Dalhousie University - Inspiring Minds

 

A milestone moniker for Dal's Ag Campus gardens

- August 30, 2018

Planting the ceremonial Black Ash to mark the commeration of the Bicetennial Botanical Garden. Left: Dean David Gray; right: Art Stevens, manager, Aboriginal students (Nick Pearce photos)
Planting the ceremonial Black Ash to mark the commeration of the Bicetennial Botanical Garden. Left: Dean David Gray; right: Art Stevens, manager, Aboriginal students (Nick Pearce photos)

Named in honour of Dalhousie’s 200th anniversary in 2018, the Bicentennial Botanical Garden is known as the Faculty of Agriculture’s largest classroom, providing many hands-on learning opportunities for students and researchers alike.

The gardens received their new name last Saturday (August 25) at a commemeration ceremony that featured the planting of a Black Ash, or ‘Wisqoq’ in Mi’kmaq. The tree was designated as threatened under the Nova Scotia Endangered Species Act in 2013, and the Faculty of Agriculture has been working in partnership with Mi’kmawey Forestry as part of their conservation efforts.

The Bicentennial Botanical Garden comprises 11 hectares of unique and diverse features including wide-ranging plant collections as well as the largest Rock Garden east of Montreal. Shade, herb and bulb gardens, a butterfly meadow, an apple orchard and more beautify the busy campus.

“Our entire campus environment becomes a classroom of learning, conserving, sharing, growing and socializing,” said Dean and Campus Principal David Gray.

The Bicentennial Botanical garden received a Canada 150 Garden Experience designation last year in celebration of Canada’s 150th birthday and is featured on the Nova Scotia Provincial Garden road trip.


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