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Reading Course Collection

This collection includes reading courses conducted by MLIS and combined degree students from 1998 to present. Please note: Reading courses completed after 2013 will contain abstracts; prior to that abstracts were not collected.

Collections Development

Book Conservation and Library Preservation

Author: Mary Kathryn Arnold
Advisor: Karen Smith

Year: 2008/09

Connecting with Comics

Author: Sarah Ziolkowski
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2008/09

Romance Novels: A Collection Development Perspective

Author: Tamara Proulx
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2014/15

Abstract
With my reading course, I endeavored to explore the collection development process of romance novels in Canadian public libraries. By conducting a literature review as well as interviews with collections librarians working in the field, I discovered how the romance genre is viewed by professionals and how collection policies are applied in public libraries in across Canada. I have been able to conclude that key factors in the criteria for collection development include demand, and overwhelmingly format. 

Sound Collection Finding Aids

Author: Creighton Barrett
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2007/08

A Study of Academic Library Database Subscription: Marketing Framework and Evaluation Framework

Author: Mingyue Chen
Advisor: Michael Bliemel/Joyline Makani

Year: 2013/14


Development/Principles of LIS

Accreditation and Accountability

Author: Jaclyn Carter
Advisor: Norman Horrocks

Year: 2000/01

Censorship and Revolution: Past or Future

Author: Jaclyn Carter
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2000/01

Considering Community: A Radio Documentary

Author: Megan Clark
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2012/13

Core Competencies: An Investigation of their Relevance and Utility in Academic Libraries

Author: Heather Sanderson
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2002/03

Dalhousie-Kings Reading Club and the Reading Experiences of University Women between 1925 and 1950

Author: Heather MacFadyen
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2011/12

Digital Democracy

Author: Willi Peekhaus
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2002/03

Digital Memory

Author: Andrea Kampen
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2014/15

Abstract
Digital memory stores digital memory objects, which allows us to use digital images as cues to recall memory. These digital memories and digital memory objects are often housed in social media sites such as Instagram. Since Instagram’s inception in 2010, this social media platform has exploded in popularity and influence. Instagram is a photo-sharing service built around a smartphone application that allows users to filter or tint photos they have taken and share them with their networks. Social networking sites have become digital spaces where memory accumulates in the form of digital objects (texts, photographs, videos). The reading course consisted of the completion of an extensive literature review and the creation of theoretical framework. The framework is rooted in the research problem: How does the creation and interaction with digital memory objects of digital photos stored in the digital memory tool Instagram, accessed by a mobile device, impact our ability to recall memories?

Specifically, studying how the creation of content on Instagram impacts the encoding of a memory, and how the recall of the memory when using the digital photograph on Instagram impacts the recalled memory. This study is important because mobile technology and the use of images to share information is a growing trend As technology develops, so does human interaction with the technology. Understanding the impact that this practice has is important for further development of future technologies and provides techniques to measure the impact of current use.

Digital Reading and the Canadian Context: E-Book Publishing in Canada

Author: Lynn MacGregor
Advisor: Bill Maes

Year: 2007/08

The Economics of Information

Author: Charles Maina
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2002/03

Electronic Text Design Using XML

Author: Sean Hughes
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2003/04

Excellence in Science and Technology Librarianship

Author: Jennifer Zhao
Advisors: Jane Duffy & Sarah Stevenson

Year: 2006/07

Exploring Webcomics

Author: Maggie Pearson
Advisor: Keith Lawson
Year: 2014/15

Abstract
Comics are a narrative form which have grown in interesting ways under internet publishing. Many webcomic artists create works that are born digital: these works, when coupled with web based affordances, can become powerful and innovative visual communications tools. Blogs or personal websites are typical publishing platforms, and social media is often used to promote new webcomic posts. This reading course sought to examine how the elements and principles of design are used in the context of webcomics to transmit information between creator and audience. The partially arts-based research method included the creation of the digitally born webcomic "Reading(dis)Course", which can be viewed at www.readingdiscourse.wordpress.com. This was in turn used as a case study to propose best practices for the creation, publication, promotion, and archiving of a webcomic.

Hypermedia and the New Information Literacy

Author: Stuart Boon
Advisor: Heidi Julien

Year: 1999/00

Illustrations in the News: An Exploration in Canadian Print Culture

Author: Francesca Frati
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2002/03

The Influence of Copyright on Canadian Librarianship in the Digital Age

Author: Sandra O'Driscoll
Advisor: Sandra Toze

Year: 2015/16

Abstract

This course is designed to study the impact copyright has on Canadian librarianship. Copyright has always been a sensitive issue but even more so in the digital age. Through studying recent publications regarding copyright and librarianship, I hope to better understand the effects and ramifications of copyright and material usage in the context of Canadian libraries. The structure of the course focuses on existing literature with the intent to critically analyze the current approach to managing copyright restrictions, specifically digital material. The goal of this course is to write a paper for submission to an academic journal.

 

Intellectual Property

Author: Kim MacInnis
Advisor: Margaret Ann Wilkinson

Year: 2006/07

International Perspectives on Librarianship

Author: Greg Bak
Advisor: Norman Horrocks

Year: 1998/99

Introduction to Digital Preservation

Author: Harrison Enman & Dominique Taylor
Advisor: Creighton Barrett

Year: 2014/15

Abstract
This course will provide an overview of emerging theories, practices, and issues surrounding digital preservation. It will consider preservation frameworks and strategies, collections management practices and evaluation techniques, metadata theory and practice, and coding as they relate to the preservation of digital materials (born digital and analog-digital). Furthermore, the course will explore the multidisciplinary nature of digital preservation, which promotes interaction between information professionals from various disciplines.

