EES VIRTUAL SEMINAR VIA ZOOM - Ruija Wang

Induced Seismicity - The Last Straw on Faults?

Dr. Ruijia Wang
University of New Mexico, USA



Abstract:
North America has experienced many “man-made” earthquakes, where industrial operations reactivated natural faults and produced felt events. Among all the industrial activities, hydraulic fracturing and waste-water disposal are the leading reasons for inducing multiple M4-5 earthquakes in recent years. As most of the induced events occur on unknown intraplate faults, identification of such faults serves as the foundation for understanding the inducing mechanisms.

This presentation will share our source studies on two representative regions: (1) Alberta (Canada), where hydraulic fracturing caused a few famous “red-light” earthquakes, and (2) Raton Basin (NM&CO, United States), where years of waste-water disposal are accompanied by persistent earthquakes. We utilized multiple state-of-the-art tools to identify the induced events and resolve their focal mechanisms (i.e., faulting styles). The detailed fault structures and earthquake cycle statistics offer an observational base for understanding the role of human activities and mitigating the hazard of induced seismicity.

BIO:
Ruijia Wang is a currently postdoctoral research fellow at the University of New Mexico and she will move back to China for a faculty position at the Southern University of Science and Technology. Before joining UNM, she received her Ph.D. from the University of Alberta in 2018 and worked at the University of Western Ontario for a year. She is an observational seismologist interested in intraplate earthquakes, especially the abnormal ones associated with anthropogenic activities.
 

Time

Contact

Miao Zhang
miao.zhang@dal.ca