Classes Offered

Fall and Winter 2018/2019

Registration for the fall term of 2018 is now open.

Dalhousie Classics Fall and Winter 2018/2019 Schedule

Fall 2018

CLAS 1103: Gods, Heroes and Monsters I (Ancient Mythology)

Staff
MWF 14:35-15:25

An introductory survey of the traditional religious narratives of ancient civilizations including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, Greece, and Rome. Of special interest: the function of myth in shaping and expressing a culture's understanding of the divine, the institutions of human community (religion, the family, government), and the natural world; the interrelationships of the myths of those civilizations; the reception of those traditions in the origins of Christian and Islamic culture. The traditional narratives and their broader cultural contexts will be approached through study of primary sources including epic, tragic, and didactic poetry, hymnography, historiography, philosophy, the visual arts, and architecture.

NOTES: This course is the first part of the former full-year course CLAS 1100X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 1103.03 and CLAS 1104.03). Together CLAS 1103.03 and CLAS 1104.03 fulfill the BA writing requirement. CLAS 1103.03 must be successfully completed before taking CLAS 1104.03.

CLAS 2026: Paganism

Dr. J. Mitchell
MWF 13:35-14:25

The term "Pagan" originated as a derogatory Christian designation for ignorant conservative rustics who kept to the pre-Christian religions. We shall look at those religions in their origins, nature, and development in antiquity, their continuations in the Middle Ages and modernity, and their persistence and revival in the contemporary world.

Crosslist: RELS 2026

CLAS 2103: Gods, Heroes and Monsters I (Ancient Mythology)

Staff
MWF 14:35-15:25

An introductory survey of the traditional religious narratives of ancient civilizations including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, Greece, and Rome. Of special interest: the function of myth in shaping and expressing a culture's understanding of the divine, the institutions of human community (religion, the family, government), and the natural world; the interrelationships of the myths of those civilizations; the reception of those traditions in the origins of Christian and Islamic culture. The traditional narratives and their broader cultural contexts will be approached through study of primary sources including epic, tragic, and didactic poetry, hymnography, historiography, philosophy, the visual arts, and architecture.

Held with CLAS 1104 and RELS 1201

CLAS 2216: Alexander the Great

Dr. E. Varto
TR 10:05-11:25

A history of Late Classical and Hellenistic Greek culture from the end of the Peloponnesian Wars through the empire of Alexander the Great to the Hellenistic World. Topics to be discussed include relations between and among the Greek city-states and the Persian Empire, developments in art, religion, literature, and philosophy, the career and legacy of Alexander, and the new world order of kings and kingdoms he ushered in. No knowledge of Greek is expected.

Crosslist: HIST 2089

CLAS 2231: The Rise of Rome

Staff
MWF 12:35-13:25

How did a little village conquer the world? This course follows Rome's gradual expansion across Latium, Italy, and finally the whole Mediterranean. Questionable myths, aggressive literature, fiery rhetoric, and political propaganda complement the archaeological record as we trace the development and decadence of Republican institutions and the Republic's descent into shattering civil war. Class tensions, continuous foreign conflict, and still famous figures like Brutus, Cato, Cicero, and Caesar feature prominently in this vigorous study of a paradigmatic political and social problem: the destiny of Republican Rome. Students will be expected to familiarise themselves with both primary and secondary materials, but no knowledge of Latin is required. 

Crosslist: HIST 2090

CLAS 2365: Philosophy on Trial

Dr. E. Diamond
MWF 13:35-14:25

Socrates (469-399 BCE) never wrote a single word, but posed such threat to Athens that a jury put him to death for the alleged ethical corruption and impiety of his thought. This course will explore the revolutionary life and thought of Socrates, and consider whether the jury's decision against him was justified.

Crosslist: PHIL 2365, RELS 2365

CLAS 2401: Introductory Latin Part I

Dr. M. Fournier
MWF 13:35-14:25

This is an introduction to Latin grammar and syntax designed to bring students with no previous knowledge of Latin to the point where they are able to read Latin prose authors with the help of only a dictionary.
NOTES: Completion of CLAS 2401.03 and CLAS 2402.03 satisfies the BA language requirement.