Liberalism, Capitalism and Authorship: The Development of Copyright in the United Kingdom in the 18th and 19th Centuries

Author: Andrea McLellan
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2002/03

Librarian Attitudes Towards Open Source Software in Canadian Academic Libraries

Author: Kirsta Stapelfeldt
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2009/10

Open Access Publishing

Author: Creighton Barrett
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2008/09

Past, Present, and Future of Librarianship

Author: Deborah Hicks
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2005/06

Progressive Librarianship: Professional Identity, Gender and Librarianship in Nova Scotia During the 1930s

Author: Greg Bak
Advisor: Heidi Julien

Year: 1999/00

Psychogeography

Author: Andrea Kampen
Advisor: Jennifer Grek Martin
Year: 2014/15

Abstract
What distinguishes the map from the tracing is that it is entirely oriented toward an experimentation in contact with the real. The map does not reproduce an unconscious closed in upon itself; it constructs the unconscious” (Deleuze and Guattari, 1987, p. 12)

Geographical Information Software empowers us to gather, analyze, and visualize data that we collect from the world around us. With maps we are able to bring together the concrete aspects of geography with the more abstract perception by choosing how to present the information. The challenge is to identify how subjective perception influences the presentation of object experience. Psychogeography, was defined by French theorist Guy Debord as “the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, whether consciously organized or not, on the emotions and behavior of individuals” encouraged practitioners place perception at the forefront (Debord, 1955, p. 23). The project completed included a literature review of psychogeography and the data collection technique developed by Debord, dérive (drifting). The project then included the completion of two walks, each of which employed the practice and mindfulness presented by Debord. By using GIS technology, ArcGIS, the project visualized the data collected using cartographic and typographic techniques that attempted to best express the psychogeographic elements of the walk. The project offered an opportunity to examine new ways of collecting data through an emotional perspective and visualizing it in a concrete way.

A Qualitative Analysis of Scientific Citations and Potential Applications to Public Policy and Decision Making

Author: Gregory Hutton
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2007/08

In Reference to Management: Are the Skills Required for Entry-level Reference Positions Transferable to Senior Management Positions?

Author: Ryan Deschamps
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2002/03

Sharing Data, Information and Knowledge in Research Communities

Author: Deborah Hemming
Advisor: Lori McCay-Peet

Year: 2017

Abstract
The balancing act between the obvious benefits and risks of sharing data, information and knowledge was the inspiration behind this reading course. Why do researchers and research organizations choose to share and what holds them back? What motivates and inhibits the sharing of data, information and knowledge in the research context? Are there different dynamics at stake when sharing (a) data, (b) information, and (c) knowledge? To answer these questions, I completed an extensive literature review, finding and exploring literature related to data, information and knowledge exchange, research networks, research collaboration, and communities of practice. 

Theft & Security in Libraries: A Case Study of the South Shore Public Library in Nova Scotia

Author: Rosalind Morrison
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2009/10

Twentieth Century Canadian Archival History

Author: Nathaniel Smith
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2009/10

Women in the 19th Century Canadian Book Trade

Author: Hilary Lynd
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2014/15

Abstract
The history of the book trade in Canada is an active field of research. The development of Canada’s print culture, especially its periodical press, has been largely credited with aiding the development of a Canadian identity. While many of aspects of book history have been covered by the literature, explorations of the role of women are currently underdeveloped. In particular, the role of female workers in the book trade requires additional attention. The formation of trade unions by male workers cannot fully be understood without consideration of female workers, their participation in the production of print materials, and how male workers defined their status as master craftsmen against the “other” sex. This reading course will investigate the role of women workers in the book trade to address this gap in the literature. In particular, Nova Scotia print houses will be examined.


Informatics

Building Knowledge in Health Care

Author: Barbara Hill-Taylor
Advisor: Keith Lawson

Year: 2010/11

Canadian Pediatric Collaborative Community Health Models

Author: Sarah Visintini
Advisors: Jackie MacDonald & Heather Rose

Year: 2012/13

Data Science and Information Behaviour

Author: Scarlett Kelly
Advisor: Sandra Toze

Year: 2016/17

Abstract
In the time of big data, information and data are ubiquitous, increasing in volume, and complexity, and represent a cross-boundary phenomena. The use of technology offers opportunities to leverage the almost unlimited creation and storage of big data, which has reached beyond the human capacity of understanding and managing. The use of technology, such as data mining, AI, and machine learning to understand big data has become the only solution. Yet big data is fundamentally the creation of humans. The gap between the ambiguous and ever-changing natural language and the programmed learning with machines presents to be obstacles in the course of applying and advancing data mining technology.

This reading course is a combination of data science and information behaviour, which aims at achieving the initial understanding of data related technology through the lens of human factors and perspectives. Through learning about Python programming language and reviewing literature on the relations between human behaviours and data mining/artificial intelligence, the course helps make connection between data science and information behaviour. The final report makes recommendations for future research focused on information creation.

Digital Archives: Current Status and Trends with a Focus on Geospatial Data

Author: James Boxall
Advisor: Michael Moosberger

Year: 2003/04

Geospatial Information Management and Eco-Sustainability in the Seafood Industry

Author: Melissa Archibald
Advisor: James Boxall

Year: 2014/15

Abstract:
Geographic information systems provide an effective means of quickly compiling and sharing important spatial information. The eco-sustainability of seafood resources is one subject which is becoming increasingly important to both industry and to the average consumer. While geospatial information platforms exists in this field, the usability and ultimately effectiveness of these resources comes into question as use expands into a larger community with wide variety of individuals. Mass data and complicated information systems may result in misinformation or hinder the users' ability to access and use this information. Literature pertaining to the current trends in geospatial information theory and technology, traditional cartographic methods, effective design was reviewed and provides the basis for the development of an effective mapping system for eco-certification in the seafood industry. Drawing on the concepts of simplicity, logical organization and selecting appropriate data size and type a user-friendly GIS interface is developed which allows for easy accessibility and usability by a wide user base. Recommendations for GIS interfaces include the use of graphics and images over text, logical organization of data and function, appropriate language, and the size data should adequately reflect the type of user and the questions that the information will be used to answer.

GIS Access and Usage in Canadian Non-Profit Organizations

Author: Carlisle Kent
Advisor: James Boxall

Year: 2014/15

Abstract:
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) prove invaluable for organizations of all types. They enable the collection, manipulation, and dissemination of information in uniquely powerful ways. Public Participation GIS (PPGIS) is an approach to GIS data generation and use that can result in more robust and useful information for groups ranging from grassroots or local government organizations to global relief efforts. There are several key qualities to a system that provides the most effective PPGIS: namely, the usability, cost, timeliness, sustainability, community involvement, accuracy and validity, technological requirements, and end contributions to the community. Using these qualities as an evaluation framework, and keeping in mind other qualities and considerations borne out in the literature on GIS and PPGIS, three different examples of PPGIS provision are examined. All three of these are based on the system Ushahidi, a company based in Kenya that provides cloud-based, customizable systems to empower ordinary people. The cases are located around the globe: water supply monitoring in Afghanistan, violence and disease tracking in Liberia, and disaster notification in Washinton, USA. Conclusions from these evaluations include that PPGIS provision often supports the input of data with ease, but that the systems can be one-sided. While the public may benefit from serious issues being addressed through PPGIS notification systems, they are seldom able to interact with the information after its submission. The literature recommends that PPGIS provision by characterized by give-and-take. However, the evaluation suggests that in practice this may not be practical, due to limitations such as cost or government limitations and security. 

