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International Courses

Take your learning on the road

If you're interested in traveling and learning at the same time, we have several courses just for you. Several of our professors take their students on a three week road trip to a variety of locations around the world.

Some of the places we have already been include Cuba, Czech Republic, Central Europe and Britain.

Classes with international travel


ANSC 3007: African Wildlife Ecology - Port Elizabeth, South Africa

Run collaboratively by Rhodes University’s Wildlife and Reserve Management Research Group, South Africa. Every alternate year, a group of 13-15 students will visit Rhodes and the Eastern Cape for an intensive 2-4 week course on African Wildlife Ecology based at the Amakhala GameReserve.

For more information contact: Student Mobility Officer at intdalac@dal.ca

HORT2003.03:  British Garden - United Kingdom, England (Inactive 2015-2016 Academic Year)
This course is intended to guide you through what, for many, is an overwhelming experience – the exploration and study of centuries of European garden history and tradition.  During the course we will visit English gardens, both historic and modern.  No garden style is developed in isolation. From time to time our travel plans may include important gardens outside of England.

Through student led analysis and after-visit discussion, we will study the following aspects of each site:

  • Elements of the design
  • Traditional techniques/methods
  • Plant associations - plant combinations – The art of associating plants for effect, be it colour, texture, historic association or other landscape considerations.
  • Garden history - garden period and the characteristic features, fashion, influential plantsmen and designers. 

An interest in garden history and design is required. You must attend a full day preparatory and orientation session two weeks before departure, and prepare your assigned site introduction.

Special Topics

These classes can include a component of international travel or work overseas.

SPEC2001.03: Topics in International Development

An opportunity for students to study introductory topics in international development, with a focus on agriculture and rural development. Topics may be defined by the individual student, a group of students, or faculty. The class is conducted by classes, tutorials, assignments, readings, and/or other appropriate activities. Students are encouraged to use international travel or study opportunities as a focus for the class, but this is not required. Topics must be supervised by a faculty member in the proposed area of interest, and approved by the Dean of Internationalization. Students must apply to the Dean of Internationalization at least six weeks before the semester start date.

IAGR 3001.03: Directed Studies in International Development (A)

Independent study of topics in international development at an advanced level, with a focus on agriculture and rural development. Topics are developed through literature review, assigned readings and discussion, and may include independent research. Students are expected to present the final project at a public seminar. Students are encouraged to use international travel or study opportunities as a focus, but this in not required. Topics must be supervised by a faculty member in the proposed area of interest, and approved by the Assitant Dean of Internationalization.  Students must apply to the Assistant Dean of Internationalization at least six weeks before the semester start date.  This course would normally be taken by undergraduate students in their final year.

NOTE: Fall, Winter or Summer
INSTRUCTOR(S): Coordinator: Assistant Dean of Internationalization
FORMAT: as arranged
PREREQUISITE: 90 credit hours or final-year standing

Classes with an International focus

IAGR 3000.03: Tropical Agriculture

This class will introduce the student to food production, storage, and handling systems in tropical and subtropical countries. The sustainability of these systems and issues that limit the use of the environment for long-term food production will be identified. Farming systems and the role of national/international research centres are examined. The instruction will include resource people from several disciplines.
Fall semester – Lecture 3 hours per week.

IAGR 2002.03: International Rural Development

This class explores the history, defining characteristics, and diversity of developing societies, with a focus on the people and issues of rural communities. Students will explore the main issues facing rural communities in developing regions, as well as the many cultural, social, political and economic factors that can impact the success of development projects and initiatives at the community level. Students will be expected to develop an understanding of a variety of perspectives on international community development and also to develop an appreciation for the opportunities and challenges of sustainable development in different societies and cultures.

Contact

For more information on international study, work, or internship opportunities for students, please contact the Dal AC Student Mobility Officer at intdalac@dal.ca.