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Classes Offered

Fall and Winter 2017/2018

Registration for the fall term of 2017 is now open.

Dalhousie Classics Fall and Winter 2017/2018 Schedule

Fall 2017 

CLAS 1100/2100 (X/Y): Gods, Heroes and Monsters (Ancient Mythology)

Staff
MWF 14:35-15:25

An exploration of the stories that shaped the ancient world’s view of the divine, of human community, and of the natural world.  How did myths develop?  How did they survive in the Christian and Islamic worlds?  From literature to religion to philosophy and art, we explore the enduring appeal of the mythic imagination.This course fulfills the 1st Year Writing Requirement.

Introductory classes and the more elementary classes in ancient history and religions and classical philosophy do not require knowledge of the ancient languages. But students who plan to do advanced work in any of these areas are advised to begin study of the appropriate languages as early as possible.

CLAS 1801: Introduction to Latin Part I

Staff
MWF 1:35-2:25
Undertake the exploration of one of history’s most satisfying linguistic challenges: the iron language of the Emperors.

CLAS 2234: Death, Sex, and Gold in Ancient Rome

Dr. J. Mitchell
TR 13:05-14:25 

We will explore ancient Roman beliefs and practices concerning the afterlife, sexuality, the social duties of men and women, marriage, family life, and slavery. Gladiatorial games, funerals, brothels, temples, and markets are just some of the places at which Romans defined, defended, and denounced each others' identities as mortal, sexual, and economic players. A journey into often alien, always elusive, sometimes alluring aspects of the pre-Christian Mediterranean.

CLAS 2361: Ancient Philosophy: Thales to Plato

Dr. M. Fournier
MWF 11:35-12:25
 

This course covers the period in Ancient Philosophy from Thales to Plato: Pre-Socratics, Sophists, Minor Socratics, and selected Platonic dialogues.

CLAS 2500 (X/Y): Introductory Ancient Greek

Dr. L. MacLeod
MWF 10:35-11:25

The course is an introduction to ancient Greek language through the study of its basic grammar. No previous study or experience of Greek is required or expected. The aim of this course is to give students sufficient preparation to read basic passages of ancient Greek texts and to pursue further intermediate studies in ancient Greek. There are no prerequisites for this course; this is an introductory course.

CLAS 2700 (X/Y): Intermediate Greek

Dr. E. Diamond
MWF 12:35-13:25

This course is a continuation of the study of ancient Greek language at the intermediate level. It continues the study of the language begun introductory ancient Greek. In the course, students review and complete their study of Greek grammar before reading ancient Greek texts in their original language.

CLAS 2800 (X/Y): Intermediate Latin

MWF: 9:35-10:25 

This course is a continuation of Introductory Latin at the intermediate level. It is a study of the poetry and prose literature of Rome through a selection of texts. Particular attention is paid to improving the students' command of the grammar and syntax of the Latin language.

CLAS 3525: Ancient Greek Epic

Dr. L. MacLeod
TR 13:05-14:25
 

This course is designed to introduce students to the heroic epics of the Ancient Greek world. Texts are read in translation and will be selected from the works of Hesiod, Homer, and Apollonius of Rhodes. Topics to be discussed will include the cultural background of the Homeric world; the nature of oral poetry; oral vs. literate culture; conventions of the epic genre; the heroic code; the relationship between the human and divine world.

CLAS 3662: From Scepticism to Neoplatonism

Dr. M. Fournier
T 14:35-17:25
 

A study of philosophy in the Hellenistic Age. We will investigate the development of Greek and Roman Philosophy, focusing on Pyrrhonian and Academic Scepticism, as well as Middle Platonism. The course covers the logic, physics, and ethics of these philosophical schools, as well as their religious dimension.

CLAS 3741: Greek Texts: Tragedy I

Dr. L. MacLeod
W 11:35-14:25
 

A Greek reading course on tragedy, exploring the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and/or Euripides. Texts will be read in ancient Greek.

CLAS 3821: Latin Texts: Human and Divine

Dr. J. Mitchell
MWF 10:35-11:25
 

A reading course that solidifies the student's command of grammar and syntax while exploring the themes of the human and the divine in the works of authors such as Apuleius, Virgil, Ovid, and Horace. Texts will be read in Latin.

CLAS 4018: Christian Theology in Islamic Lands

Dr. A. Treiger
F 11:35-14:25
 

John of Damascus (d. 749) is one of the greatest Christian theologians of the Patristic age. Though he wrote in Greek, he was a Christian Arab (his Arabic name is Mansur ibn Sarjun), who lived under Muslim rule and was employed as a public official in the Umayyad administration in Damascus. The course will focus on his theological works (especially his summa of Christian theology, entitled On the Orthodox Faith, and his three treatises in defence of the icons), their Christian sources, and their Islamic context.

