Dal Alert!

Receive alerts from Dalhousie by text message.

X

Sample courses

In the Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) program, you’ll take these and other courses:

DENT 1116
Basic Mechanisms of Disease

This class uses patient cases in a modified problem-based learning (PBL) format to introduce you to the basic concepts and fundamental mechanisms of disease. These PBL modules will be supplemented by lectures. Topics you’ll cover include cell injury, adaptation, and death; inflammation; repair; immunology; vascular disease; and neoplasia.

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites.

DENT 1411
Cariology I

This class will introduce you to the etiology, diagnosis, prevention, and operative management of dental caries. The major areas covered include: histopathology, etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, prevention, and operative principles. In addition to classroom lectures and in-class discussions, you'll gain clinical experience in the treatment of dental diseases while working on mannequins in the dentistry clinic.

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites.

DENT 2211
Clinical Patient Care II

This class, and its complement, DENT 2212, will familiarize you with the basic principles and knowledge needed for patient care. In a clinical setting, you’ll gain experience in the following basic patient-care activities:

  • using diagnostic aids
  • risk assessment
  • diagnosis
  • basic level treatment planning
  • pain control
  • using dental auxiliaries
  • using a dental computer system
  • preventative dental procedures
  • and basic level dental restorative procedures.

You’ll also acquire skills for diagnosing and managing patients with early stages of periodontal disease.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of 1st year of the DDS program.

DENT 3212 / DENT 4212
Clinical Comprehensive Patient Care

These are comprehensive clinical courses conducted through the 3rd and 4th years of the Dentistry program. Students gain clinical experience while treating an assigned group of patients in the Faculty’s comprehensive care clinic. The experience gained is based on patient care treatment completions within the disciplines of Endodontics, Periodontics and Prosthodontics.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of 2nd year of the DDS program.

DENT 3500
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery III

Lectures and seminars each week throughout 3rd year will cover topics pertaining to clinical oral and maxillofacial surgery and provide students with an orientation to general anaesthesia. Students develop clinical skills in oral surgery by treating patients in the Oral Surgery Clinic. A hospital rotation permits students to become familiar with surgical care for patients in an ambulatory and operating room setting.

Prerequisites: Successful completion of 2nd year of the DDS program.



In the first three months of the Qualifying Program, you’ll take courses that will prepare you to join the third and fouth years of the DDS program. Here’s one example:

DENQ 3001
Clinical Dental Sciences for Dentistry in Canada

In this class, you’ll cover topics including patient care, periodontology, cariology, endodontics, removable prosthodontics, and pediatric dentistry. These modules will familiarize you with the basic principles and knowledge for treating the patient at the end of the second year of the DDS program. In a clinical setting, you’ll demonstrate a variety of clinical activities, including the following:

  • using diagnostic aids
  • risk assessment
  • diagnosis
  • treatment planning
  • pain control
  • using allied dental personnel
  • using a dental computer system
  • preventive dental procedures
  • basic restorative procedures
  • diagnosis and management of early types of periodontal disease
  • removable dentures
  • and endodontics.

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites.



In all programs, you can choose from among many elective courses or workshops. One example is the elective in mindfulness:

DENT 1550
Mindfulness Elective

This elective class offers you an oasis of holistic self-care, in an otherwise rigorous, science-based curriculum. The primary aim is to help you help others. Interested students will learn to establish an ongoing mindfulness practice in a supportive, small-group environment of like-minded classmates, staff, and faculty. In addition to readings and discussions, you’ll explore ways of integrating mindfulness skills into daily life—and work—through such mindfulness practices as sitting, standing, and walking meditation, breathing exercises, tai chi, and journaling.

Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites.