basic passages of ancient Greek texts and to pursue further intermediate studies in ancient Greek. There are no prerequisites for this course; this is an introductory course.
NOTES: This course is the first part of the former full-year course CLAS 2500X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 2505.03 and CLAS 2506.03). CLAS 2505.03 and 2506.03 together fulfill the BA language requirement. 
EXCLUSIONS: CLAS 1700; CLAS 2710, CLAS 2500X/Y.06

CLAS 2701: Intermediate Greek I

Dr. E. Varto
MWF 12:35-13:25

CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is a continuation of the study of ancient Greek language at the intermediate level. It continues the study of the language begun introductory ancient Greek. In the course, students review and complete their study of Greek grammar before reading ancient Greek texts in their original language.
NOTES: This course is the first part of the former full-year course CLAS 2700X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 2701.03 and CLAS 2702.03). 
FORMAT: Seminar 
PREREQUISITES: CLAS 2500 or CLAS 1700X/Y.06 or 2710X/Y.06, CLAS2701.03
EXCLUSIONS: CLAS 2700X/Y.06

CLAS 2801: Intermediate Latin I

Dr. C. Grundke
MWF 13:35-14:25

CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course is a continuation of Introductory Latin at the intermediate level. It is a study of the poetry and prose literature of Rome through a selection of texts. Particular attention is paid to improving the students' command of the grammar and syntax of the Latin language.
NOTES: This course is the first part of the former full-year course CLAS 2800X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 2801.03 and CLAS 2802.03). 
FORMAT: Seminar 
PREREQUISITES: minimum grade of C in CLAS 1800, CLAS 1802, or CLAS 2810, or permission of the instructor
EXCLUSIONS: CLAS 2800X/Y.06

CLAS 3381/RELS 3381/PHIL 2381: Medieval Philosophy from Augustine to Anselm

Dr. M. Fournier
W 13:05-15:55

CREDIT HOURS: 3
A study of texts, primarily within the Latin tradition from Augustine to Anselm, but including selected writings of the Pseudo-Dionysius. Three works will normally be read in their entirety: Boethius, Consolation of Philosophy; Dionysius, Mystical Theology; Anselm, Proslogion. The main interest is the use and transformation of the philosophy of Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and the Neoplatonists in this development. 

CLAS 3662/RELS 3662/5612: Hellenistic Philosophy: From Scepticism to Neoplatonism

Dr. M. Fournier

T 08:30-11:25

CREDIT HOURS: 3
A study of philosophy in the Hellenistic Age. We will investigate the development of Greek and Roman Philosophy, focusing on Pyrrhonian and Academic Scepticism, as well as Middle Platonism. The course covers the logic, physics, and ethics of these philosophical schools, as well as their religious dimension.
PREREQUISITES: CLAS 2361.03 and 2362.03 or permission of instructor
CROSS-LISTING: CLAS 3662.03
EXCLUSIONS: RELS 4602.03, CLAS 4602.03

CLAS 3711/5022: Greek Texts: Epic I

Dr. L. MacLeod
R 11:35-14:25

CREDIT HOURS: 3
A Greek reading course on epic, exploring the works of Homer and/or Hesiod. Texts will be read in Greek.
FORMAT: Seminar 
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
PREREQUISITES: minimum grade of C in CLAS 2700 or permission of the instructor
EXCLUSIONS: CLAS 3710X/Y

CLAS 3851/5037: Latin Texts: Fate and Empire/ Advanced Latin Seminar: Human and Divine

Dr. J. Mitchell
TR 10:05-11:25

CREDIT HOURS: 3
A reading course that solidifies the student's command of grammar and syntax while exploring the theme of fate and empire in the works of authors such as Sallust, Ovid, Virgil, Livy, and Horace. Texts will be read in Latin.
FORMAT: Seminar 
LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 3
PREREQUISITES: minimum grade of C in CLAS 2800 or permission of the instructor
EXCLUSIONS: CLAS 3850X/Y

CLAS 3xxx/4690: Senior Greek Seminar

Dr. L. MacLeod
MW 13:05-14:25

 

CLAS 4452/5xxx: Medieval Interpreters of Aristotle

TBA

W 19:05-21:55

CREDIT HOURS: 3
This course normally focuses on a single philosophical text by a Latin author of the Middle Ages whose work is engaged with Aristotle and the Greek and Latin commentary traditions.
FORMAT: Seminar 
CROSS-LISTING: CLAS 4451
EXCLUSIONS: CLAS 4450X/Y.06; RELS 4450X/Y.06

 

*Introductory classes and the more elementary classes in ancient history and religions and classical philosophy do not require knowledge of the ancient languages. But students who plan to do advanced work in any of these areas are advised to begin study of the appropriate languages as early as possible.

**In order to fulfill all university credit requirements, students expecting to take an honours or combined honours degree in Classics should sign up for CLAS 2710 or CLAS 2810.