A Health Policy Language for Nova Scotia

Author: Jacqueline Phinney
Advisor: Jackie MacDonald

Year: 2011/12

Information to Improve Health in PEI First Nations Communities: A Review of Successful Food Security and Food Sovereignty Initiatives

Author: Robyn Gray
Advisor: Vivian Howard and Debbie Martin
Year: 
2015/16

Abstract

The objective of this literature review is to identify and summarize information relating to successful food security and sovereignty initiatives within First Nations communities to assist in the development of food security implementations in two First Nations communities on Prince Edward Island. This literature review was broken down into four broad strategies: increasing access to healthy foods, providing short term/emergency assistance in the form of charitable food assistance programs, examining the food security of Northern Aboriginal communities to extend beyond the local level, and improving access to traditional foods. Each broad initiative is then examined within the context of specific programs that have been pursued in these areas. The section regarding access to healthy foods addresses concepts like community gardening, community kitchens, and farmer’s markets – many of these initiatives have developed successfully in other communities, and have been known to increase the health of participants. Charitable food assistance programs are considered through multiple perspectives, in order to establish ways these initiatives can best provide users with nutritious foods. The section on food security of Northern Aboriginal communities examines ways in which the current system could be made more effective. The final section of this literature review, regarding access to traditional foods, explores ways in which education about traditional foods can be extended to different community members, and people with traditional skills can be encouraged to provide foods for those that are unable to provide for themselves. This literature review acknowledges that more than one initiative must be considered in order to improve the short-term and long-term state of food insecurity in First Nations communities, and the best implementations will be those that have thoroughly considered the conditions of each individual community. 

Navigating Parenthood in an Age of "Miracle Babies": The Context of Information Seeking and Use by Parents in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Author: Michelle Helliwell
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2001/02

Public Legal Education and Information in Canada: The Roles of Judges, Lawyers, and Law Librarians

Author: Adam Newman
Advisor: Heidi Julien

Year: 2000/01


Information Systems & Retrieval

Abstracting and Indexing, Grey Literature Discovery, and Database Evaluation

Author: Diana Castillo
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2017/18

Abstract

A traditional method of organizing information, abstracting and indexing (A&I) services focus on aiding researchers through listing short synopses of publications and distilling the relevant information to specific keywords. A&I services, such as the Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries Abstracts (ASFA), are particularly useful for identifying scientific grey literature, which may otherwise be unlisted or difficult for researchers to discover. The changing information landscape, however, leaves the future of ASFA and other A&I services uncertain. This reading course will focus on the current literature surrounding A&I, database evaluation for libraries, and will complete pilot interviews with librarians regarding information seeking behaviours.

AcademiaMap: Web-based Database Design, Management and Evaluation

Author: Emily LeGrand
Advisor: Anatoliy Gruzd

Year: 2012/13

Advanced Research Methods in HCI

Author: Emilie Dawe
Advisor: Elaine Toms

Year: 2004/05

Analysis & Design of Digital Heritage Systems: Crowdsourcing

Author: Domenic Rosati
Advisor: Patti Bannister

Year: 2016/17

Abstract
This course introduces the students to the fundamentals of software analysis and design through the completion of a term project with a local heritage organization. The course focuses on building the foundations of project management, requirements gathering, and system architecture introduced in previous courses. The focus of the course will be the analysis of software, infrastructure, and organizational requirements given by the client and the proposal of an appropriate software design according software design methods such as uml diagrams, prototyping, and user interface design. Successful completion of the course will give students confidence needed to participate in software development projects in their career.

Archives & Social Media

Authors: Jocelyn Wedel & Mariah Blackmore
Advisor: Patti Bannister
Year: 
2015/16

Abstract

Archives and Social Media examined the topic of social media use within archives as a form of outreach and programming. It provided an overview and understanding of policies and procedures, content and audience of an archives’ use of social media. The goal of this course was to research an advanced and focused topic within archival theory and practice, specifically regarding social media in terms of programming and outreach. This included examining the current and emerging standards involved with social media outreach and programming, understanding the key elements of social media policy - including copyright and privacy, understanding the current and emerging issues and theories of digital content - including technical challenges, human resource management issues, measurement and evaluation for social media platforms, and digital-born materials, having an in-depth understanding of outreach, programming and user experience archival theories and practices within the online environment of social media platforms, and examining the various ethical, legal, cultural and political issues associated with core archival functions when working in an online social media environment.

Automating the Library System of the Royal Institute of Management, Bhutan

Author: Kesang Dechen
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2001/02

Client-side Web Development

Author: Harrison Enman & Dominique Taylor
Advisor: Mike Smit

Year: 2014/15

Abstract
Library users expect library catalogues and resources to keep up with technological developments: advanced functions, such as journal databases, should be accessible on mobile devices; library catalogues and journals ought to reflect the users’ everyday online experiences (e.g.,  effective keyword searching, social tagging, and resource compiling/tracking). While libraries and publishers are attempting to keep up with such user expectations, often times these advances come at the cost of usability (e.g., many library sites have turned into “link farms“ and e-journals are either mired in usability-related DRM issues or seem to have eschewed usability for the sake of open access).

This course will provide an overview of emerging theories and practices of dynamic web design as they relate to the usability and visual appeal of Academic information resource management (e.g., user interfaces of libraries and/or open access journals). It will consider all aspects of web design – from conception to deployment – including wireframing, prototyping, HTML5, pre-processing (SASS, SCSS, LESS), style frameworks/libraries (Bootstrap, Foundation, and Bourbon, etc.), AJAX, JQuery, and mobile first responsive design.

This course will consider user-centered design principles, usability testing, and information architecture. Along these lines, this course will explore the collaborative aspects of web planning and development. Finally, Web Development 2.0 will examine the design implications of managing academic information resources (i.e., the connection between frontend and backend development in libraries), such as the design constraints involved in dealing with large-scale databases and complex user queries.

