More ideas for preventing plagiarism

 

This list provides a sample of the many ways you can promote academic integrity and deter academic offenses:

  • Define plagiarism and explain how to document sources.
  • Go over Dalhousie's policies in class.
  • Guide students to this website for further resources.
  • Help students understand why they should cite:
      • to help the reader if they are interested in reading further on the topic;
      • to show respect for fellow researchers;
      • to avoid plagiarism.
  • Model appropriate behaviour by providing references to lecture content.
  • Emphasize good citation style and the benefits of citation.
  • From The New Plagiarism: Seven Antidotes to Prevent Highway Robbery in an Electronic Age comes this idea — "stress green ink and citation ethics." Author Jamie McKenzie suggests students use black ink to write about ideas they've collected from others, and green ink to connote any ideas or conclusions the student has themselves made. In short: "Black signifies the ideas of others. Green text signifies fresh thinking." What makes this argument compelling is that it will force students to get away from the handy cut-and-paste method of having the Internet close at hand. During the process of their research, they'll actually distinguish between the ideas from others they're citing, and the original conclusions they're drawing for themselves.
  • Convince students that assignments are developed for their benefit and clarify what the benefits are: honest critical thinking, strengthens thinking ability, gains a wider view of subject, clarifies ideas; promotes lifelong learning and values thinking, analyzing, organizing, reasoning; develops the collection and organization of ideas and thoughts.
  • Explain why they should use sources for their paper:
      • strengthens their arguments;
      • adds interest to their paper;
      • provides new ideas;
      • reveals controversies;
      • helps them understand how reasoned argument works.
  • Visit paper mill sites and let your students know you do.
  • Take students to sites and analyze some of the weaker papers.
  • Demonstrate how to honestly incorporate web papers into their research.
  • Require the students to include a statement on their paper which declares that the work is their own unless cited.
  • Make sure students have the research skills necessary for doing the assignment; consider having a librarian teach them how to find appropriate resources.