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Jennifer Silcox

Assistant Professor

jennifer-silcox

Related information

Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology

Email: jennifer.silcox@dal.ca
Mailing Address: 
Room 3012, McCain Building, 6135 University Avenue
PO Box 15000, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4R2
 
Research Topics:
  • Crime and deviance
  • Youth crime
  • Criminology
  • Feminist criminology
  • Socio-legal studies
  • Gender
  • Media
  • Social justice and inequality

Education

  • BSocSci, University of Ottawa
  • MA, PhD, University of Western Ontario

Research interests

Jennifer Silcox is a sociologist and criminologist who is interested in the social construction of crime. Her research explores media representations and statistical data of youth crime in Canada, and pays particular attention to the various factors and social structures that influence trends in these areas. Additionally, she explores how ideologies shape the creation and implementation of law. Her research finds support for Cohen’s (1972) conceptualization of moral panics as they relate to youth, teens of colour, and young people living in poverty. It also questions the stigmatization of youth as inherently troublesome, and calls for greater attention to be paid to the circumstances that limit social opportunities available to young people in trouble with the law.

Dr. Silcox has worked extensively in outreach, public education, community work, restorative justice, and rehabilitation. At the Elizabeth Fry Society of Ottawa, a non-profit organization that works with criminalized women and girls, she facilitated anger management groups, counseled and mentored girls, provided support for female offenders at the courthouse, and acted as an outreach worker for women involved (or at risk of being involved) in the sex trade. This experience led her to help develop and coordinate an organization providing a safe space for sex workers in her hometown of London, Ontario. While completing her PhD at the University of Western Ontario, she delivered yearly sessions on sexism and sexual violence to incoming student mentors and took part in restorative justice sessions representing victims of sexual harassment and hazing.

Selected conference papers

  • (2016) “The Influence of Crime Trends on Media Representations of Youth Crime in Canada”, accepted for presentation at the Annual Conference of the American Criminological Association, November 2016.
  • (2016) “Are teenagers more violent than before? News Media Distortions and Representations of Youth Crime in Canada”, presented at the Annual Conference of the Canadian Sociological Association at the 2016 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
  • (2016) “News Media Distortions and Representations of Youth Crime in Canada”, presented at the Annual Conference of the Canadian Sociological Association at the 2016 Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences.