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Sample courses

With more than 35 different programs to choose from, the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences offers an incredible selection of courses. Hundreds of options. The breadth of our offerings and the combinations and connections that you can make between them is unparalleled in our region.

This is just a small sampling of all you have to choose from.  

ENGL 2235
Tolkien: Fantasy and Medievalism


Instructor: K. Cawsey



J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings trilogy is one of the most popular works of speculative fiction from the twentieth century, and established the norms for modern fantasy fiction as a genre. In creating Middle Earth and in the writing of The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, The Silmarillion, and other works, Tolkien was at once remarkably derivative and startlingly original. Drawing on his extensive knowledge of medieval literature and Norse mythology, but also incorporating modern concepts such as the anti-hero, pacifism, total war, weapons of mass destruction, industrialization and ecological devastation, Tolkien created a work that stands as one of the landmarks of twentieth-century culture and literature.

Prerequisites: Open to anyone who has successfully completed a Writing Requirement class in any field.

SPAN 1021
Beginning Spanish

In SPAN 1021 students will acquire a general knowledge of Spanish by engaging in communicative and task-based activities that focus on developing speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. This course follows the A1 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFRL). Students will gain competence in grammatical structures, vocabulary, pronunciation and cultural awareness.

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites.
Exclusions: SPAN 1020

LAWS 2500
Introduction to Law

This class, offered by Dalhousie's Schulich School of Law exclusively to undergraduates, is designed to introduce you to the workings of the Canadian legal system and to the basics of several fundamental areas of law. The focus of the class will be the decisions that have been made by courts in Canada. There will be discussion of what the law should be, which will occur in a context of understanding how courts reason, and the principles that they bring to bear in reaching their decisions. In particular, you’ll look at introductory case law concerning tort law (wrongs by one person against another), personal property, criminal law, and the law as it relates to Aboriginal peoples.

Prerequisites: Completion of first-year classes.

SOSA 2403
Food Activism

In this class, you’ll explore food movements and alternative food practices, especially in relation to the modern food system. Lectures and discussions will focus on the key characteristics and critiques of the food system, and focus on case studies of cultural practices and food activism from around the world that challenge or provide alternatives to the current food system.

Prerequisites: One of SOSA 1000, 1002, 1003, 1050, 1100, 1200.
Exclusions: SOSA 2401

THEA 1800
Introduction to Acting and Performance

This class is designed to provide the beginning acting student with an understanding of what it is to act, and to introduce some basic performance techniques. The approach will be practical, focusing on three major sections throughout the year: Space, Character, and Action. Each unit will be comprised of exercises and scene study, the texts of which will range from classical to contemporary. Explorations will be centred on group dynamics, requiring commitment, concentration, and full-bodied participation, which will strengthen communication, teamwork and improvisational skills. Students will challenge themselves physically, vocally, and imaginatively, while working with others to create a safe, dynamic environment.

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites.

Great thinking isn't always disciplined

Which direction will your learning take you? You might find all the courses you want within your program or discipline. You might want to go beyond your core program courses and choose from approved courses in other Arts disciplines. Or you might get really adventurous and combine Arts and Social Sciences courses with some from other Faculties. Our academic advisors can help you choose the best options to fit your goals.