CLAS 2505: Introductory Ancient Greek I

Dr. E. Diamond
MWF 12:35-13:25

The course is an introduction to ancient Greek language through the study of its basic grammar. No previous study or experience of Greek is required or expected. The aim of this course is to give students sufficient preparation to read basic passages of ancient Greek texts and to pursue further intermediate studies in ancient Greek. There are no prerequisites for this course; this is an introductory course.
NOTES: This course is the first part of the former full-year course CLAS 2500X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 2505.03 and CLAS 2506.03). CLAS 2505.03 and 2506.03 together fulfill the BA language requirement. 

CLAS 2801: Intermediate Latin I

Staff
MWF 8:35-9:25

This course is a continuation of Introductory Latin at the intermediate level. It is a study of the poetry and prose literature of Rome through a selection of texts. Particular attention is paid to improving the students' command of the grammar and syntax of the Latin language.
NOTES: This course is the first part of the former full-year course CLAS 2800X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 2801.03 and CLAS 2802.03). 

CLAS 3381: Medieval Philosophy from Augustine to Anselm

Dr. M. Fournier
R 14:35-17:25

A study of texts, primarily within the Latin tradition from Augustine to Anselm, but including selected writings of the Pseudo-Dionysius. Three works will normally be read in their entirety: Boethius, Consolation of Philosophy; Dionysius, Mystical Theology; Anselm, Proslogion. The main interest is the use and transformation of the philosophy of Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and the Neoplatonists in this development. 

Crosslist: RELS 3381, PHIL 2381

CLAS 3403: The Dialogues of Plato I

Dr. E. Diamond
M 14:35-17:25

This seminar involves the detailed study of a group of dialogues. The choice of dialogues varies from year to year.
Topic: Plato's Republic

NOTES: This course is the first part of the former full-year course CLAS 3400X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 3403.03 and CLAS 3404.03). 

CLAS 3661: The Epicureans

Dr. M. Fournier
T 14:35-17:25

Crosslist: RELS 3661

CLAS 3781: Greek Texts: History I

Dr. E. Varto
W 11:35-14:25

A Greek reading course on historical texts, exploring the works of authors such as Herodotus, Thucydides, Lysias, and Plutarch. Texts will be read in ancient Greek.

CLAS 3811: Latin Texts: Love and Violence

Dr. J. Mitchell
W 8:35-11:35

A reading course that solidifies the student's command of grammar and syntax while exploring the themes of love and violence in the works of authors such as Cicero, Virgil, Catullus, and Horace. Texts will be read in Latin.

CLAS 4010: Islamic Philosophy: al-Ghazali

Dr. A. Treiger
M 11:35-14:25

Abu Hamid al-Ghazali (1058-1111) is one of the greatest Muslim thinkers of all time. This course is an introduction to his thought, focusing on al-Ghazali’s “two-tier” approach to theology – exoteric theology for the masses and esoteric theology for the select few – and on his attitude to Islamic philosophy and Islamic mysticism (Sufism).

Crosslist: RELS 4010

CLAS 4401: Philosophy of the Greek Church Fathers

Dr. A. Treiger
W 11:35-14:25

This seminar involves the detailed study of a text, or group of texts, from one or more of the Greek Church Fathers. The choice of text varies from year to year, in relation to the needs and interests of students.

Crosslist: RELS 4401

CLAS 4451: Medieval Interpreters of Aristotle

Staff
W 19:05-21:55

This course normally focuses on a single philosophical text by a Latin author of the Middle Ages whose work is engaged with Aristotle and the Greek and Latin commentary traditions.

Topic: Meister Eckhart

CLAS 4545: Roman Culture and Politics

Dr. J. Mitchell
M 9:35-12:25

 

Winter 2019

CLAS 1104: Gods, Heroes and Monsters II (Ancient Mythology)

Staff
MWF 14:35-15:25

An introductory survey of the traditional religious narratives of ancient civilizations including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, Greece, and Rome. Of special interest: the function of myth in shaping and expressing a culture's understanding of the divine, the institutions of human community (religion, the family, government), and the natural world; the interrelationships of the myths of those civilizations; the reception of those traditions in the origins of Christian and Islamic culture. The traditional narratives and their broader cultural contexts will be approached through study of primary sources including epic, tragic, and didactic poetry, hymnography, historiography, philosophy, the visual arts, and architecture.

NOTES: This course is the first part of the former full-year course CLAS 1100X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 1103.03 and CLAS 1104.03). Together CLAS 1103.03 and CLAS 1104.03 fulfill the BA writing requirement. CLAS 1103.03 must be successfully completed before taking CLAS 1104.03.

CLAS 2024: Philosophy and God

Staff
TR 16:05-17:25

Does god exist? Can God be known? Have a nature? Do evil? Beginning by occupying the same ground as religion, philosophy has asked these questions. Starting with Pythagoras, Empedocles, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, and continuing with their pagan Jewish, Christian, and Islamic followers, we shall learn to state the answers of sages and mystics with historical accuracy and to judge their persuasive power.

Crosslist: RELS 2026

CLAS 2104: Gods, Heroes and Monsters II (Ancient Mythology)

Staff
MWF 14:35-15:25

An introductory survey of the traditional religious narratives of ancient civilizations including Mesopotamia, Egypt, Israel, Greece, and Rome. Of special interest: the function of myth in shaping and expressing a culture's understanding of the divine, the institutions of human community (religion, the family, government), and the natural world; the interrelationships of the myths of those civilizations; the reception of those traditions in the origins of Christian and Islamic culture. The traditional narratives and their broader cultural contexts will be approached through study of primary sources including epic, tragic, and didactic poetry, hymnography, historiography, philosophy, the visual arts, and architecture.

Held with CLAS 1104 and RELS 1201

CLAS 2202: The Beginnings of Western Medicine: The Birth of the Body

Dr. I. Stewart
T 17:35-20:25

This course will look at how the body was viewed in ancient scientific theory and practice. Western medicine as a rationalized scientific practice finds it origins in the ancient Greek philosophical and medical texts attributed to “Hippocrates”. Through a close reading of selected ancient medical texts, this course will explore ideas of how the human body is constituted, how it relates to the Cosmos as a whole, what the role of the physician was seen to be, and how illness and healing were seen as changes in the balance of the components of the body.

Crosslist: HSTC 2202

CLAS 2233: Roman Legions and the Barbarians

Dr. J. Mitchell
MWF 12:35-13:25

This course examines the origins, refinement, and eventual collapse of the Roman military machine. Grand strategy, field tactics, and the analysis of specific battles complement our study of the changing relationship between the army and Roman society and the former's role in building and breaking the political order from 500 BC to 500 AD.

Crosslist: HIST 2023

CLAS 2402: Introductory Latin Part II

Dr. M. Fournier
TR 13:05-14:25

This class is a continuation of CLAS 2401.03: Introductory Latin I. This is an introduction to Latin grammar and syntax designed to bring students with no previous knowledge of Latin to the point where they are able to read Latin prose authors with the help of only a dictionary.
NOTES: Completion of CLAS 2401.03 and CLAS 2402.03 satisfies the BA language requirement.

CLAS 2506: Introductory Ancient Greek II

Dr. E. Diamond
MWF 12:35-13:25

The aim of this course is to give students sufficient preparation to read basic passages of ancient Greek texts and to pursue further intermediate studies in ancient Greek. 
NOTES: This course is the second part of the former full-year course CLAS 2500X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 2505.03 and CLAS 2506.03). CLAS 2505.03 and 2506.03 together fulfill the BA language requirement. 

CLAS 2802: Intermediate Latin II

Staff
MWF 8:35-9:25

This course is a continuation of Introductory Latin at the intermediate level. It is a study of the poetry and prose literature of Rome through a selection of texts. Particular attention is paid to improving the students' command of the grammar and syntax of the Latin language.
NOTES: This course is the first part of the former full-year course CLAS 2800X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 2801.03 and CLAS 2802.03). 

CLAS 3021: Ancient Art and Architecture

Dr. E. Varto
MW 10:05-11:25

This course offers an introduction to the art and architecture of the ancient Near Eastern and Classical worlds, with an emphasis on understanding cultures through their artistic and material remains. Various types and forms of artistic expression will be considered as they develop and change over time and space in their social, political, intellectual, and religious contexts.

CLAS 3320: Oracles, Omens and Astrology

Dr. K. Fraser
TR 14:35-15:55

In all of the cultures of antiquity there were specialists who claimed knowledge of future events based on the reading of ominous "signs" in various media, earthly and heavenly. This course examines the history of divination and astrology in Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greece and Rome from a multidisciplinary perspective. 