Computer Assisted Research and Analysis

Author: Laura Landon
Advisor: Fred Vallance-Jones

Year: 2009/10

Cross-Language Information Retrieval: An Investigation of English-Chinese Issues

Author: Jing Yang
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2002/03

Database Proficiencies

Author: Danielle Hubbard
Advisor: Keith Lawson

Year: 2012/13

Data Mining

Author: Marroon Thabane
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2001/02

Designing and Implementing a Free/Open-Source Library Automation System for the Anchor Archive Regional Zine Project

Authors: Zachary Howarth-Schueler & Amanda Stevens
Advisor: Mark Leggott

Year: 2007/08

Designing Web Usability

Author: Nicole Dixon
Advisors: Vivian Howard & Keith Lawson

Year: 2010/11

Design of a Research Data Management Centre using SharePoint 2010

Author: Mengjia Zhang
Advisor: Jacqueline MacDonald

Year: 2013/14

Engineering Data-Intensive Applications: Using Graph Technology and Machine Learning to Address Patent Search and Discoverability

Author: Domenic Rosati
Advisors: Ryan Whalen

Year: 2016/17

Abstract
The purpose of this course is to build on competencies built in data management and data science to build and develop a deployable data-intensive application. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of machine learning and the data engineering techniques that are used in industry to take machine learning and big data solutions to production. The aim of the course is to apply an already solved machine learning problem and build an application around it through: advanced database management, distributed computing, data infrastructure, and application development. Particular attention will be paid to a big data project that requires distributed computing and storage. Successful completion of this course will prepare students to excel in organizations that wish to apply machine learning in production or manage data at scale.

Evaluating and Implementing Database Technologies for Storing/Processing Large Volumes of Data from Social Media

Author: Kathleen Dimmer
Advisor: Anatoliy Gruzd

Year: 2012/13

Generating Information: Using GIS to Visualize and Derive Meaning from Government Data

Author: Catherine McGoveran
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2012/13

Governance On-Line

Author: Peggy Chapman
Advisor: Heidi Julien

Year: 1999/00

How Search Engines Work with Chinese Queries

Author: Hong Cui
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2002/03

Human-Computer Interaction

Author: Katherine Loker
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2002/03

Image Retrieval

Author: Lori McCay-Peet
Advisor: Elaine Toms

Year: 2007/08

Information Architecture for the Web

Authors: Andrew Darby & Ian MacIntyre
Advisor: Elaine Toms

Year: 1998/99

Information Management of Major Government Transfer Programmes: First Nations Experiences

Author: Monique Woroniak
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2006/07

Information Seeking to Inform Food Selection

Author: Marc McCumber
Advisor: Sandra Toze

Year: 2013/14

Abstract:
Information needs are secondary needs that emerge from the more basic primary needs of the individual. Depending on the context - a complex combination of internal and external factors making up the individual experience of reality - any combination of needs may prompt information needs within the individual, resulting in information seeking behaviour. As modern food production has become increasingly complex and the relationship between diet and disease has become increasingly recognized, the importance of communicating relevant food and nutrition information to the general population has become a priority. Food labelling is seen as a population-level approach to communicating this information, and a great deal research has been conducted on how consumers use the information on food labels to make food purchase decisions. Through this reading course, the interdisciplinary body of research related to the seeking, understanding, and use of nutrition information, with the objective of informing a thesis project on a related topic.

Intranet Design & Implementation

Authors: Andrew Darby & Ian MacIntyre
Advisor: Elaine Toms

Year: 1999/00

Managing Smartphones in the Modern Enterprise

Author: Douglas Seaman
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2010/11

Model Behaviour: The Information Seeking Behaviour of Artists and Information's Role in the Creative Process

Author: Jodi McLaughlin
Advisor: Elaine Toms

Year: 2007/08

Multitasking Information Behaviour in Today's Knowledge Economy

Author: Angela Manyangara
Advisor: Elaine Toms

Year: 2008/09

Online Social Media and the Arts: A case study examining the Stratford Shakespeare Festival's use of Twitter

Author: Amanda Wilk
Advisor: Anatoliy Gruzd

Year: 2011/12

Open Source Software: UPEI's Virtual Reference Environment Project

Author: Lise Brin
Advisor: Mark Leggott

Year: 2007/08

Prospect Research in Fundraising and Non-profit Environments

Author: Katie MacDonald
Advisor: Sandra Toze

Year: 2011/12

Research Data Management

Author: Catherine Tess Grynoch
Advisor: Mike Smit and Sarah Stevenson

Year: 2016

Abstract
As the open data movement gathers momentum, funders and journals alike are requiring researchers to share and archive their data in open data repositories. As a result, academic libraries are increasingly being asked to support researchers through providing research data management services including housing data repositories, assisting in data management plan creation, and educating faculty, staff, and students on research data management and future trends through an evaluation of current literature. Students will be engaged in a case study of an active researcher in need of data management assistance, and working with them to understand their requirements, capabilities, and the gaps in between, along with an assessment of the extent to which the Dalhousie Libraries can bridge those gaps with the resources they have.

RFID/GIS Applications

Author: Nola Russell
Advisor: James Boxall

Year: 2008/09

The Second Screen Experience: A Case Study Examining Interconnections Among Tweeters Using Tablets as Second Screens While Watching a Live TV Show

Author: Lama Khoshaim
Advisor: Anatoliy Gruzd

Year: 2013/14

Usability Testing the Dalhousie Libraries' Prototype Website

Author: Charlotte MacKeigan
Advisor: Mike Smit and Sarah Stevenson

Year: 2015

Abstract
The purpose of this course was to assess the usability of the Dalhousie Libraries prototype website’s information architecture and general user experience, and provide recommendations for its improvement. Usability testing is a method of evaluating the functionality of a website by testing it with representative users. Six students and two faculty members were recruited for a talk-aloud usability test and asked to perform a series of tasks based on information commonly sought by these two user groups. The test identified several usability issues including confusing terminology, difficulty finding databases, and difficulty finding the institutional repository. The final report includes recommendations to rectify the most significant usability issues and for improving the overall user experience of the Libraries homepage based on participants’ comments.

User Interface and Information Architecture

Author: Jason Harris
Advisor: Keith Lawson

Year: 2011/12

Using Geographic Information Systems to Answer Genealogical Questions

Author: Kallen Rutledge
Advisor: Keith Lawson and Charlie Walls

Year: 2013/14

Visualization and Examination of Scholarly Conversations and Information Sharing on Twitter

Author: Melissa Anez
Advisor: Anatoliy Gruzd

Year: 2011/12


Management/Administration

Community Participation and Professional Collaboration in Community Archives: A Literature Review

Author: Alison Froese-Stoddard
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2013/14

Management Consulting

Author: Julie McLellan
Advisor: Sunny Marche

Year: 2008/09


Organization of Information

The Application of Information Technology to the Records Management Field: A Case Study

Author: Lidia Zykova
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2010/11

Archival Arrangement and Description: Advanced Topics and Musical Records

Author: Rebecca Shaw
Advisor: Creighton Barrett

Year: 2016/17

The Archives of Neptune Theatre: An XML and EAD Guide

Author: Geoff Brown
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2002/03

Best Metadata Practices for Video as an Information Source

Author: Nick Manuel
Advisor: Jennifer Grek Martin

Year: 2015/16

Cataloguing & Classification II

Author: Peter Stephen & Danielle Scanlan
Advisor: Peter Glenister

Year: 2016

Abstract
Bibliographic metadata is commonly created using Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR2). Since the publication of Resource and Description Access (RDA) in 2010, libraries and cataloguing agencies have increasingly turned to this new standard. The goal of this reading course is to continue to develop students' understanding of cataloguing rules and standards established in Cataloguing I, with a focus on RDA. Students successfully completing this course will be well-prepared for pursuing a career relating to bibliographic metadata through their continued development of these skills. 

