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Ava Czapalay (BA'86, BEd'92, MEd'95)

A day in the life

Ava Czapalay (BA'86, BEd'92, MEd'95)

ava_profile1

“If you ask presidents and CEOs what the most important thing is about their day to day job, it’s being able to communicate with people."

Selling the benefits of an English degree

 

Ava Czapalay is at the forefront of a fast-growing, competitive business: selling the benefits of a Nova Scotia education to students around the world.

As President and CEO of EduNova, Ava champions Nova Scotian universities and training organizations abroad, recruiting students and helping them recruit students and develop international partnerships.

“I was Dal’s first recruiter,” she remembers. During her time as Assistant Registrar of Admissions and Recruitment at Dalhousie, she pushed for more inter-university cooperation on international student recruitment. She co-ordinated province-wide efforts with the Nova Scotia government, then founded EduNova six years ago.

She’s been racking up air miles ever since.

Ava might be the perfect alumna to ask about the value of an English degree, because she remembers the skillful recruiter from the English department who brought her into the fold.

Soon after she signed up as a Biology major, her phone rang.

“They actually called me up and asked me if I’d consider switching my major to English. They did that back then! They poached me,” she laughs.

Ava is happy she made the switch.

“If you ask presidents and CEOs what the most important thing is about their day to day job, it’s being able to communicate with people,” she says.

She quickly lists all the great communicative strengths of English graduates: they think critically; they can present opinions and back them up; they’re good at public presentations; and they enjoy teamwork and sharing points of view.

“I think it fosters creativity and creative thought,” she says, “and that’s the kind of environment we’re working in here.”

The overall experience at Dal, she believes, offers the opportunity to get involved in the life of the university and the opportunity to meet faculty and students from around the world.

“Dal is a world class institution that is still relatively small and personal,” she says. “It’s a blend of global experience and exposure with local support and help.”