CLAS 3371: The Augustinian Tradition

Staff
W 19:05-21:55

Topic: Proslogion

CLAS 3382: Medieval Philosophy from Arabic and Jewish Thinkers to Aquinas

Dr. M. Fournier
R 14:35-17:25

A study of texts which reflect the transformation of the ancient philosophical tradition within the works of medieval Arabic and Jewish thinkers and of the Latin Christians to whom they mediated ancient philosophy. Selections from al-Farabi, Moses Maimonides, Averroes, and Aquinas, among others will be read. Bonaventure's The Mind's Journey into God will be read in its entirety.

Prerequisites: CLAS 3381, PHIL 2381 or permission of the instructor
Crosslist: RELS 3382, PHIL 2382

CLAS 3404: The Dialogues of Plato II

Dr. E. Diamond
T 14:35-17:25

This seminar involves the detailed study of a group of dialogues. The choice of dialogues varies from year to year.
Topic: Plato's Timaeus and Laws

NOTES: This course is the first part of the former full-year course CLAS 3400X/Y.06. This course description reflects the entirety of the pair (CLAS 3403.03 and CLAS 3404.03). 

CLAS 3515: Greek Tragedy

Dr. L. MacLeod
TR 13:05-14:25

Greek tragedy was a product of the democratic society of fifth century Athens and played a vital role in the life of the community. This course explores the nature and development of the tragic genre through a study of the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides in translation. The tragedies are examined as literary texts and in terms of their mythical background and cultural context. Topics to be studied include the conventions of the genre; the nature of tragic heroism; aspects of staging and performance; ancient & modern theories of tragedy.

CLAS 3742: Greek Texts: Tragedy II

Dr. L. MacLeod
W 11:35-14:25

A Greek reading course on tragedy, exploring the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and/or Euripides. Texts will be read in ancient Greek.

CLAS 3812: Latin Texts: War and Peace

Dr. J. Mitchell
W 8:35-11:35

A reading course that solidifies the student's command of grammar and syntax while exploring the themes of war and peace in the works of authors such as Cicero, Virgil, Catullus, and Horace. Texts will be read in Latin.

CLAS 4018: Christian Theology in Islamic Lands

Dr. A. Treiger
M 11:35-14:25

John of Damascus (d. 749) is one of the greatest Christian theologians of the Patristic age. Though he wrote in Greek, he was a Christian Arab (his Arabic name is Mansur ibn Sarjun), who lived under Muslim rule and was employed as a public official in the Umayyad administration in Damascus. The course will focus on his theological works (especially his summa of Christian theology, entitled On the Orthodox Faith, and his three treatises in defence of the icons), their Christian sources, and their Islamic context.

Crosslist: RELS 4018

CLAS 4117: Beginning with Being: Reading Parmenides from Plato-Heidegger

Dr. E. Diamond
Dr. D. Brandes
MW 14:35-15:55

In this course, we shall stage an encounter between the two great thinkers - Plato and Heidegger - whose thought has often been thought to mark the ‘beginning’ and the ‘end’ of the Western philosophical tradition. Taking Parmenides’ pregnant insight (“Being and Thinking are the same”) as the poietic site of this encounter, we will ask what it still means to engage in philosophy today.

Crosslist: CTMP 4117

CLAS 4810: Special Topics

Dr. P. O'Brien
M 9:05-11:55

Topic: Catullus

Fall 2017

CLAS 1100/2100 (X/Y): Gods, Heroes and Monsters (Ancient Mythology)

Staff
MWF 14:35-15:25

An exploration of the stories that shaped the ancient world’s view of the divine, of human community, and of the natural world.  How did myths develop?  How did they survive in the Christian and Islamic worlds?  From literature to religion to philosophy and art, we explore the enduring appeal of the mythic imagination.This course fulfills the 1st Year Writing Requirement.

Introductory classes and the more elementary classes in ancient history and religions and classical philosophy do not require knowledge of the ancient languages. But students who plan to do advanced work in any of these areas are advised to begin study of the appropriate languages as early as possible.

CLAS 1801: Introduction to Latin Part I

Staff
MWF 1:35-2:25
Undertake the exploration of one of history’s most satisfying linguistic challenges: the iron language of the Emperors.