Cataloguing and Classification of Arabic Materials

Author: Sean Swanick
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2008/09

Concordance and Correlation: Comparing Performance Indicators In Mined Company Profile Directories

Author: Zachary Howarth-Schueler
Advisor: David Roach

Year: 2008/09

Contemporary Issues in Media Archives

Author: Kevin Hartford
Advisor: Creighton Barrett

Year: 2012/13

Corporate Information Management: Handbook and Best Practices

Author: Anne Hvidsten
Advisor: Sandra Toze

Year: 2016

Abstract

This report presents a holistic approach to the current state of corporate IM, covering its most important aspects. It was developed with the goal of serving as a handbook on IM for businesses who are seeking a clarification of the concept of IM, or are planning on developing an IM strategy. A variety of current white papers on business technology and IM practices were consulted. The report is divided into two sections, where part A provides explanations and clarifications of five IM concepts: IM definitions, types of corporate information, the information life cycle, information systems, and skills and competencies that are essential to succeed as an information professional today. Part A forms the basis and necessary background information for part B, which is a set of best practices on four fundamental areas of IM: Records management, information risk management, data governance, and legal compliance. These best practices are applicable to any organization who seeks to strengthen its internal policies and procedures related to these areas of IM. In addition to the contents of part A and B, a list of useful resources is provided, which includes a link to an online IM/IT glossary.

The Development and Application of the Dublin Core

Author: Rebecca Larocque
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2000/01

Digital Management in Archives

Author: Riel Gallant
Advisor: Michael Moosberger

Year: 2012/13

A Dublin Core Survey and Business Application Strategy

Author: Joanne Hodder
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2003/04

Factors in the Construction of Records Management Policies

Author: Sandra Baigent
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2004/05

Information Management Strategies for Government

Authors: Hilary Lynd & James Rothwell
Advisor: Mike Smit

Year: 2014/15

Abstract:
Delivery of public services is dependent on evidence-based decision-making, and well-organized and accessible information. Important issues relating to this field include privacy, public access to government information, and breaking down silos for greater information sharing across departments. This reading course will explore both theories and practical measures for managing government information professionally, effectively, and with accountability. This course will provide students with an understanding of the current challenges facing government information managers today.

Knowledge Management in the Public Sector

Authors: Madeline Driscoll & Danika Kowpak
Advisor: Sandra Toze

Year: 2012/13

Knowledge Management: The Development of an International Admissions Database for Dalhousie University

Author: Bianca DiNardo
Advisor: Asa Kachan

Year: 2006/07

Medical Periodical Indexing: Creation of an Online Index to the Maritime Medical News and the Nova Scotia Medical Journal

Author: Kelly McIvor
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2006/07

The Naming and Organization of Living Things: A Study of Systems of Nomenclature

Author: Philippa Cummings
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 1999/00

Nova Scotia District Health Authority Records Management Project

Author: Stephanie Woods
Advisors: Jackie MacDonald & Louise Spiteri

Year: 2012/13

Processes for Community Archiving

Author: Braden Cannon
Advisor: Kathryn Harvey

Year: 2008/09

Readings in Archival Appraisal

Author: Jennifer Lambert
Advisor: Michael Moosberger

Year: 2011/12


Services to User Populations

Aboriginal Literacy and Reading Practices in Halifax, Nova Scotia

Author: Christine Wu
Advisor: Vivian Howard
Year:
2013/14

Abstract:
Literacy and reading practices are linked to higher education, social abilities, empathy, and critical thinking. According to the Assembly of First Nations, many Aboriginal communities face a variety of barriers to reaping the benefits of reading. This reading course proposes to obtain an overview of existing literature on literacy, reading practices, and barriers to reading for Aboriginal communities. This course will also determine current practices and barriers to reading of a sample of Aboriginal adults living in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Data collected will be analyzed and compared to existing research with aims to propose recommendations for improving literacy and reading practices. Research from this course is intended to add to the field of literacy and reading in Canadian Aboriginal communities and augment the National Reading Campaign’s focus on improving information-fluency and promoting life-long learning.

Academic Libraries and Writing Centres Co-Existing to Better Serve Their Students

Author: Keri McCaffrey
Advisor: Margie Clow-Bohan & Sandra Toze

Year: 2015/16

Abstract
The focus of this course was to research how writing centres and academic libraries are working together to serve students. The research found and categorized any actions taken between the two services to create joint initiatives that better serve their students, and also looked for gaps, or a lack of relationships between them. How students write and research was used to inform the usefulness of the two being a combined effort, and to show that writing centre and libraries’ relationships should be mimicking the student’s ways of completing papers. Additionally, the different factors that constitute useful interdisciplinary collaboration were used to create a checklist to measure the collaborations against. This checklist highlighted what the collaborations are doing effectively, and what they are missing, in order to better serve their students.

Atlantic Children's Authors in Digital Database

Author: Danielle Hubbard
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2012/13

Citizenship for the New Millenium: Access and Competence

Author: Leo Deveau
Advisor: Heidi Julien

Year: 1999/00

Community-Led Services

Authors: Jenna Knorr & Elizabeth O'Brien
Advisor: Vivian Howard
Year: 
2015/16

Abstract

The community-led approach to outreach is an emerging model being adopted by Canadian library systems. For public libraries especially, this service model can help libraries to become even more inclusive and welcoming for patrons of all kinds. For this research project, the research team used the philosophies and principles of the Community-Led Library Service Model to establish a partnership between Shelter Nova Scotia and Halifax Public Libraries. We conducted a literature review of service toolkits that have been prepared by library systems across Canada, as well as scholarly and news articles about community-led programs that are being implemented in Canadian, British, and American library systems. By meeting with staff at both organizations and with clients of Shelter Nova Scotia, the research team collected stories both of triumphs and of barriers that those who are experiencing homelessness face when using the public library in the Halifax Regional Municipality. Through data collection and qualitative data analysis, we were able to make recommendations to both organizations on how to strengthen their service offerings to better serve their patrons and also to improve the relationship between Shelter Nova Scotia and Halifax Public Libraries.

