Ingrid Waldron

Associate Professor, Dalhousie - FoH
Director, Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequities & Community Health Project (The ENRICH Project)
Co-Chair, Dalhousie - Black Faculty & Staff Caucus.

E-mail: iwaldron@dal.ca
Twitter: @iwaldron2165
View: Profile

Profile

Dr. Ingrid Waldron, PhD. was born in Montreal to Trinidadian parents. She is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Health at Dalhousie University, the Director of the Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequities & Community Health Project (The ENRICH Project), and the Co-Chair of Dalhousie University’s Black Faculty & Staff Caucus. She holds a BA in Psychology from McGill University, a MA in Intercultural Education: Race, Ethnicity & Culture from the Institute of Education at the University of London, and a Ph.D. from the Sociology and Equity Studies in Education Department at the University of Toronto. She was also a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Women’s Health in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto.

Ingrid’s scholarship is driven by a long-standing interest in looking at the many ways in which spaces and places are organized by structures of colonialism and gendered racial capitalism. Her research, teaching, and community leadership and advocacy work are examining and addressing the health impacts of structural inequalities within health, education, employment, child welfare, the environment, and criminal justice in Indigenous, Black, immigrant, refugee, and other racialized communities in Nova Scotia and Canada. As a Black feminist scholar, Ingrid has a specific interest in looking at how the bodies of Black and other racialized women have long been sites of trauma that carry the weight of the past, and present-day stereotypes that dehumanize and harm. She is also interested in decolonization, and the transformative human agency of Black, Indigenous, and other racialized women, in the face of oppressive structures.

Ingrid has conducted research in Halifax and Toronto on the health effects of environmental racism in Nova Scotia; gentrification and other structural determinants of health in the African Nova Scotian community in the North End of Halifax; experiences seeking help for depression and anxiety in Black, Indigenous, and other racially diverse communities in HRM; African Nova Scotian youth’s experiences seeking help for mental health problems; experiences of Black mental health professionals in Halifax; accessing and utilizing mental health services among Dalhousie nursing students; the health of immigrants in Halifax and Toronto; access to oral health services by recent immigrants and refugees in Nova Scotia; intimate partner violence experienced by racially and culturally diverse women in mid-life in Nova Scotia; protective factors influencing the entry and re-entry of African Nova Scotian, Indigenous, immigrant, and refugee children into state care in Nova Scotia; and the impacts of social supports and family ties on income insecurity and poverty in diverse families in Toronto.  

The ENRICH Project is investigating the socio-economic and health effects of environmental racism in Mi’kmaw and African Nova Scotian communities. It formed the basis to the creation of Bill 111: An Act to Address Environmental Racism, the first bill to address environmental racism in Canada and to be introduced in the legislature.

In 2018, Dr. Waldron was awarded Dalhousie University President’s Research Excellence Award – Research Impact. Her first book There’s Something in the Water: Environmental Racism in Indigenous and Black Communities was released in April 2018 by Fernwood Publishing.

Education 

MA, Intercultural Education: Race, Ethnicity & Culture from the Institute of Education, University of London
PhD, Sociology and Equity Studies in Education Department, University of Toronto. 

Research Interests

Health disparities in diverse communities (Black, Indigenous, immigrant, refugee, LGBTQ, elderly).
Racialization of psychiatric illness.
Mental illness in Black and other racialized communities in Canada.
Environmental racism and its health effects.
The impact of the built environment/public infrastructure on community health and well-being.

Notable Awards 

  • President’s Research Excellence Award – Research Impact, President’s Office, Dalhousie University, June 20, 2018.
  • Advocate of the Year Award for the year 2015 for “The Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequities and Community Health Project”, Better Politics Award, Springtide Collective, March 8, 2016.
  • Green Campaign of the Year Award, for “Time to Clear the Air: Art on Environmental Racism by Mi’kmaw and African Nova Scotian Youth”, Dalhousie Student Union Sustainability Office, Dalhousie University, April 2, 2015.
  • Annual Sunshine Award Second Place Prize for “The Environmental Noxiousness, Racial Inequities and Community Health Project”, Ecology Action Center, June 22, 2015.
  • Postdoctoral Ontario Women’s Health Scholars Award, Ontario Council on Graduate Studies & Ontario Women’s Health Council, Toronto, 2003-2006.
  • First Prize Award for my paper “Jezebel tales: Images of Black female sexuality and the marginalization of Afro American women’s rape by law enforcement” in the Twelfth Essay Competition on Women & the Law, National Association of Women & the Law Charitable Trust for Research & Education & Blake, Cassel & Graydon, Toronto, November 30, 1998.
  • Multiculturalism Scholarship, International Association for Volunteer Effort, Toronto, 1998.

Achievements

I am proud that my research, teaching, and community leadership has led to tangible impacts in Black, Indigenous, and other racialized communities by engaging and bringing together students in diverse disciplines, partners in diverse sectors and professions, and racially and culturally diverse communities across the province and country to find solutions to, mobilize on, and address the social, economic, political, legal, and health impacts of historical and present-day structural inequalities in racialized communities in Canada.

Recruiting Graduate Students Interested In

  • Health disparities in diverse communities (Black, Indigenous, immigrant, refugee, LGBTQ).
  • Racialization of psychiatric illness.
  • Mental illness in Black and other racialized communities in Canada.
  • Environmental racism and its health effects.
  • The impact of the built environment/public infrastructure on community health and well-being.

Recent Publications

Scopus ID#: 55863895600
Orcid ID#: 0000-0001-9173-957X