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@CAT Seminar

Presented by : Kohei Kishida (Dalhousie)

Topic : Non-Locality, Contextuality, and Topology
Abstract: Non-locality and contextuality are among the most paradoxical properties
of quantum physics contradicting the intuitions behind classical physics. In addition
to their foundational significance, non-locality is fundamental to quantum information,
and recent studies suggest contextuality may constitute a key computational resource
of quantum computation. This has motivated inquiries into higher-level, structural
expressions of non-locality and contextuality that are independent of the concrete
formalism of quantum mechanics. One approach uses the mathematical tool of sheaf
theory, and has yielded the insight that non-locality and contextuality are topological in
nature.

Abstract: Non-locality and contextuality are among the most paradoxical properties of quantum physics contradicting the intuitions behind classical physics. In addition to their foundational significance, non-locality is fundamental to quantum information, and recent studies suggest contextuality may constitute a key computational resource of quantum computation. This has motivated inquiries into higher-level, structural expressions of non-locality and contextuality that are independent of the concrete formalism of quantum mechanics. One approach uses the mathematical tool of sheaf theory, and has yielded the insight that non-locality and contextuality are topological in nature.

In this talk, I first review several ideas as well as formal expressions of non-locality, and extract from them the topological formalism for quantum measurement scenarios and a characterization of non-locality in this formalism. In fact, as we show, the same characterization captures contextuality as well (so that non-locality amounts to a special case of contextuality). We will then illustrate the power of this higher-level, unifying formalism: On the one hand, it leads to several new methods of contextuality argument. On the other hand, it shows contextuality to be an ubiquitous phenomenon that can be found in various other disciplines.

This is joint work with Samson Abramsky, Rui Soares Barbosa, Ray Lal and Shane Mansfield.  

Category

Lectures, Seminars

Time

Location

Colloquium Room #319, Chase Building 

Cost

Free

Contact

Ellen Lynch