CLAS 4050: Sappho

Dr. J. Mitchell
W 11:35-14:25 

Sappho is simultaneously one of the most famous ancient authors and one of the most problematic. Once acclaimed as the most sublime lyric poet of antiquity, even as the "tenth Muse," she reaches us in only a handful of intact poems (together with numerous fragments); therefore, in this class we will employ the full range of scholarly tools (aesthetic interpretation, historical-literary context, theories of performance, analysis of metre and dialect, papyrology) in attempting to assess both Sappho's mostly lost corpus and her legacy in the modern world.

Winter 2018 

CLAS 1802: Introduction to Latin Part II

Staff
MWF 1.35-2.25
Undertake the exploration of one of history’s most satisfying linguistic challenges: the iron language of the Emperors.

**Prerequisite: CLAS 1801

CLAS 2215: The Classical Greek World

T/TH 10:05-11:25

A history of Classical Greek culture from the rise of Athens and Sparta as the dominant Greek city-states to the fall of Athens in the Peloponnesian Wars and the death of Socrates. Topics to be discussed include the rise of democracy, the culture and society of the Athenian ‘Golden Ages’, drama, art and architecture, empire building, and the Greeks at war, first with the Persian Empire and then with each other. No knowledge of Greek is expected.

CLAS 2320: Panpsychism

Dr. M. Fournier
MWF 14:35-15:25

One of the most controversial new theories in consciousness studies is actually one of the oldest and most common ideas in the history of philosophy. Panpsychism, the view that mind is a fundamental feature of the physical world, goes back to Thales among the Greeks, and has numerous defenders in Hellenic, Hellenistic, late Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, and Modern philosophy. This class will begin from a consideration of contemporary arguments for panpsychism in Nagel, Chalmers, and Strawson before turning to explore panpsychist views from Thales to Leibniz.

CLAS 2366: Gods, Beasts, and the Political Animal

Dr. E. Diamond
MWF 13:35-14:25

We will study some of the most important Platonic dialogues and Aristotelian treatises, to understand the supremely influential views of Plato and Aristotle on divinity, nature, the human, and political community. We will examine the rejection of Platonic-Aristotelian idealism by Stoic, Epicurean and Skeptical schools. Subjects treated include ethics, politics, metaphysics, logic, aesthetics, and psychology.

CLAS 3413: Augustine's Confessions

W 19:05-21:55

A study of the 13 books of Augustine's Confessions.

CLAS 3505: Aristotle

Dr. E. Diamond
T 14:35-17:25
 

A careful reading of an Aristotelian treatise, or selections from several treatises. The treatise studied will vary from year to year .

CLAS 3516: Ancient Comedy

Dr. L. MacLeod
MW 11:35-12:55
 

Ancient Comedy ranges from the boisterous and bawdy plays of Old Comedy through the domestic and romantic ‘tragicomedies’ of Euripides to the boy-meets-girl stories of Greek and Roman New Comedy. This course examines the origins and development of the comic genre in the Greek and Roman world through a study of the plays of Aristophanes, Euripides, Menander, Plautus, and Terence in translation. It considers the nature of comedy and its function within society as well as the basic techniques and conventions of the genre itself. Topics to be studied include the ‘comic hero’; comic stereotypes; types of humor; the relationship between actor & spectator.

CLAS 3611: Jedis of Greco-Roman World

Dr. J. Mitchell
MW 9:35-10:55
 

The ancient art of oratory was an art of mind-control. In politics, in law, in love, success depended on the skillful use of rhetoric to persuade neutrals, rally friends, and demolish enemies. In this class, we will explore the historical development of Greek and Roman oratory, study the actual techniques ancient speakers employed both in phrasing and in argument, consider the causes of the decline of oratory in antiquity itself, and compare ancient oratory to oratory in our modern world. (No knowledge of ancient Greek or Latin is required.)

CLAS 3782: Greek Texts: History II

Dr. E. Varto
WF 10:05-11:25

A Greek reading course on historical texts, exploring the works of authors such as Herodotus, Thucydides, Lysias, and Plutarch. Texts will be read in ancient Greek.

CLAS 3822: Latin Texts: Myth and History

Dr. J. Mitchell
TR 13:05-14:25

A reading course that solidifies the student's command of grammar and syntax while exploring the themes of myth and history in the works of authors such as Apuleius, Livy, Virgil, and Horace. Texts will be read in Latin.

CLAS 4680: Reading & Research: Ovid

Dr. P. O'Brien
W 8:35-11:25
 

*Introductory classes and the more elementary classes in ancient history and religions and classical philosophy do not require knowledge of the ancient languages. But students who plan to do advanced work in any of these areas are advised to begin study of the appropriate languages as early as possible.

**In order to fulfill all university credit requirements, students expecting to take an honours or combined honours degree in Classics should sign up for CLAS 2710 or CLAS 2810.