Dal Alert!

Receive alerts from Dalhousie by text message.

X

Lauren Longobardi talks about fourth year

A day in the life

Lauren Longobardi talks about fourth year

laurenprofile1

Chemistry professors went out of their way to tell first years about the awesome opportunities for chemistry graduates, about research, and to really get the students excited about a major in chemistry.

Going above and beyond what's required


Lauren Longobardi’s first-year chemistry course won her over to the Chemistry program. Now she’s finishing an honours degree in chemistry and plans to start her PhD next summer.

“I was really inspired in my first year,” she says. “Chemistry professors went out of their way to tell first years about the awesome opportunities for chemistry graduates, about research, and to really get the students excited about a major in chemistry.”

She says chemistry’s unique first year program does a great job of breaking big classes down into manageable groups. Her class held 200 students, but she did not feel lost in a crowd.

“You can make yourself known,” she says. “It’s a matter of becoming active in your program. All my professors know who I am.”

Her advice is simple: Meet your professors, discuss their research, go to their office hours, and attend their tutorials.

In her experience, the faculty here make themselves available to students. They set up tutorials, and set aside extra time to explain problems on the board.

That’s why chemistry instructors have won so many top teaching awards over the last three years at Dal, Lauren says.  

“They are just so dedicated. They go above and beyond what is required. It really helps you succeed. They are really looking out for their students.”

Lauren spent the summer after her first year working on an inorganic research project in Neil Burford’s lab. She took two more summer research positions—in organic and organo-metallic chemistry labs—one for each summer of her degree.

Working closely in the lab with professors and graduate students helped her figure out what she type of chemistry she loved to do: organic chemistry.

Plus, she adds, “if you work hard and are lucky, you can get a publication out of it. The work that I did in my first year just recently got published.”

That looks good for grad school and on a CV. Because of all her supervisors and other faculty who helped her through her first degree, she wants to become a chemistry professor.