Connecting with Youth: The Importance of Community Engagement to Rural Public Libraries

Author: Heather Reid
Advisor: Vivian Howard
Year:
2014/15

Abstract
While the topic of community engagement in rural public libraries is something that has been heavily researched in areas such as the United Kingdom and Australia, it remains largely untouched in Nova Scotia. With the province’s dwindling rural populations leading to fewer library users, it stands that community engagement could be an essential part of connecting Nova Scotia’s rural public libraries with their communities – particularly in terms of youth. The aim of this study was to determine how and if community engagement is being employed in Nova Scotia. Librarians from 8 largely rural library systems across the province were interviewed regarding the current youth presence in their libraries, what programs and services are currently being offered to youth in their libraries, what community engagement practices were currently being used within their libraries, and how their patrons (particularly youth) were reacting and responding to these practices. This paper synthesizes the information derived from these interviews and provides a summary of the community engagement efforts being made throughout Nova Scotia. This study ultimately determined that while librarians in rural Nova Scotia face a number of challenges when attempting to implement community engagement (small budgets, low staffing numbers, etcetera), they remain extremely passionate about the topic and dedicated to serving their communities in the most meaningful way possible. 

Dalhousie Library LibGuides: A Faculty's Perspective

Author: Gabrielle Brydges
Advisor: Sandra Toze/Sarah Stevenson

Year: 2014/15

Abstract:
The field of Library and Information Studies is evolving. With the vast amount of information available, both digitally and in print, research has become, in many ways, more difficult. One of the ways that libraries are combating this information overload is to have subject specialists create specific subject guides that will steer students in the right direction when conducting research. Although the LibGuide software for creating subject guides has been available since 2007, most of the research has been focused on how students use the LibGuides.  This study focused on gaining a better understanding of how teaching faculty view LibGuides and how the teaching faculty utilize them at Dalhousie. Since faculty play such a vital role in scholarly research, it is important that a study be done to view the LibGuides through the faculty lens.

The research design was three-pronged.  The first component of this study was an analysis of the literature. The second component involved a focus group made up of librarians from the different campuses at Dalhousie. The focus group validated the survey questions and these questions were used to facilitate discussion on the similar/different experiences that the focus group had regarding LibGuides. The third component was data collected through the surveys given to a variety of teaching faculty within the Faculties of: Agriculture, Architecture and Planning, Computer Science, Health Professions and Management. Findings from this study can be viewed as a catalyst for conversation and as a pilot study for future examinations into the improvement of the Dalhousie LibGuides. One interesting finding was that 85% of the faculty respondents were unaware of the LibGuides and that there is a further need for promotion of the guides in the future.

Designing Information Literacy Instruction for Foreign Students

Author: Yusuke Ishimura
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2005/06

Early Literacy Programming at Halifax Public Libraries

Author: Kathleen Bowers
Advisor: Vivian Howard (SIM), Cynthia Gatto (HPL)
Year: 
2015/16

Abstract

Library staff at Halifax Public Libraries have been testing a cooperative preschool planning method for several years. Cooperative planning involves partnering staff members from different library branches to share the workload of preparing a session of preschool programs. Each programmer chooses the books and activities for half of the session’s programs, then these programs are shared between the branches. Opinions on this method of program planning vary – some programmers like sharing the workload and getting new ideas, while others enjoy the creative process of preparing their own programs. The survey in this reading course aimed to evaluate these opinions and make some recommendations as to how a consistent process could be implemented going forward. 

Empathy Aloud: Shared Reading as a Means for Strengthening the Practice of Empathy

Author: Lauren Bull & Alison Brown
Advisor: Vivian Howard
Year: 
2016/17

An Examination of Marketing Practices and Opportunities in North American Public Libraries: Implications for the Halifax Public Libraries System

Author: Jocelyn Covert
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2009/10

GIS and Spatial Literacy

Author: Alyssa Harder
Advisor: James Boxall
Year: 2013/14

Abstract:
The increasing relevance of spatial data in global, local and personal decision making means that spatial literacy is an increasingly necessary skill. Geography education research seeks to understand the barriers to its integration (among other things) and answer questions such as how spatial literacy should be taught, and the development of spatial intelligence through childhood. This course will focus on how geographic information sciences (GIS) and geospatial technologies can be used to teach spatial literacy. It will also examine what spatial literacy is, and how it is taught and integrated into k-12 curriculums. As such, the purpose of this course is to gain a comprehensive understanding of how spatial literacy differs (and does not differ) from general information literacy, and how GIS can be utilized to teach it.

GLBT Library Users and Services

Author: Carrie McClary
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2005/06

Halifax Public Libraries Serving the Information Needs of Newcomers

Author: Wendy Archer
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2005/06

The Influence and Use of Grey Literature: A Case Study

Author: Julie Woods
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2009/10

Information Literacy for Special Populations

Author: Rachel Kelly & David Michels
Advisor: Heidi Julien

Year: 1999/00

Information Literacy Instruction and Humanities for Undergraduates: Are Current Models Appropriate for English Scholarship

Author: David Tughan
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2004/05

Information Literacy in the Workplace

Author: Cynthia Lelliott
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2006/07

Information Seeking, Needs and Use in Coastal and Ocean Management

Author: Jennifer Weldon
Advisor: Elaine Toms

Year: 2010/11

Information to Improve Health in PEI First Nations Communities: A Review of Successful Food Security and Food Sovereignty Initiatives

Author: Robyn Gray
Advisor: Vivian Howard & Debbie Martin
Year: 
2015/16

Interest and ownership: Creating a Medical Journal for the Maritime Provinces, 1888-1910

Author: Robin Parker
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2009/10

An Investigation of 3D Printing and Scanning Technologies and their Potential Role in Academic Libraries

Author: Riel Gallant & Michael Groenendyk
Advisor: Keith Lawson

Year: 2012/13

Law Students and Information Literacy

Author: Amy Dietrich

Year: 2005/06

Legal Technology: Predictive Coding in e-Discovery

Author: Andrew Roy
Advisor: Ryan Whalen
Year: 
2016/17

Library Programming for Children and Young Adults

Author: Kira McGann
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2001/02

Library Services for Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Youth

Author: Michele Hilton
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2002/03

Measuring the Value of Public Library Services: An Outline for Nova Scotia

Author: Geoffrey Allen
Advisor: Fiona Black

Year: 2009/10

National Survey of Early Literacy Programs

Authors: Naomi Balla-Boudreau & Deirdre O'Reilly
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2009/10

Native Literature for Children

Author: Joanne Deluney
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2001/02

One Book Nova Scotia: A Case Study of Mass Reading Events

Author: Alyssa Harder
Advisor: Vivian Howard
Year: 2013/14

Abstract:
‘Mass reading events’ are large-scale events that encourage collective reading and community building through the shared experience of reading a book (or books) at the same time. Social media, of course, can be a powerful tool in contemporary reading culture. Studying mass reading events reveals how and why readers engage with books, and each other. This course will focus on the One Book Nova Scotia reading initiative. This mass reading event is a province-wide book club that aims to encourage as many Nova Scotians as possible to read the selected book – the 2013 selection being Fauna by Alissa York – and share their thoughts on the book. It is meant to encourage reading across the province and assist communities in building a culture of reading using public events and social media. Thus the purpose of this course is to understand reader engagement with books and other individuals during a mass reading event in a digital context.