CLAS 2234: Death, Sex, and Gold in Ancient Rome

Dr. J. Mitchell
TR 13:05-14:25 

We will explore ancient Roman beliefs and practices concerning the afterlife, sexuality, the social duties of men and women, marriage, family life, and slavery. Gladiatorial games, funerals, brothels, temples, and markets are just some of the places at which Romans defined, defended, and denounced each others' identities as mortal, sexual, and economic players. A journey into often alien, always elusive, sometimes alluring aspects of the pre-Christian Mediterranean.

CLAS 2361: Ancient Philosophy: Thales to Plato

Dr. M. Fournier
MWF 11:35-12:25
 

This course covers the period in Ancient Philosophy from Thales to Plato: Pre-Socratics, Sophists, Minor Socratics, and selected Platonic dialogues.

CLAS 2500 (X/Y): Introductory Ancient Greek

Dr. L. MacLeod
MWF 10:35-11:25

The course is an introduction to ancient Greek language through the study of its basic grammar. No previous study or experience of Greek is required or expected. The aim of this course is to give students sufficient preparation to read basic passages of ancient Greek texts and to pursue further intermediate studies in ancient Greek. There are no prerequisites for this course; this is an introductory course.

CLAS 2700 (X/Y): Intermediate Greek

Dr. E. Diamond
MWF 12:35-13:25

This course is a continuation of the study of ancient Greek language at the intermediate level. It continues the study of the language begun introductory ancient Greek. In the course, students review and complete their study of Greek grammar before reading ancient Greek texts in their original language.

CLAS 2800 (X/Y): Intermediate Latin

MWF: 9:35-10:25 

This course is a continuation of Introductory Latin at the intermediate level. It is a study of the poetry and prose literature of Rome through a selection of texts. Particular attention is paid to improving the students' command of the grammar and syntax of the Latin language.

CLAS 3525: Ancient Greek Epic

Dr. L. MacLeod
TR 13:05-14:25
 

This course is designed to introduce students to the heroic epics of the Ancient Greek world. Texts are read in translation and will be selected from the works of Hesiod, Homer, and Apollonius of Rhodes. Topics to be discussed will include the cultural background of the Homeric world; the nature of oral poetry; oral vs. literate culture; conventions of the epic genre; the heroic code; the relationship between the human and divine world.

CLAS 3662: From Scepticism to Neoplatonism

Dr. M. Fournier
T 14:35-17:25
 

A study of philosophy in the Hellenistic Age. We will investigate the development of Greek and Roman Philosophy, focusing on Pyrrhonian and Academic Scepticism, as well as Middle Platonism. The course covers the logic, physics, and ethics of these philosophical schools, as well as their religious dimension.

CLAS 3741: Greek Texts: Tragedy I

Dr. L. MacLeod
W 11:35-14:25
 

A Greek reading course on tragedy, exploring the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and/or Euripides. Texts will be read in ancient Greek.

CLAS 3821: Latin Texts: Human and Divine

Dr. J. Mitchell
MWF 10:35-11:25
 

A reading course that solidifies the student's command of grammar and syntax while exploring the themes of the human and the divine in the works of authors such as Apuleius, Virgil, Ovid, and Horace. Texts will be read in Latin.

CLAS 4018: Christian Theology in Islamic Lands

Dr. A. Treiger
F 11:35-14:25
 

John of Damascus (d. 749) is one of the greatest Christian theologians of the Patristic age. Though he wrote in Greek, he was a Christian Arab (his Arabic name is Mansur ibn Sarjun), who lived under Muslim rule and was employed as a public official in the Umayyad administration in Damascus. The course will focus on his theological works (especially his summa of Christian theology, entitled On the Orthodox Faith, and his three treatises in defence of the icons), their Christian sources, and their Islamic context.

CLAS 4050: Sappho

Dr. J. Mitchell
W 11:35-14:25 

Sappho is simultaneously one of the most famous ancient authors and one of the most problematic. Once acclaimed as the most sublime lyric poet of antiquity, even as the "tenth Muse," she reaches us in only a handful of intact poems (together with numerous fragments); therefore, in this class we will employ the full range of scholarly tools (aesthetic interpretation, historical-literary context, theories of performance, analysis of metre and dialect, papyrology) in attempting to assess both Sappho's mostly lost corpus and her legacy in the modern world.

