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KUDOS! Professor Michelle Williams chosen a Notable Nova Scotian

Posted by Jane Doucet on April 29, 2016 in Staff Interest, News, IB and M, Faculty Interest, Student Interest
Professor Michelle Williams (Photo: Riley Smith)
Professor Michelle Williams (Photo: Riley Smith)

Congratulations to Professor Michelle Williams, the director of the Schulich School of Law’s Indigenous Blacks & Mi’kmaq (IB&M) Initiative, who was recently named a Notable Nova Scotian by The Times of African Nova Scotians: A Celebration of Our History, Heritage and Culture, the second volume of a book written by Halifax author Tony Colaiacovo and published by the Delmore “Buddy” Daye Learning Institute. The book and its accompanying poster are intended to be educational resources for the Grade 11 African Canadian Studies curriculum in the province.

The selection committee chooses the Notable Nova Scotians based on various criteria; it could be a life’s body of work or a single significant achievement. “Michelle was chosen because she’s not only a Black lawyer but also a Black faculty member who teaches and inspires law students,” says Colaiacovo.

Sharing African Nova Scotian history and heritage through The Times of African Nova Scotians provides a fuller understanding of Nova Scotia’s history and raises awareness about the contributions that African Nova Scotians have made, and continue to make, in both the province and the country.

Michelle’s impact on the African Nova Scotian community is one that resonates over time and across generations. She has an amazing way of calmly bringing out the analysis on topics impacting the community and of getting people to think about the role of law and policy.
- Sylvia Parris, CEO, Delmore “Buddy” Daye Learning Institute

Sylvia Parris is the CEO of the Delmore “Buddy” Daye Learning Institute, which engages and empowers members of the African Canadian/Nova Scotian communities with opportunities to create the necessary changes needed to improve educational experiences, opportunities, and outcomes.

“Michelle’s impact on the African Nova Scotian community is one that resonates over time and across generations,” says Parris. “She has an amazing way of calmly bringing out the analysis on topics impacting the community and of getting people to think about the role of law and policy. She’s also a powerful speaker and a community builder. And it’s always wonderful to celebrate a Black woman’s achievements.”

Williams is one of five of our law school alumni who appear on the second volume of the Notable Nova Scotian list, along with retired judge Castor Henry Williams, Judge Jean Whalen, Kenneth David Crawford, QC, and The Honourable Valerie Miller, QC (there were four alumni in the first volume).

“African Nova Scotians are a distinct people who make extraordinary contributions to this province despite dealing with daily endemic anti-Black racism,” says Williams. “I felt entirely out of my league when I learned of the other honourees. I encourage everyone to take the time to learn about all of the notable African Nova Scotians in order to fully understand Nova Scotia itself.”