On Reading

Author: Lise Brin
Advisor: Keith Lawson

Year: 2007/08

Parental Perceptions of Reading Apps: Beneficial or Detrimental to Language and Cognitive Development of Preschool Children?

Author: Maureen Wallace
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2014/15

Abstract:
The goal of study was to gain an understanding of what parents of preschool aged children believe to be the aspects of a good multimedia reading app, and what criteria goes into selecting which apps they will use with their children. There is an abundance of research done on the benefits of traditional reading practices. However, reading apps are a fairly new technology, and as a result they have not been researched to the same extent. Even less has been done on parental perceptions on reading apps and what they believe the benefits of such apps are. This study focused on gaining a better understanding of how parent's perceived multimedia reading apps compared to traditional reading practices. The benefits and disadvantages of reading apps were also examined to see if parental perceptions match the current research. This study adds to the current literature and fill in the gaps on parental perceptions on their benefits.

Patient Education Information Management Services

Author: Ryan Dyck
Advisor: Jackie MacDonald

Year: 2012/13

Photovoice as a Method for Revealing the Everyday Life Information-Seeking Behaviours of Teenage Mothers

Author: Alison Brown
Advisor: Jennifer Grek Martin & Vivian Howard

Year: 2016/17

Abstract:
Everyday life information-seeking behaviour is widely understood to be shaped by both personal and social contexts. Those contexts dramatically change when becoming a mother, particularly when the mothers are young and socially excluded. Photovoice is a participatory research method that seeks to amplify the voices of those who are socially excluded. Participants are given cameras and the opportunity to document their lived experience with the intent to influence community change. This reading course will review, analyse, synthesize, and identify the gaps in what has been published with regard to the use and effectiveness of Photovoice as a research method in library and information science, and the everyday life information-seeking behaviours of socially excluded mothers. The literature review will inform the design of a Photovoice project that will allow socially excluded mothers to identify and represent their information practices.

Programs and Resources for Students in Architecture School Libraries

Author: Sarah Davis
Advisor: Sandra Toze

Year: 2015/16

"Publish and Flourish"? An Examination of Library-based Publishing Initiatives in Academic Libraries

Author: Roger Gillis
Advisor: Keith Lawson

Year: 2012/13

Reading on the Spectrum: Asperger's Syndrome and Fiction

Author: Emilie Williamson Streich
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2015/16

Abstract:
People with Asperger's Syndrome have been subjected to myriad stereotypes since the condition experienced its vogue several years ago, one of which is a supposed distate for reading fiction books. This stereotype has two contributing factors: The first is the notion that people with AS have no capacity for empathy, and therefore cannot work out or follow a fictional character's intentions. The second is the belief that people with AS are purely concrete thinkers averse to abstract thought (e.g. figurative language), despite being in direct opposition to Dr. Hans Asperger's seminal writings. Much of the literature on AS is vague, prejudiced, and contradictory. There is no previous research focusing on the relationship between people with AS and fiction reading; for this project, I have gathered qualitative information about this topic from email interviews with several people diagnosed with AS.

Services and Resources for Children

Author: Michele Hilton
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2002/03

Special Topics in Youth Services

Author: Sarah MacLean
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2005/06

Trends in Technology and Design: Teen Spaces in Small Public Libraries

Author: Tasya Tymczyszyn
Advisors: Fiona Black & Eric Stackhouse

Year: 2008/09

Understanding the Dissemination and Use of Grey Literature: A Case Study

Author: Danielle Cossarini
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2009/10

The Use of Graphic Novels in Public and Academic Libraries

Author: Kevin Hartford
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2012/13

The Use of Grey Literature in Science and Technology

Author: Ruth Cordes
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2001/02

Web-based Psychological Services

Author: Emily Colford
Advisor: Mike Smit/Alissa Pencer

Year: 2014/15

Abstract
The affordances of smart technology provide new avenues of information gathering practices in the field of clinical psychology and psychiatry. Gathering information from clients is integral to the diagnosis and treatment, however, this information exchange is restricted by the high cost of face to face hourly sessions. Smart technology has been shown to improve access and adherence to clinical treatment and provides clinicians with new methods for objective data collection in day to day life. With this in hand, the project aims to create a demo application that improves information exchange between client and clinician. Currently existing applications in this field are examined and discussed, as well as safety and privacy concerns. The demo application is available on a remote server.

Writing, Publishing, and the Children's Book Trade in Canada

Authors: Ben Worth & Maria Bartlett
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2014/15

Abstract (Ben):
This reading course explores the history and breadth of literature produced for children by Atlantic Canadians. Atlantic Canada has a long rich tradition of storytelling. There are many children's books that convey this tradition and demonstrate the importance of place in Atlantic writing, but these stories are underrepresented outside of the region. Topics covered include a brief overview of the qualities of current and past favourite picture books, interviewing local professionals involved in the children's book trade, and creating an illustrated children's book. Through this course students will gain a broader perspective of Atlantic Canadian writing, an understanding of the publishing process, and familiarity with the steps required to craft a picture book.

Abstract (Maria):
This reading course will focus on Atlantic Canadian children's literature. Due to the vast and extensive history of children's literatures within the Maritimes, this course has been divided into three sections. The first section includes the comparison of a contemporary piece of children's literature to an older favourite. The second section of the course will involve interviewing a local entrepreneur who has extensive experience with children's literature in Atlantic Canada. The third section of the course provides students with the opportunity to author and illustrate a children's picture book of their own. Outcomes of this course include a well-rounded introduction to Atlantic Canadian children's literatures, and understanding of the picture book creation process and comprehension of book publishing procedures in Atlantic Canada.