Winter 2018 

CLAS 1802: Introduction to Latin Part II

Staff
MWF 1.35-2.25
Undertake the exploration of one of history’s most satisfying linguistic challenges: the iron language of the Emperors.

**Prerequisite: CLAS 1801

CLAS 2215: The Classical Greek World

T/TH 10:05-11:25

A history of Classical Greek culture from the rise of Athens and Sparta as the dominant Greek city-states to the fall of Athens in the Peloponnesian Wars and the death of Socrates. Topics to be discussed include the rise of democracy, the culture and society of the Athenian ‘Golden Ages’, drama, art and architecture, empire building, and the Greeks at war, first with the Persian Empire and then with each other. No knowledge of Greek is expected.

CLAS 2320: Panpsychism

Dr. M. Fournier
MWF 14:35-15:25

One of the most controversial new theories in consciousness studies is actually one of the oldest and most common ideas in the history of philosophy. Panpsychism, the view that mind is a fundamental feature of the physical world, goes back to Thales among the Greeks, and has numerous defenders in Hellenic, Hellenistic, late Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, and Modern philosophy. This class will begin from a consideration of contemporary arguments for panpsychism in Nagel, Chalmers, and Strawson before turning to explore panpsychist views from Thales to Leibniz.

CLAS 2366: Gods, Beasts, and the Political Animal

Dr. E. Diamond
MWF 13:35-14:25

We will study some of the most important Platonic dialogues and Aristotelian treatises, to understand the supremely influential views of Plato and Aristotle on divinity, nature, the human, and political community. We will examine the rejection of Platonic-Aristotelian idealism by Stoic, Epicurean and Skeptical schools. Subjects treated include ethics, politics, metaphysics, logic, aesthetics, and psychology.

CLAS 3413: Augustine's Confessions

W 19:05-21:55

A study of the 13 books of Augustine's Confessions.

CLAS 3505: Aristotle

Dr. E. Diamond
T 14:35-17:25
 

A careful reading of an Aristotelian treatise, or selections from several treatises. The treatise studied will vary from year to year .

CLAS 3516: Ancient Comedy

Dr. L. MacLeod
MW 11:35-12:55
 

Ancient Comedy ranges from the boisterous and bawdy plays of Old Comedy through the domestic and romantic ‘tragicomedies’ of Euripides to the boy-meets-girl stories of Greek and Roman New Comedy. This course examines the origins and development of the comic genre in the Greek and Roman world through a study of the plays of Aristophanes, Euripides, Menander, Plautus, and Terence in translation. It considers the nature of comedy and its function within society as well as the basic techniques and conventions of the genre itself. Topics to be studied include the ‘comic hero’; comic stereotypes; types of humor; the relationship between actor & spectator.

CLAS 3611: Jedis of Greco-Roman World

Dr. J. Mitchell
MW 9:35-10:55
 

The ancient art of oratory was an art of mind-control. In politics, in law, in love, success depended on the skillful use of rhetoric to persuade neutrals, rally friends, and demolish enemies. In this class, we will explore the historical development of Greek and Roman oratory, study the actual techniques ancient speakers employed both in phrasing and in argument, consider the causes of the decline of oratory in antiquity itself, and compare ancient oratory to oratory in our modern world. (No knowledge of ancient Greek or Latin is required.)

CLAS 3782: Greek Texts: History II

Dr. E. Varto
WF 10:05-11:25

A Greek reading course on historical texts, exploring the works of authors such as Herodotus, Thucydides, Lysias, and Plutarch. Texts will be read in ancient Greek.

CLAS 3822: Latin Texts: Myth and History

Dr. J. Mitchell
TR 13:05-14:25

A reading course that solidifies the student's command of grammar and syntax while exploring the themes of myth and history in the works of authors such as Apuleius, Livy, Virgil, and Horace. Texts will be read in Latin.

CLAS 4680: Reading & Research: Ovid

Dr. P. O'Brien
W 8:35-11:25
 

*Introductory classes and the more elementary classes in ancient history and religions and classical philosophy do not require knowledge of the ancient languages. But students who plan to do advanced work in any of these areas are advised to begin study of the appropriate languages as early as possible.

**In order to fulfill all university credit requirements, students expecting to take an honours or combined honours degree in Classics should sign up for CLAS 2710 or CLAS 2810.