Young Adult Literature and Media Interests

Author: Annette MacIntyre
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2001/02

Young Adult Use of E-books: An Analysis of Public Library Information & Resource Offerings

Author: Robyn Gray
Advisor: Vivian Howard
Year: 
2015/16

Abstract

“Young Adult Use of E-books: An Analysis of Public Library Information and Resource Offerings” explores public library e-book use by young adults. An online survey distributed to librarians at public libraries across North America established that some young adults are not aware of the ways that e-books can enhance their reading experiences. Even when e-books themselves are promoted through outreach programs, these programs do not emphasize the ways that a customized reading experience can be created. Some of the findings of this study are that e-book collections are often well promoted, but young adults prefer to use physical books. Young adults also do not show a lot of interest in e-book programs at their libraries, but several librarians who responded to the survey conduct class visits to promote the e-book collection as a form of outreach. Additionally, this study revealed that adults are some of the most frequent borrowers of young adult e-books.  Lastly, the survey found that few libraries loan out e-readers. The responses to this survey indicate that e-book collections themselves are being promoted, but the technologies associated with e-books that can enhance reading experiences are not necessarily offered or promoted. If these technologies were more heavily invested in and advertised amongst young adults, e-book usage among this population might increase.  


Types of Libraries & Information Providers

Curatorial Methodology and Practice

Author: Doyle Lahey
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2011/12

The Current Digital Curation Environment and Recommendations for LIS Education: A Study of Canadian Archives and Special Collections

Author: Nicole Bloudoff
Advisor: Fiona Black
Year:
2013/14

Abstract:
This paper analyses an exploration of the shifting relationships between digitization, digital curation, and special collections librarians and archivists. Examples of successful digital curation and preservation methods will be discussed. Issues already acknowledged in the literature on digital curation include technological obsolescence, lack of adequately trained staff, limited financial resources, as well as determining the return on investment of digitization projects. This study explores these and other factors affecting digital curation through the following research questions: Is it always worth it to digitize special collections? What makes a digital collection successful? How do special collections librarians and digital curators relate to one another in the decisions to create and manage these collections? Is digital curation becoming a required skill for these projects, and if so, should LIS curriculums be covering it? Does there need to be a theoretical shift with regard to LIS education in digital curatorship?

The study’s methodology includes expert interviews and an online survey of Canadian professionals. The paper provides insights into the current environment of LIS education in Canada in relation to digital curation. This paper will offer a new perspective benefiting the LIS, special collections, and archival communities-especially for those who are pondering the significance of digital curatorship in the future.

The Fundamentals of Information Entrepreneurship

Author: Michael Groenendyk
Advisor: Joyline Makani

Year: 2012/13

Fund Raising in Academic Libraries: A Comparative Perspective

Author: Leanne Wells
Advisor: Norman Horrocks

Year: 2001/02

Information Professionals Behind Bars: How Librarians Serve Patrons in Prison

Author: Leanne Owen
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2009/10

An Investigation of Chinese-Language Issues in North American Digital Libraries

Author: Hui Ping Luo
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 2001/02

Issues and Trends in Academic Libraries

Author: James Boxall
Advisor: William Maes

Year: 2001/02

Libraries as Space: Rethinking Roles, Rethinking Space in African Libraries

Author: Whitney Spencer
Advisor: Louise Spiteri

Year: 2011/12


Other

Analyzing Networks of Scientific Exchange Using Historical and Contemporary Evidence

Author: Valerie Collins
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2013/14

Awareness, Use, and Influence of State of the Environment Reports

Author: James Ross
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2012/13

Business Intelligence

Author: Jennifer Trainor
Advisor: Sandra Toze

Year: 2003/04

A Case Study of the Medley Library

Author: Mark Lewis
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 1998/99

Exploring the Relationship Between Substance Use and Economic Development: A Literature Review

Author: Kaitlin Haley
Advisor: Vivian Howard

Year: 2014/15

Abstract:
A skill developed through the SIM program is the ability to connect professionals with information sources relevant for their information needs. For this reading course a literature review was completed to contribute to a project called "Exploring the Relationship Between Substance Use and Economic Development in Atlantic Aboriginal Communities" led by Dr. Fred Wien. This project is looking into the complicated relationship between substance use and economic development. To complete this literature review, a search strategy was created and translated. In addition, grey literature produced by Atlantic First Nation communities was searched. The result of this literature review demonstrates that the literature available on these concepts does not adequately represent the relationship that exists between substance abuse and economic development.

Feminism and Essentialism

Author: Joanie Sebastian
Advisor: Heidi Julien

Year: 1999/00

Indigenous Knowledge and Canadian IP Law

Author: Lori O'Connor
Advisor: Margaret Ann Wilkinson

Year: 2005/06

Interactive Fiction

Author: Fiona Blainey
Advisor: Keith Lawson

Year: 2006/07

Library Automation Issues for Butan

Author: Kinzang Lhendup
Advisor: Haidar Moukdad

Year: 1999/00

Managers' Perceived Value of Information

Author: Lisa Pinet
Advisor: Heidi Julien

Year: 1998/99

The National Bibliography of Scottish Emigration: Literature in Canada

Author: Megan Butcher
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2000/01

The Role of Social Networks in Inter-organizational Communication: A Case Study of Tidal Power Networks in the Bay of Fundy

Author: Lee Wilson
Advisor: Bertrum MacDonald

Year: 2014/15

Abstract:
The results of climate change and environmental degeneration are now recognized as major challenges of our time. The development of Marine Renewable Energy resources, such as tidal power, represents one way climate change can be mitigated. The implementation of tidal power infrastructure within the Bay of Fundy is a multifaceted issue involving many stakeholders (e.g., municipal, provincial, and federal government agencies; NGOs; environmental groups; industry both foreign and domestic; universities; community groups; and First Nations communities) sometimes with competing interests. In Canada, complex coastal zone issues are governed by the Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) policy framework that strives to bring representation to affected stakeholders. The current literature suggests that strong channels of communication and stakeholder cooperation are vital to the success of complex, multi-stakeholder endeavours. With tidal turbine implementation in the Bay of Fundy becoming a reality, it is important to gain an understanding of how, and even if, stakeholder organizations are communicating about tidal power. A Social Network Analysis (SNA) examining inter-organizational communication channels between tidal power stakeholders could help to facilitate such an understanding. This reading course will provide foundational knowledge about the political and socio-economic context in which tidal power operates and how SNA can be used to study environmental and resource management issues.

A Start-up Toolkit for Competitive Intelligence

Author: Joanne Hodder
Advisor: Sandra Toze

Year: 2005/06